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  • Fridays are awesome. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS, commercial-free current events.

  • I`m Carl Azuz at the CNN Center.

  • First up, this first day of May

  • We`ve been reporting on the peaceful protest in the riots in Baltimore, Maryland.

  • Tensions in the eastern U.S. city heated up after the arrest and mysterious death of Freddie Gray.

  • Here`s what we know about it: the 25-year-old African-American man was arrested on April 12th.

  • At some point, he suffered a severe injury to his spine.

  • Gray died on April 19th.

  • Officials are trying to determine whether Gray was injured before his arrest, during his arrest,

  • or at some point afterward while he was being transported in a police van.

  • The police department has done its investigation yesterday

  • and gave those findings to prosecutors in the Baltimore attorney`s office.

  • Other investigations continue.

  • Meanwhile, some current and former members of the NFL`s Baltimore Ravens have been visiting schools near where the protests occurred.

  • Dozens of pro-football players and coach John Harbaugh had been distributing food, encouraging students

  • and discouraging them from getting involved in violence.

  • SUBTITLE: Supervolcano fears.

  • Underneath Yellowstone National Park lies a supervolcano that will erupt some day.

  • Scientists say an eruption would cover much of the western United States with volcanic ash.

  • Beneath Old Faithful is a plum of hot rock large enough to fill the Grand Canyon l4 times.

  • The yearly chance of a supervolcano eruption is 1 in 700,000.

  • In 1980, Mount St. Helen`s erupted, scattering volcanic ash across Washington state.

  • The last known eruption of Yellowstone was 640,000 years ago.

  • The eruption created the Yellowstone Caldera, a 1,500 square mile crater.

  • "If another large caldera-forming eruption were to occur at Yellowstone its effects would be worldwide.

  • The U.S.-led coalition continues to attack terrorists in the Middle East.

  • Yesterday, officials reported 21 airstrikes against ISIS, Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, the very countries where the airstrikes were carried.

  • Like other terrorist groups, ISIS routinely murder civilians, sometimes by the dozens.

  • But unlike many other terrorist groups, ISIS is relatively well-organized.

  • When it takes over territory, it then sets up government there.

  • ISIS sees itself as a state, a government. Its ambition: to be an Islamic caliphate that

  • claims sovereignty over the world`s Muslim communities.

  • So, how does ISIS govern the territory it controls? Accepts (ph) the garbage, run schools and patrols the traffic.

  • This is an area larger than many countries and ISIS has divided the territory into Wilayats

  • or provinces, each of which has a governor.

  • Several new provinces had been created, virtually erasing the Syria/Iraq border.

  • At the top of the government is Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the self- declared caliph of ISIS.

  • He has the sort of cabinet, the Shura Council, and beneath that, about 10 ministries or councils

  • that maintain everything from health, education and religious rulings, to transportation and even environmental policy.

  • Despite its medieval sense of justice, in many ways, ISIS runs a surprisingly modern

  • bureaucracy, according to terror analyst. The health department has fully operational

  • hospitals, complete with maternity wards, babies are delivered daily, registered and issued with official ISIS birthcertificates.

  • It also has a court system that runs its strict interpretation of Sharia or Islamic law.

  • Theft, for example, is punishable by chopping off the hand. It also handles everything from traffic violations to rental disputes.

  • The education department runs several schools, and even the university in Mosul. Girls receive

  • an education, though segregated from boys. And the curriculum is severely limited

  • no art, music, or theater, no psychical education or philosophy -- just reading, writing, math

  • and, of course, religion according to ISIS.

  • In many places, ISIS has simply taken over the civil infrastructure already in place,

  • particularly in war-torn Syria.

  • ISIS hopes to prove it is bringing order to chaos, however violent its rule.

  • Water Winter Wonderland is one nickname for the state of Michigan. We`re diving in to today`s roll call.

  • Petoskey High School is in the city of Petoskey. The Northmen are watching there.

  • We would love to visit sometimes.

  • Next, we`re going to the Peach State with the Black Knights of Richards Middle School

  • are online. Hello, Lawrenceville, Georgia.

  • And in the Western Pacific, it`s great to see the Wolverines in Okinawa, Japan. Kadena

  • Middle School wraps up our roll.

  • A new candidate in the race for the White House -- Senator Bernie Sanders announced

  • his candidacy yesterday. He`s an independent from Vermont, but he`ll try to become the

  • Democratic Party`s nominee for president.

  • Also seeking the Democratic nomination, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

  • On the Republican side, Texas Senator Ted Cruz, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, and Florida

  • Senator Marco Rubio have formally announced their candidacies.

  • The nation of Greece includes about 2,000 islets, fewer than 200 of them are inhabited

  • and one of them is what`s been labeled a Blue Zone.

  • These are areas in the world where people tend to live longer. There`s one in Okinawa,

  • Japan, where our roll call school was. There`s on in Sardinia, Italy.

  • What is it about Ikaria, Greece, that according to Bluezones.com helps people live longer

  • with fewer cases of cancer and heart disease?

  • The island of Ikaria -- a short ferry ride back in time.

  • Like many of the Greek islands, it is a lush, rugged rock perched above the ashore Aegean Sea.

  • But unlike the rest of Greece, the rest of

  • Europe, heck, the rest of the most of the world, Ikarians live really long and really well.

  • True story, a 104-year-old woman walked into a bank on this island, looking for a loan. The banker

  • politely explained that financing is only available to those under the age of 103.

  • So, how they manage to thumb their nose at the Grim Reaper display?

  • As the ferry gets closer to this intriguing island, the first vital hint comes into view.

  • You`ll notice that the shoreline of Ikaria is not exactly the most hospitable when it

  • comes to docking a boat, very rocky, very craggy, no real natural ports.

  • And enter the winds around this part of the Aegean, notoriously squarely, sailors have

  • been complaining about these winds going back to the Iliad. So, that combination of factors

  • made this island a really lonely place for a long time.

  • Yes, by a cork of geology and meteorology, the creep of modern society completely missed Ikaria.

  • All the striving, the stresses sailed ride on by.

  • In all blue zones, about 95 percent of their dietary intake is plants. It`s actually very high carb, believe it or not.

  • All these protein, paleo stuff, not in blue zones.

  • Really?

  • They`re eating very high carb diet, but complex carbohydrates. Almost all plants.

  • These hills are filled with herbs and greens and teas, all filled with antioxidant homeopathic goodness.

  • Even Ikarian honey is one of a kind.

  • So, the bees pollinate with this fine, kind of scrub brush (ph) and it creates this distinctive honey.

  • Yes, that`s really thick. It looks like peanut butter and it`s actually an anti-cancer agent.

  • And is it true they take a big spoonful every morning, just to coat the digestive --

  • Several -- yes, several of the centenarians would for the first thing, they start the

  • morning with the tablespoon of honey

  • and the idea is that not only coats it but also lowers inflammation.

  • So, before we go segment have story, summer is just a random, goofy things that people and animals do.

  • And summer just really cool to look at. Like this lava lake in Hawaii.

  • The state`s Kilauea Volcano has overflowed.

  • Activity here isn`t exactly unusual. It`s the most active volcano in the world.

  • The thing has been erupting for more than 30 years.

  • It`s really cool to visit, but you probably don't want to live too close by.

  • Even some photographers would say there`s no Kilauea, they get that close. But there`s

  • a lot to love about the pictures, if any one calderas to visit them.

  • I`m Carl Azuz and we`ll have even quieter punch next week.

Fridays are awesome. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS, commercial-free current events.

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2015年5月1日 - 時事ネタでCNN学生ニュース (May 1, 2015 - CNN Students News with Current Events)

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    Adam Huang に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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