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  • I`m Carl Azuz. And welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS. First up this Thursday, November 20th.

  • This is an historic event, I believe when all is set and done,

  • this snowfall may break also - it`s a record, and that`s saying something in western New York and in Buffalo.

  • That`s because average snowfall in Buffalo, New York is about 94 inches per year.

  • The city`s gotten 72 inches since Tuesday, and has caused emergencies.

  • At least six deaths in region have been blamed on this winter storm.

  • It`s monstrous. People were trapped in cars, firehouses were turned into shelters.

  • Residents aren`t even allowed to drive in south Buffalo

  • where rescuers are using 18 snowmobiles to answer emergency calls.

  • Buffalo is located on Lake Erie

  • It often sees lake effect snow when cold air passes over warmer water,

  • picks up moisture from the lake and dumps snow on Erie`s east or south of the lake.

  • Buffalo is not the only shivering city.

  • Every U.S. state saw freezing temperatures this week and arctic air brought snow to half of them.

  • There`s a pipeline network that moves tons of crude oil from Canada to the U.S.

  • It`s called the Keystone pipeline system.

  • It stretches about 3800 miles in all, and there`s one piece of the project that hasn`t been completed.

  • It`s called the Keystone XL pipeline, and a company named TransCanada needs U.S. approval to finish it.

  • That approval has been stalled in the U.S. government.

  • It passed last week in the Republican controlled House of Representatives,

  • but it failed this week by one vote in the Democratic-controlled Senate.

  • It`s likely to come up again next year when the new Congress starts.

  • Polls have indicated most Americans support the pipeline, but what`s blocking its completion?

  • The Keystone XL pipeline extension would stretch about 1200 miles,

  • most of it in the United States, from Alberta, Canada down to Nebraska.

  • There are lots of pipelines out there, some of which would connect with this,

  • so why all the fuss about this extension?

  • First of all, the environment. Opponents say that they fear that this will spoil the landscape.

  • If there`s a spill that can contaminate ground water,

  • hurt humans and animals, and they say this is dirty oil,

  • a type of oil that when it`s burned produced more greenhouse gases.

  • Supporters say the company that wants this,

  • TransCanada has already promised much more robust safety measures

  • that rail shipments are rising already to bring this oil in,

  • and the rail shipments are riskier than the pipeline would be.

  • Second issue, jobs. Supporters like to cite a study that says somewhere around 42,000 jobs

  • or more would benefit from this pipeline.

  • That includes not only people who work on it,

  • but people in restaurants and hotels, and supply houses, but opponents say that`s all temporary,

  • that`s for one or two years while this thing is built.

  • In the end, there're maybe only 50 permanent jobs coming out of this.

  • So, that raises the real question: why would you want to build this thing at all?

  • It`s only 36 inches across, doesn`t really make a difference.

  • Supporters say yes, it does. It means about 830,000 barrels of oil a day

  • coming into the United States from a secure ally reducing our dependence on overseas oil

  • from places like Venezuela or the Middle East.

  • Whereas opponents say look, it is just not worth it.

  • For all those various reasons they`ve already cited,

  • even as supporters continue to say look,

  • it`s time after all this debate to dig the trenches and to get this pipe into the ground.

  • Nerd is an interesting word.

  • Dictionaries define it as either meaning a stupid or a smart person.

  • It was likely first used in 1950, in the Dr. Seuss` book "If I Ran the Zoo."

  • I`ll sail to Ka-troo and bring back an It-Kutch a Preep and a Proo

  • a Nerkle, a Nerd and a Seersucker too." Kind of nerdy for knowing that. It`s random.

  • New report in our series on affording the cost of college:

  • federal work study jobs can give you the chance to work part-time while you are in school,

  • but a school has to participate in the government program,and not all students qualify for it.

  • Private school, in particular, is expensive.

  • Sticker price including room and board for the average U.S. private college,more than $42,000 per year.

  • But at Blackburn College in Illinois, it`s just under $24,000 per year.

  • The price comes down when students work at it.

  • Some universities are starting to look like resorts with pricy amenities

  • like SPAs rock walls and swimming pools,and they are passing along the bill to students.

  • Tuition expenses have risen more than 1200 percent since 1978,

  • but Blackburn College in Illinois is keeping tuition cost low.

  • Thanks to a little thrift. Blackburn College is expanding.

  • It has a $2.5 million renovation project.

  • But a novel way to pay for it. Student work crews.

  • You can see where students for years have been literally laying the bricks.

  • We do maintain a pretty lean organizational stuffing structure,

  • and that is done with the expectation that we do use students to supplement those labor needs.

  • And it`s not just construction jobs.

  • 90 percent of the student body works ten hours per week on campus.

  • In everything from gardening to security to administrative positions.

  • IN exchange, they get tuition credit.

  • But you see the parents who say, oh, I don`t want my kid to go to school to work.

  • I don`t want them to be distracted. I want them to go to spend four years to learn.

  • We do have that. We do have parents that question that piece of it,

  • and what we explain to them,that this is an enhancement,

  • this is an enhancement to their overall portfolio that will make them more marketable upon graduation.

  • So, guys, can you grab me 431?

  • Sophomore Joha Esparaza manages Blackburn`s moto vehicle fleet.

  • They call your generation debt. Does it worry you at all?

  • By the decisions that I`ve made with school, not really,

  • because going to Blackburn I know I`m saving a lot of money.

  • I came for the work program because I felt that with baseball and school

  • and a job I wouldn`t have time to get distracted by videogames,

  • or going out to parties. I actually went to (INAUDIBLE) University.

  • They had big pools, nice buildings, newer dorms, but it was kind of a distraction.

  • I`m here for an education.

  • Our transcript page at cnnstudentnews.com is the place we look for your "Roll Call" requests.

  • We got one all the way from Yokosuka yesterday.

  • It`s a seaport in Japan where you`ll find the Yokosuka Naval Base

  • and where we are glad to be part of the day at Nile C. Kinnick High School.

  • Mannford, Oklahoma is next. Mannford Middle School is there.

  • And the pirates are watching today. And we`ll wrap things up in Doral, Florida.

  • We`ve got the firebirds. They are at Doral Academy Preparatory School.

  • Quick, what`s one food you can`t leave without?

  • Well, there is no one food we can`t leave without.

  • But there`s a food that enlivens a love for eating among those eaters

  • who love it that you probably never think would run out: chocolate.

  • A new report indicates there could be a shortage on the horizon.

  • Will it lead to an apocalypse?

  • The first problem is us. According to "The Washington Post"

  • world citizens consumed all of the cocoa produced last year,

  • and then consumed and additional 70,000 metric tons.

  • Yes, tons from our reserves. There are a whole bunch of new chocoholics in India

  • and China who want to partake as well.

  • and China who want to partake as well.

  • Chocolate giants Mars Incorporated, maker of M&Ms, Snickers

  • and Three Musketeers is among the chocolate makers who have predicted

  • that if we continue to gorge ourselves at the current rate,

  • demand for chocolate will outpace supply by 2 million metric tons by 2030.

  • Now, the international cocoa organization is downplaying these projections calling them very overstated.

  • Everyone else I talked to said, good luck with that.

  • There really are reasons to be concerned.

  • As the world population gets bigger, and emerging markets continue to grow and gain wealth,

  • they are eating chocolate, and we are running out.

  • But it`s not all our fault or that of our appetite.

  • The second threat to our beloved cocoa bean is nature.

  • Droughts and a crop decimating disease called frosty pod (ph) have left supplies low.

  • So, what is a chocoholic consumer to expect?

  • Well, higher prices and less flavor for starters.

  • As growers start to grow new more productive variety,

  • we are going to end up doing the chocolate what we`ve done to tomatoes,

  • what we`ve done to chicken, what we`ve done to strawberries.

  • We are going to turn into carryboard (ph), and that is the scariest thing of all.

  • Before we go, he`s 6 foot 8 and 186 pounds.

  • But he`s just a baby. We are talking about Buttercup.

  • He`s the giraffe on the right. At four days old, he`d never been outside.

  • You are seeing him take his first steps out of the barn at the Santa Barbara Zoo.

  • He`s feeling the wind for the first time.

  • Hearing the birds for the first time. And though he may look a little awkward

  • , he seems pretty comfortable in his adventure.

  • Seems like a pretty giraffable guy, not afraid to stick his neck out,

  • explore new heights, hoof it around the habitat.

  • It`s no tall tale that from head to tail Buttercup`s buttered up viewers at the zoo.

  • CNN STUDENT NEWS hopes to see you Friday.

I`m Carl Azuz. And welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS. First up this Thursday, November 20th.

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2014年11月20日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (November 20, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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