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  • The Middle Eastern nation of Yemen isn`t a particularly large country.

  • It`s not the region`s most influential country.

  • How might it become the battlefield for a proxy war?

  • Hi. I`m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • That`s what`s first up this Thursday, April 2.

  • The United Nations says Yemen is on the brink of falling apart.

  • The Houthis, a Yemeni rebel group,

  • took over the government earlier this year.

  • Saudi Arabia is leading a coalition of nearby countries

  • in airstrikes against the Houthis.

  • Some of them have been killed.

  • Some civilians have been killed.

  • The Houthi rebel leader refuses to surrender

  • and the country has become a focus of international concern.

  • What happens here and who winds up in charge of Yemen

  • after the violence settles could shape the religious

  • and political future of the Middle East.

  • Yemen is home to about 26 million people.

  • It doesn`t have many natural resources,

  • so accordingly, it is one of the poorest Arab states.

  • So why are so many other nations interested in the rebels

  • there who have attacked the government

  • and why have a coalition of other Arab nations

  • put together a military force to fight those rebels?

  • Three big reasons.

  • First of all, this is a religious conflict.

  • The rebels are Shiites.

  • The government they pushed out there was Sunni.

  • Many of the nations out here have mixes of Sunnis and Shiites in them.

  • Any way that this conflict plays out has a chance

  • of affecting the overall mix and influence of those religions here.

  • It`s all Islam, but there is still a power struggle going on.

  • Secondly, this is a proxy war between two very big powers,

  • Saudi Arabia, just to the north of Yemen there,

  • and Iran over here. Again, Iran is Shiite, Saudi Arabia is Sunni.

  • However this plays out in Yemen will have an impact

  • on who is seen as a victor here and what sort of influence

  • they continue to have in that region.

  • And lastly, this conflict has put the United States

  • in a very peculiar position at a sensitive time.

  • Remember, Saudi Arabia is a long-time partner

  • of the United States, an ally.

  • But if the U.S. backs them too much,

  • it could upset these delicate talks going on

  • with Iran over its nuclear program.

  • On top of all of that, Yemen has long been home to Al Qaeda

  • in the Arabian Peninsula and all of this is happening at a time

  • when the United States and other Western powers

  • want allies there against al Qaeda,

  • against ISIS and against other terrorist groups.

  • All of that has made Yemen not merely a flashpoint now,

  • but a global focal point.

  • Time for the Shoutout.

  • Which of these inventions was made during the Middle Ages?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Was it the mechanical clock, eyeliner, Tesla coil or aqueduct.

  • You`ve got three seconds. Go.

  • The only one of these inventions made between the years 500 A.D.

  • and the Renaissance was the mechanical clock.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your Shoutout.

  • Modern-day science might have just learned something

  • from Middle Ages medicine.

  • "Bald`s Leechbook," a medical textbook dating back to the 900s,

  • has a recipe for an eye ointment -- garlic, onion or leeks,

  • wine and part of a cow`s stomach.

  • Researchers at the University of Nottingham in the U.K.

  • recently decided to test this out as an antibiotic.

  • They almost couldn`t believe the results.

  • You`ve heard us talk about super bugs lately --

  • bacteria that are hard to kill with modern antibiotics.

  • MRSA is an example. And shockingly,

  • the 1,000-year-old eye remedy destroys MRSA.

  • Its ingredients aren`t thought to be particularly effective

  • on their own and researchers aren`t sure yet how they work together.

  • Next step is to see if this works as well outside a laboratory setting.

  • At first, some scientists might have thought an April Fool`s joke.

  • It`s not. But there was no shortage of pranking going on yesterday.

  • A UFO landing in Britain from 1989,

  • Taco Bell buying the Liberty Bell from 1996,

  • carrots with holes that whistle when you cook them from 2002.

  • All of these are examples of April Fools hoaxes.

  • How did this stuff get started?

  • Where did April Fools Day come from?

  • Well, the origins are unclear,

  • but one theory ties the unofficial holiday to a shifting calendar.

  • In ancient cultures, New Year`s Day was celebrated on April 1.

  • But in 1582, Pope Gregory XIII moved the holiday to January 1.

  • Not everybody got the message.

  • Those that continued to celebrate on April 1 were called April fools.

  • Funny, right?

  • Much of Britain didn`t adopt the new calendar until 1752.

  • But they were celebrating April Fools Day long before that.

  • In Scotland, it`s a two day affair.

  • If you`ve ever had a kick me sign taped to your back,

  • you might blame the Scots.

  • April Fools Day has also been linked to the vernal equinox

  • and the start of spring.

  • That`s when the ancient Romans had their hilarious festival of Hilaria.

  • Hindus have Holi and Purim is celebrated in Judaism.

  • Some of the biggest April Fools Day

  • pranks are courtesy of corporations and the media.

  • In 1940, a press release from The Franklin Institute,

  • a science museum in Philadelphia,

  • declared the world would end the following day.

  • They were seeking publicity for a lecture series

  • and a local radio station reported on it.

  • In 1957, the BBC falsely reported a bumper

  • crop of spaghetti trees in Switzerland.

  • Another reason why this may be a bumper year

  • lies in the virtual disappearance of the spaghetti weevil.

  • And in 1998, Burger King announced the left-handed Whopper,

  • specifically designed for the 32 million left-handed Americans,

  • including myself.

  • In 1982, Marilyn Price was on a mountain biking trip.

  • She stopped at a spot where she could see

  • all of San Francisco and she thought to herself,

  • I want kids to see this,

  • specifically the ones she`d recently met at a soup kitchen.

  • Since then, the 74-year-old rider has helped

  • tens of thousands of young people in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond.

  • I`ve been riding since age four.

  • I will never forget my father when he let go of my seat

  • and I was there on my own and that was 70 years ago.

  • A lot of kids have never really left the city.

  • To them, everything is concrete.

  • Is everybody excited?

  • I decided to take kids who never had my kind of experience

  • on these mountain bike rides.

  • OK you guys, let`s hit the road.

  • I wasn`t trying at school. I was getting straight Fs so I got expelled.

  • When we go on bike rides, I kind of feel like it clears my mind.

  • Looking good!

  • I`ve been doing this for almost 30 years.

  • You bring them where there are no buildings.

  • It is like wow, I didn`t know that this exists.

  • And then we have our earn a bike program,

  • where kids in the city come after school.

  • What`s wrong with it?

  • The chain.

  • So the chain is loose?

  • Yes.

  • They learn how to work on bikes

  • and they earn points toward bikes as their own.

  • That looks great. They learn good job skills.

  • This bike is getting quite an overhaul.

  • Now I have As and Bs.

  • They`re like my guide to a better life.

  • There is opportunity to see that, yes,

  • I have been able to accomplish what I thought I couldn`t.

  • Come on, you guys.

  • It is not just biking. We are imparting life lessons.

  • For the first time ever on our Roll Call,

  • we`re taking you to the capital of Peru. That`s Lima.

  • And we`re happy to see the students of

  • Collegio Franklin Delano Roosevelt,

  • The American School of Lima.

  • Stateside, in Colorado,

  • The Polar Bears of North Middle School made a request

  • at cnnstudentnews.com. Hello to everyone in Aurora.

  • We`ve also got some Bears in Central New Hampshire.

  • Newfound Regional High School is on a roll from the town of Bristol.

  • Shapeshifting is no longer limited to science fiction.

  • This frog does it.

  • It was discovered in the Ecuadorian Andes Mountains.

  • It`s able to change its skin from smooth to spiny in a matter of minutes.

  • No other vertebrate is known to be able to change its skin texture.

  • The animal`s about the size of a marble

  • and scientists think the shapeshifting

  • helps it blend into its mossy surroundings.

  • They named it the punk rocker frog for its spikes.

  • It`s not easy to frogette and you could never call it spineless.

  • It might seem like...

The Middle Eastern nation of Yemen isn`t a particularly large country.

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2015年4月2日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (April 2, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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