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  • Thanks for watching CNN STUDENT NEWS,

  • your commercial-free source for current events.

  • I`m Carl Azuz at the CNN Center.

  • Today is a deadline for an international agreement

  • involving a controversial nuclear program.

  • On one side of the table, the Middle Eastern nation of Iran.

  • It insists its nuclear program is for civilian power

  • and other peaceful purposes.

  • Members of the international community are concerned

  • it could be used to make nuclear weapons.

  • On the other side of the table, the U.S.,

  • the U.K., China, France, Germany and Russia.

  • They`re considering lifting economic penalties,

  • sanctions on Iran, if it puts a hold on its nuclear program.

  • But as of last night, there were some hang-ups in the negotiations.

  • One, how quickly will Iran be allowed

  • to develop its nuclear program after 10 years?

  • How quickly will other countries lift their sanctions?

  • And if Iran breaks the deal, will the sanctions be put back in place?

  • We`ll update you on whether an agreement is reached.

  • What happens with that potential deal

  • can have an impact on the price of oil.

  • Global crude prices plummeted last year

  • as oil production in the U.S. shot up.

  • 2014 was America`s biggest one year increase

  • in oil production in more than a century.

  • Hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking,

  • a way of extracting oil from the ground, factored in.

  • so did horizontal drilling.

  • Number of stories we`ve covered this year

  • can further influence oil`s price.

  • Look, they`re -- they`re making

  • -- producing so much oil in this country,

  • they`re running out of places to put it.

  • And that could cause some pressure on prices down the road.

  • So three kind of story lines here.

  • One, we`re producing one and a half million barrels a day

  • more crude than the world is using

  • and so you`ve got this big supply issue.

  • Two, the Iran nuclear deal. If the deal is in,

  • Iran could potentially be exporting legally more oil.

  • That would be even more supply on top of more supply.

  • But here, let me rein it back a little bit,

  • because then there`s this other big negative.

  • What about Yemen?

  • Yemen and Saudi Arabia leading, potentially,

  • more ground offensives -- a ground offensive into Yemen.

  • Instability in the Middle East could cause oil prices to pop.

  • Napoleon Bonaparte was known for being a conqueror,

  • for the Napoleonic Code, for being nicknamed The Little Corporal.

  • But he probably wasn`t that little.

  • History tells us that Napoleon was 5`2" tall.

  • But many historians say that`s in French units,

  • which were actually longer than British measurements.

  • Napoleon`s actual height was probably closer to 5`6,"

  • which would make him slightly above average for a man of his era.

  • Say thale assam (ph).

  • All right, when George Washington served as president,

  • from 1789 to 1797, he earned an annual salary of $25,000 a year.

  • Great money back then.

  • Since 2001, U.S. presidents have earned a $400,000 a year salary,

  • plus they get an expense account worth $50,000.

  • What`s interesting is that many U.S. leaders

  • had plenty of money to start with.

  • Nowadays, it takes a lot of money to run for president.

  • Just look back at the 2012 election cycle.

  • Overall spending for both President Obama

  • and his Republican opponent, Mitt Romney,

  • topped over a billion dollars each.

  • But this has us wondering, are all presidents made of money?

  • Have we ever had a middle class or poor president?

  • It turns out we have, and some that have even gone bankrupt.

  • After adjusting for inflation,

  • the two wealthiest presidents in American history

  • where George Washington and John F. Kennedy.

  • Washington was worth over a half a billion dollars in today`s money.

  • And his presidential salary was much higher than later presidents,

  • totaling 2 percent of the U.S. budget for 1789.

  • His 8,000 acres of farmland and Mount Vernon property

  • accounted for some of his wealth.

  • JFK`s family was worth national a billion dollars

  • when adjusted for inflation.

  • While he never inherited his father`s wealth,

  • JFK`s family was one of the wealthiest in America

  • and all of his wealth came from a shared family trust.

  • But there have been presidential hardships, too.

  • Abraham Lincoln was in complete poverty

  • after a sour investment in a general store that went bankrupt.

  • He was paying down debts into the 1840s.

  • President Harry S. Truman was relatively poor all of his life

  • and took a major hit after a clothing store he owned went bankrupt.

  • He and his wife were also the first two to officially receive Lyndon B.

  • Johnson`s famed Medicare program.

  • But with the modern-day onslaught of book deals and speaking fees,

  • a president`s path to wealth and prosperity has become more clear.

  • President Obama took office in 2009 with an estimated income

  • of $5.5 million thanks to book sales.

  • Bill Clinton ranks in the top 10 wealthiest presidents in history.

  • After leaving office, he has earned at least $104.9 million

  • in speaking fees since 2001 and his wife,

  • former secretary of State Hillary Clinton,

  • received an estimated $14 million as a book advance.

  • And she gets more than $200,000 per speaking engagement.

  • Together, their net worth hovers around $55 million.

  • And then there`s the Bush family dynasty,

  • whose wealth comes from a rich history in finance and Texas oil.

  • Former President George W. Bush, as of 2012,

  • is slated to be worth $20 million.

  • His brother, Jeb Bush, is said to earn at least $3.2 million

  • for sitting on corporate boards and around $50,000 per speech.

  • So the question then becomes,

  • will we ever have a middle class or poor president

  • or will all 21st century presidents be wealthy?

  • The capital of Egypt,

  • it`s the home of our third school in today`s Roll Call.

  • We`re starting in Sarasota, situated in The Sunshine State.

  • The Panthers are on the prowl at Suncoast School

  • for Innovative Studies on Florida`s Gulf Coast.

  • Not far from the Atlantic Coast in The Old Line State,

  • we`ve got The Dolphins of Rosa Parks Middle School.

  • They`re in Olney, Maryland.

  • And Cairo is the capital of Egypt.

  • Nearby is the west campus

  • of The American International School of Egypt.

  • With The Lynx staying linked to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • There are a lot of different types of service dogs.

  • Guide dogs help people who are blind or visually impaired.

  • Hearing dogs can alert the hearing impaired to sounds

  • in the area around them.

  • Mobility assistance animals can open doors

  • and pick up things that have been dropped.

  • And for the highly trainable canine with an adventurous spirit,

  • there`s avalanche rescue.

  • Every year, more than 150 people worldwide are killed in avalanches.

  • The most common causes of death are suffocation, trauma,

  • and, to a lesser degree, hypothermia.

  • Since the human body is three times denser

  • than avalanche debris, we sink more quickly

  • and once the avalanche stops, it gets so packed,

  • it`s like hardened concrete.

  • That`s why rescue dogs are so important.

  • It would take rescue workers four hours to search a little over two acres.

  • A rescue dog can cover the same terrain in just about 30 minutes.

  • And it doesn`t matter if they`ve smelled the person before or not?

  • It`s like us using our eyes. I mean they`re running around smelling.

  • We`ve trained them from a very young age to recognize

  • that human scent and pursue it to the source.

  • What makes a dog stand out to and say

  • that`s the kind of dog that we need?

  • We want a dog that`s brave, that`s got a lot of confidence.

  • The entire search training that they do is just a big game.

  • What`s your bond like with Digger?

  • They`re our partners.

  • They`re our buddies. So the bond is just like super tight. It`s awesome.

  • Ninety-three percent of avalanche victims

  • live if pulled out within 15 minutes. After 45 minutes,

  • only 20 to 30 percent of victims survive.

  • After two hours of being buried in the snow,

  • most people don`t make it.

  • To do lives, they just -- I mean that`s --

  • that`s sort of that foundation that we start

  • -- start with with the dogs, right?

  • And then we eventually switch to finding articles,

  • we can also look a -- like a nice big sweater under the snow,

  • which makes it easier for us to go out and train

  • if there are sweaters and the very live people all the time.

  • So it`s been implanted in their brains

  • that it`s just the bet thing in life.

  • So this is my little snow caved where I`m being buried

  • so that they can hopefully come find me.

  • Well, he pulled me out. It was a very strong tug of war.

  • He`s got a good reverse, a four wheel drive reverse for him.

  • What`s the hardest part, though,

  • of trying to rescue someone in an avalanche

  • when you`re working with a dog?

  • To be fast, efficient and also not expose your rescuers,

  • your team, to undue hazard.

  • If your group you`re skiing with is not rescuing you

  • from the avalanche, the chances of organized rescue

  • being successful in a live find is pretty slim.

  • We`re wrapping up with a follow-up to a story

  • we showed you a few weeks ago.

  • Remember that eagle

  • that endured a pile of Pennsylvania snow to keep her eggs warm?

  • scientists said the snow didn`t matter,

  • the animal`s feathers were insulating enough.

  • Well, here`s proof. They hatched, one right after the other, last week.

  • They`ll stay in the nest until they`re about 12 weeks old,

  • at which point they`ll spread their wings and fly away.

  • The parents took turns incubating the eagles.

  • They`re pretty egalitarian that way.

  • It took an eagle amount of work and all things being eagle,

  • we`d say their future will soon take wing,

  • even if they have to wing it.

  • I`m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Thanks for watching CNN STUDENT NEWS,

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2015年3月31日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (March 31, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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