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  • Back to school season can mean back to school colds.

  • We are going to tell you what to watch out for today on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome into the show.

  • On average, you can expect to get about four to six colds per year, and you`ve heard how to avoid them, wash your hands with soap.

  • On average, you can expect to get about four to six colds per year, and you`ve heard how to avoid them, wash your hands with soap.

  • If you haven`t done that, don`t touch your face or your food.

  • If you haven`t done that, don`t touch your face or your food.

  • Don`t kiss or drink after people who are sick.

  • There`s a virus that`s been spreading in some parts of the U.S.

  • It`s called enterovirus. It`s common.

  • And it`s usually not deadly, but a particular strain of enterovirus has sent hundreds of kids to the hospital this summer.

  • One doctor says many of the cases she`s seen are from children who have a history of breathing problems like asthma or wheezing.

  • So, if you have asthma, doctors say it`s important to keep taking your medication.

  • Other signs to watch out for in this particular strain of enterovirus include coughing, fever or getting a rash.

  • This particular virus is called enterovirus D 68, and they are seeing it mostly in the Midwest and the Southeast.

  • There are dozens and dozens of different types of enteroviruses and they cause different kinds of symptoms.

  • Some cause respiratory symptoms, others might cause gastrointestinal symptoms.

  • And often an enterovirus is really no big deal. If you`ve ever had a summer cold, there`s a very good chance that that was caused by an enterovirus.

  • But there`s something about D68 that makes it worse.

  • There`s something about this particular type of enterovirus that gives much more severe symptoms that often land people in the hospitals.

  • For example, let`s just look at Mercy Hospital, it`s a children`s hospital in Kansas City, Missouri.

  • They`ve had more than 400 children in the hospital with signs of this virus.

  • 60 of those children have ended up in intensive care,

  • and this is the important part: that`s been in less than a month.

  • That`s pretty severe. Pediatricians there say they`ve never seen anything like it.

  • This type of enterovirus has been around since the 1960s,

  • it`s popped up here and there in the United States and in other countries as well.

  • They don`t know why it`s gotten so bad this year.

  • When your parents tell you school is expensive, here`s what they mean:

  • five things to know about back to school shopping.

  • One, it actually impacts the economy. The U.S. back to school season is second only to the Christmas season for retail shopping.

  • Two, the cost of school supplies has skyrocketed.

  • The National Retail Federation says it`s gone up by almost 50 percent in five years.

  • Three, this year American shoppers will spend over $26.5 billion on 50 million public school students.

  • That works out to #530 per student.

  • Four, electronics are the most expensive back to school items, no surprise.

  • But clothes or school uniforms account for over 200 bucks per student.

  • Shoes, an average of $116, and stuff like bags, books and lunchboxes add another 100 bucks a student.

  • Five, some parents are trying to keep their cost down.

  • About a third say they plan to spend less this year.

  • How?

  • One way is by buying generic items instead of big brands.

  • One way is by buying generic items instead of big brands.

  • An ancient Egyptian mummy once had a passport.

  • In the 1970s, scientists flew the remains of Ramesses II to France for examination.

  • It was given a passport that read King Deceased. Now, that`s random.

  • Next story today takes us to Southeast Asia where the annual monsoon rains have brought misery and destruction.

  • Hundreds of people have died in flooding in India and Pakistan.

  • Tens of thousands have had to leave their homes, and this is in an area that`s used to wet weather in late summer.

  • What`s making things worse this time around, besides record amounts of rainfall, is the fact that roads and bridges have been washed out.

  • So aid workers have trouble getting help to the people who needed it.

  • Normally the monsoon has eased by early September.

  • Heavy rainfall is still in the forecast for days to come.

  • India is the world`s most populated country, but about 30 percent of that population leaves below the poverty line.

  • India is the world`s most populated country, but about 30 percent of that population leaves below the poverty line.

  • Twice that of the U.S. It explains why in some areas electricity is still the way of the future.

  • In much of rural India, this is how women step out at night.

  • This is how children do their homework.

  • A fourth of India`s 1.2 billion people have no access to electricity, and in this state of Bihar, one of India`s poorest, more than 80 percent live in darkness.

  • We always used to wonder what it would be like to have light, how wonderful life would be, she says.

  • For decades, Charnai was just another one of Bihar`s 19,000 villages without electricity.

  • Government owned power lines stopped working decades ago.

  • This village has everything: it has a school, it has a hospital, it has a railway station,

  • but one thing is holding them back, that of electricity.

  • Greenpeace India along with other local nongovernmental organizations turned Charnai into a pilot project to see how power can make a difference.

  • In this village of 2200 people, 60 solar street (INAUDIBLE) have been set up, and every single household now has access to power, 24/7.

  • With India`s ever increasing population and insufficient resources, Greenpeace says the country needs to look at alternative energy.

  • In July, Charnai became energy independent.

  • Suddenly it feels like light has come into our lives.

  • Our children can study easily, we can walk around freely.

  • We are finally happy he says. It still far from developed.

  • The villages now have access to basic (INAUDIBLE) of modernity.

  • The ability to charge a mobile phones at homes, fans in temperatures that often hit 40 degrees Celsius, even computers and most of all, confidence that they are now part of the new India.

  • Next up today, Northern California, it`s where you`ll find Yosemite National Park.

  • It`s also where historic drought has made conditions perfect for wildfires.

  • Around 100 hikers found that out this week.

  • A wildfire that started on Sunday near the Half Dome peak in Yosemite`s wilderness quickly scorched the equivalent of 700 football fields of land.

  • Suddenly, dozens of hikers in the park were in need of rescue. Officials don`t know yet what caused the fire, but the parched earth combined with whipping winds helped it spread.

  • One rescued hiker felt fortunate, not just to be out of danger, but for the sunset ride he got in a rescue helicopter.

  • Those are playing in number of important roles in disaster areas.

  • This is the firehawk, one of the most powerful firefighting tools in the skies of California.

  • Record heats, strong winds and low humidity are fueling several fires across southern California.

  • There`ve been some 25,000 wildfires in the U.S. this year.

  • And more than 2500 of those have been in California.

  • Burning over 18,000 acres.

  • As the state suffers one of the worst droughts on record, it`s leveraging crafts like this modified Blackhawk to combat would could be a record breaking fire season.

  • This firehawk has a retractable hose that can suck up 1,000 gallons of water in just one minute.

  • Its engine is optimized to withstand temperature over 1500 degrees Fahrenheit, and it can hit 183 miles per hour.

  • Traditionally, airplanes have been a main aerial tool in this dangerous firefight.

  • But helicopters have proven to be useful as well. The National Guard in New York, Oregon, Nevada and Florida each operate firehawks.

  • Besides dropping water, helicopters can touch down in mountainous terrain and perform critical rescue missions.

  • Firehawks have also been used in natural disaster relief and were used in the recovery efforts following Hurricane Katrina.

  • From Tuesday`s transcript page at cnnstudentnews.com, here are three of the thousands of requests we`ve got for the Roll Call.

  • The students at Gwacheon Foreign Language High School are watching.

  • It`s great to see all of you in Gwacheon, South Korea.

  • Across the Pacific and moving inland to St. Louis, Missouri, hello to the Panthers of Mehlville High School.

  • And on the East Coast, in Seaford, Delaware, we`ve got the blue jays on our roll. They are perched at Seaford Middle School.

  • One is a Democrat, one is a Republican both spent eight years leading the U.S.

  • And they appeared together Monday to promote a new scholarship program.

  • Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton have grown closer since their time in office.

  • We were laughing about going to restaurants and having to spend our time taking selfies with people.

  • At least they are still asking, you know.

  • Yeah, that`s right.

  • Kind of makes you wonder who set the precedent for that. It`s good to see their camaraderie over it.

  • Could you call that photosynthesis?

  • I really wanted to plant that pun, though I`m not show it was fully developed.

  • NEWS returns tomorrow. I hope you`ll be watching.

Back to school season can mean back to school colds.

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2014年9月10日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (September 10, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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