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  • Welcome to Wednesday`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Ten minutes of current events coverage is coming your way.

  • First up, a shake up at the U.S. Transportation Security Administration.

  • This is a part of the Department of Homeland Security.

  • The TSA is responsible for

  • protecting America`s transportation system.

  • And its acting administrator, Melvin Carraway,

  • has been reassigned to another job.

  • Why? Undercover agents recently tried to smuggle illegal items

  • like fake explosives at TSA checkpoints.

  • In almost all of the tests, the TSA failed to find them.

  • It`s since been directed to take a number of steps

  • to make sure this doesn`t happen again.

  • A Homeland Security spokesperson says

  • these reports never look good out of context,

  • but that they`re important in the continual evolution of airline security.

  • The Department of Homeland Security discovered TSA officers

  • failed 95 percent of the time during undercover operations,

  • the officers failing 67 out of 70 tests to detect mock explosives

  • and weapons at airport security checkpoints.

  • These are anomalies that TSA screeners and/or their equipment

  • should locate and at least flagged for an additional screening.

  • The department`s red teams posed as passengers

  • attempting to pass through checkpoints with the mock weapons.

  • I am put the plastic explosive.

  • Back in 2008, CNN was there for a similar covert operation.

  • That time, it was TSA testing its own officers.

  • At the checkpoint, the testers wanded

  • and padded down right where the fake explosive device was concealed.

  • But the screener missed it. It`s not until the tester lifts up his shirt.

  • Oh, I see it now.

  • In response to the troubling failures,

  • Secretary Johnson said in a statement

  • that he is immediately directing the TSA to revise its screening procedures,

  • conduct training and re-evaluate their screening equipment.

  • This has grown completely out of control.

  • It isn`t doing the job we need to.

  • What we need to do is be able to connect the dots,

  • get intelligence information, go after people who pose a risk;

  • and they can`t do it with the current system.

  • The deadline came and went, and on Sunday night, the Patriot Act expired.

  • The law was initially passed a month after the September 11th,

  • 2001 terrorist attacks on the U.S. Its goal: to prevent terrorism.

  • One method it used, collecting certain phone data

  • of millions of Americans was controversial.

  • You get a sense of that in the debate among Senate Republicans.

  • Even the authors of the Patriot Act say

  • that the Patriot Act in no way gives authority to the president

  • to collect all of your phone records all of the time.

  • We shouldn`t be disarming unilaterally,

  • as our enemies grow more sophisticated and aggressive.

  • Isn`t this program as critical as it`s ever been since its inception,

  • given the fact that the Middle East is literally

  • on fire and we are losing everywhere?

  • There is new legislation tied to data collection, though.

  • It`s called the USA Freedom Act.

  • The House passed it weeks ago, the Senate did last night.

  • President Obama is expected to sign it.

  • Under the new law, telecommunications companies would keep the data

  • on Americans phone records,

  • and the federal government can get it if it has a targeted warrant.

  • Because the law gives the government six months

  • to transition from the old system to the new,

  • its telephone data collection could continue during that time.

  • The Middle Eastern territory of Gaza is struggling to rebuild.

  • It`s been almost a year since the Palestinian-controlled area was torn again by war.

  • The most recent conflict begun with the murder of three Israel teenagers last June.

  • Israel blamed Hamas, the Palestinian militant group that controls Gaza.

  • In early July, a Palestinian teenager was murdered.

  • Rocket attacks from Gaza into Israel increased

  • and Israel launched an operation targeting Hamas forces in Gaza.

  • In the six-week war, 2,100 Palestinians, most of them civilians,

  • were killed. Sixty-eight Israelis, most of them soldiers, were killed.

  • It was the latest cycle of violence.

  • Gaza is only about 25 miles long and seven miles wide,

  • but this small ship of land is one of the most fought over in history.

  • It was an Egyptian base, a rural city of the Palestine and the place

  • where the Hebrew hero Samson betrayed by Delilah met his death.

  • Since then, much blood has been spilled.

  • The most recent contest for Gaza began at the end of World War II,

  • when persecuted Jews traveled to Israel from Europe looking for a new start,

  • after the horrors of the Holocaust.

  • In 1947, the U.N. created a plan to split Israel into two countries,

  • one for Jews and one for the Arab people.

  • Backed by the U.S. President Harry S. Truman, David Ben Gurion, Israel`s founder,

  • proclaimed the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948.

  • Egypt then attacked Israel through the Gaza Strip.

  • Israel was victorious but Gaza remained under the control of Egypt,

  • and an influx of Palestinian refugees begun.

  • In 1967, war broke out between Israel, Egypt,

  • Jordan and Syria, in what became known as the Six Day War.

  • Israel seized the Gaza Strip and held it for about 40 years.

  • In 2006, Hamas, a group that wants to destroy Israel,

  • and listed by the United States and European Union and others as a terrorist group,

  • won a landslide victory in Palestinian legislative elections,

  • and Israel unilaterally pulled its forces out of Gaza that year.

  • Hamas was now in control of the territory.

  • However, Israel still controls much of the areas access to and from the Gaza Strip.

  • Since then, Israel and Hamas have been exchanging blows.

  • Israel maintains Hamas is a violent terror organization.

  • While Hamas says they represent an oppressed people

  • being victimized by the Jewish state.

  • The international community continues to press for a cease in violence.

  • But for now, the Strip`s population of 1.8 million people are trapped in the crossfire.

  • Four days after Sepp Blatter was reelected as president of FIFA,

  • he said yesterday he`d step down. FIFA governs soccer worldwide.

  • Last week, the U.S. Justice Department announced major corruption charges against it,

  • saying several FIFA officials had taken millions in bribes over 24 years.

  • President Blatter was not one of those accused,

  • but he says he doesn`t feel he has the support from the entire world of soccer,

  • and that FIFA needs a profound overhaul.

  • He plans to stay on until his successor is elected.

  • Some soccer officials who`d criticized Blatter called his decision the right one

  • and a major step forward for reform.

  • So, who`s watching this Wednesday? It`s time for the roll call.

  • Broad Creek Middle School is in Newport, North Carolina.

  • And the Bulldogs are online in the Tar Heel State.

  • From St. Joseph, Michigan, the Great Lake State,

  • we`ve got the Bears here from St. Joseph High School.

  • And yet another St. Joseph, the St. Joseph Villa Academy

  • -- hello to our viewers in Cincinnati, Ohio.

  • According to textinganddrivingsafety.com,

  • our eyes are off the road for at least five seconds whenever we text and drive.

  • So, at 55 miles per hour,

  • it`s like driving the length of the football field without looking.

  • A significant majority of American High School Students have phones.

  • Because of them probably want to live to be 100,

  • Dr. Gupta is making some calls.

  • Texting and driving is one of these real concerns

  • that we can actually do something about.

  • We know for example every year,

  • there are around 100,000 texting while driving accidents.

  • When you`re texting and driving, your reaction time decreases,

  • your concentration decreases.

  • Some people have likened to driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.08.

  • Just like they say -- you don`t let friends drive drunk,

  • you don`t let friends drive while texting either.

  • There are various state laws in place to limit texting and driving.

  • Obviously, there are traffic tickets that are being given.

  • There`s also been some really interesting technologies,

  • everything from automatic replies from your phone

  • if someone is calling or texting or emailing you,

  • to even devices that will monitor how fast the phone is moving within your car.

  • If it gets over a certain speed limit, the phone becomes deactivated.

  • Your best bet is something I started doing as well,

  • is just put the phone out of reach.

  • However long it takes you to get home,

  • most of those calls, those emails, those texts, they can wait.

  • It`s a good way to try and live to 100.

  • We covered the incredible dog challenge before on CNN STUDENT NEWS,

  • but never this event. Aboard surfboards,

  • competitive canines at the event in Huntington Beach, California,

  • we`re hanging 20. Most of them looked like they were having fun assuming

  • they face forward and didn`t eat the waves.

  • Of course, they didn`t have to stand up on two feet to quality,

  • but it seems certainly breeds would have the advantage.

  • Consider the American Water Spaniel, the Irish Water Spaniel,

  • and the Portuguese Water Dog.

  • What about the Otter Hound and the Bay Retriever?

  • Of course, the canine capable of surfing up the best scores

  • could very well be the Border Collie.

  • I`m Carl Azuz and it`s tide we`d be going.

Welcome to Wednesday`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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2015年6月3日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (June 3, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle)

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