Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • July 1970.

    1970年7月

  • Two American Congressmen are among a delegation that is visiting Côn Sơn Prison in South

    アメリカの2人の議員をはじめとする一行が、南カリフォルニアのCôn Sơn刑務所を訪問しています。

  • Vietnam.

    ベトナムです。

  • They are getting the guided tour when one of the Americans pulls out a hand-drawn map

    ガイドツアーを受けている時に、アメリカ人の一人が手書きの地図を取り出した。

  • a former prisoner had given him.

    元囚人からもらったものだ。

  • The map shows a secret part of the prison.

    地図には刑務所の秘密の部分が描かれています。

  • That's where they want to go.

    そこに行きたいと思っている。

  • As they open a door, they begin to hear a chorus of moans.

    扉を開けると、うめき声のようなものが聞こえてくる。

  • People are crying out for what the Americans are told is water.

    アメリカ人が言われている水を求めて、人々が泣いている。

  • As they walk farther into the room, what they see they can't believe.

    部屋の奥に進むと、そこには信じられないような光景が広がっていました。

  • Women and men trapped in cages.

    檻の中に閉じ込められた女性や男性。

  • Some are beaten, mutilated, their bodies covered in sores.

    殴られたり、体を傷つけられたり、体中がただれたようになっている人もいます。

  • The translator looks at one of the congressmen and says, “Tiger Cage.”

    通訳が一人の議員を見て、"Tiger Cage "と言う。

  • The two congressmen were Augustus Hawkins and William Anderson.

    その2人のコングレスとは、オーガスタス・ホーキンスとウィリアム・アンダーソンである。

  • They were accompanied by the USAID Office of Public Safety Director Frank Walton, as

    彼らには、USAID公共安全局のフランク・ウォルトン局長が同行しました。

  • well as Tom Harkin, who would later serve on the United States Senate.

    また、後に上院議員となるトム・ハーキンも参加しています。

  • Their translator and assistant for the day was Don Luce, a man that would soon relinquish

    この日の通訳兼アシスタントはドン・ルーチェだったが、彼はすぐに引退してしまう。

  • his support for the American war effort.

    彼はアメリカの戦争を支持していました。

  • He has a controversial story to tell, but we'll save that until the end.

    彼には物議を醸す話がありますが、それは最後までとっておきましょう。

  • The Vietnam War was in full swing.

    ベトナム戦争が本格化してきた。

  • That's why in those cages were people considered the enemy of the US and the Republic of Vietnam.

    だからこそ、あの檻の中には、アメリカとベトナム共和国の敵と見なされた人々がいたのだ。

  • The delegation didn't fully understand the ongoing atrocities committed in the prison,

    代表団は、刑務所内で行われている残虐行為を十分に理解していなかった。

  • and as you'll see soon, other prisons.

    また、すぐに分かるように、他の刑務所もあります。

  • That day, Tom Harkin took the photos, which were later published in a Life magazine article

    この日、トム・ハーキンが撮影した写真は、後にライフ誌の記事に掲載された。

  • titled, “The Tiger Cages of Con Son.”

    タイトルは「The Tiger Cages of Con Son」。

  • The article appalled many people in the US, folks who had no idea that such inhumane treatment

    この記事は、米国の多くの人々を驚かせました。彼らは、このような非人道的な扱いを知らなかったのです。

  • of prisoners was happening in South Vietnam.

    南ベトナムでは捕虜の解放が行われていた。

  • They became even more appalled later when released prisoners talked about what had happened

    後日、釈放された囚人たちの話を聞いて、彼らはさらに愕然とした。

  • to them.

    と言っていました。

  • But first, let's talk more about what the delegation saw that day.

    その前に、代表団がその日見たものについて詳しくお話しましょう。

  • This part of the prison that was not on the guided tour was the punishment block.

    ガイドツアーに参加していないこの部分は、刑務所の中でも特に懲罰ブロックでした。

  • It was a room with about 120 cells.

    120個くらいのセルがある部屋でした。

  • These weren't ordinary cells, though.

    しかし、これは普通の細胞ではない。

  • They were basically pits in the ground, each with an iron grid for a ceiling.

    基本的には地面に穴が開いていて、天井には鉄格子がついていた。

  • That made it possible for guards to walk over the cells and look inside, perhaps now and

    そのため、警備員が独房の上を歩いて中を見ることができるようになりました。

  • again, throw some food down there...or worse.

    また、そこに食べ物を投げ入れる......いや、もっとひどい。

  • Many of them were open to the sunlight all day, and in Vietnam, that sun can be pretty

    その多くは、一日中、太陽の光にさらされていましたが、ベトナムでは、その太陽の光はかなりのものです。

  • damn strong.

    凄く強い。

  • These cells were mockingly nicknamed thesunbathecells.

    この独房は、「日光浴」というあだ名で呼ばれていた。

  • Anyone who's ever been foolish enough to sit under the tropical sun from dawn until

    南国の太陽の下で夜明けから夜明けまで座っていた愚かな人なら誰でも

  • dusk will know what damage that can cause.

    duskは、それがどんなダメージを与えるかを知っているだろう。

  • We should say here that these cells weren't the creation of the Vietnamese.

    ここで言っておきたいのは、この細胞はベトナム人が作ったものではないということだ。

  • The French first made theTiger cellswhen they were in Vietnam, doing all the terrible

    フランスが最初に「タイガーセル」を作ったのは、ベトナムに行ったときで、ひどいことをやっていた。

  • things colonists tend to do from time to time.

    植民地の人々がよくやることだ。

  • The Americans described the cells as being around five feet wide, six feet long, and

    アメリカ人の説明によると、その細胞は幅5フィート、長さ6フィート、そして

  • six feet deep.

    6フィートの深さ。

  • That wasn't much space when there were usually six or seven prisoners wallowing down there.

    いつもは6、7人の囚人がうずくまっているのに、それほど大きなスペースではなかった。

  • We don't need to tell you that the cells weren't fitted with modern conveniences,

    独房に現代的な設備が整っていないことは、今さら言うまでもない。

  • so the stench from human waste was unbearable.

    そのため、人間の排泄物による悪臭は耐え難いものがありました。

  • As for who was down there, it included anyone accused of being Communists.

    誰がそこにいたかというと、共産主義者だと非難された人も含まれていた。

  • Sometimes families were imprisoned; other times student activists were rounded up and

    時には家族が投獄され、時には学生運動家が検挙されて

  • sent to the prison, sometimes spending years down there without ever having a trial.

    刑務所に送られ、時には裁判を受けずに何年も過ごすこともありました。

  • Let's now talk about torture.

    ここで、拷問の話をしましょう。

  • The tiger cells, as we said, were a punishment block.

    虎の子の房は、言ってみればお仕置き用のブロックだった。

  • But they weren't always just punishment in themselves; rather they were a holding

    しかし、それは必ずしも罰そのものではなく、むしろそれを保持するためのものでした。

  • house.

    の家です。

  • One former prisoner said he wasbeaten and tortured on and off for a whole year.”

    ある元囚人は、"丸1年間、延々と殴られ、拷問を受け続けた "と語っています。

  • He said, at times, he'd have soapy water forced into his mouth and eyes.

    時には石鹸水を口や目に押し付けられたこともあったという。

  • He said other times he was electrocuted.

    他にも感電したこともあったそうです。

  • On other occasions, he was beaten with sticks until, he said, hevomited blood or until

    他にも、「血を吐くまで、または血を吐くまで」棒で殴られたこともあったそうです。

  • the blood came out of my eyes or ears.”

    目からも耳からも血が出た」。

  • Another former inmate described having his hands handcuffed behind his back and then

    別の元収容者は、両手を後ろに手錠をかけられた上に

  • being suspended with his arms from the ceiling.

    天井から腕を吊るされている状態です。

  • That caused incredible pain and usually resulted in him blacking out.

    それは、信じられないほどの痛みを伴い、たいていはブラックアウトしてしまいます。

  • In his own words, he said, “There they chained our feet and attached the chains to a pole.

    彼の言葉を借りれば、「そこでは足を鎖でつながれ、その鎖を棒につけられた。

  • There were between 50 and 100 prisoners.

    囚人は50人から100人いた。

  • We had nothing to lie on, and it was filthy and dirty and cold.

    横になるものもなく、不潔で汚くて寒かった。

  • Every day they would open the door and send in a bunch of common criminals who would beat

    毎日、ドアを開けては、常習犯たちを送り込み、殴り合いをしていた。

  • us with sticks and kick us.”

    棒を持って蹴ったりしていました。

  • He said he saw several people die in the tiger cages.

    虎の檻の中で何人もの人が死ぬのを見たという。

  • Others lost the use of their limbs, with one man saying he and many others were disabled

    また、手足を失った人もいて、ある男性は「自分と多くの人が障害を負った」と語っていました。

  • after the beatings.

    殴られた後

  • He said, “We were still sick and needed more time to recover.

    彼は、「私たちはまだ病気で、回復にはもっと時間が必要だった。

  • We told them many of us still could not walk and many were still very sick.”

    私たちは、多くの人がまだ歩けず、多くの人が重い病気にかかっていることを伝えました。

  • He then dropped this bombshell.

    そして、こんな爆弾発言をした。

  • He said the old tiger cages were being replaced by new ones, with the new torture cells paid

    古い虎の檻が新しいものに変わり、新しい拷問房が支払われるようになったという。

  • for by the US and built by an American contractor.

    米国が資金を提供し、米国の請負業者が建設した。

  • That contractor we discovered after some research was the construction consortium, Raymond.

    調べて分かったその業者は、建設コンソシアムのレイモンド社でした。

  • Morrison, Knudsen, Brown, Root, and Jones.

    モリソン、クヌードセン、ブラウン、ルート、ジョーンズ。

  • The deal was worth $400,000 and was paid for by the US military.

    この取引は40万ドル(約4,000万円)で、米軍から支払われたものだ。

  • That's about $2.7 million in today's money, a mere speck in the vast and costly tapestry

    これは現在の貨幣価値で約270万ドルであり、膨大な費用のかかるタペストリーの中ではほんの一片に過ぎない。

  • of war.

    戦争の

  • These new cages were smaller, so only one prisoner stayed in them at a time.

    この新しい檻は小さく、一度に一人の囚人しか入れないようになっていた。

  • But this created another kind of evil.

    しかし、これは別の種類の悪を生み出した。

  • The guards would open the iron grills and jump in with the prisoner, beating him senseless.

    看守は鉄格子を開けて、囚人と一緒に飛び込んできて、無感覚に打ちのめす。

  • The prisoners were so weak they couldn't fight.

    囚人たちは弱っていて戦えなかった。

  • Each day they were only given enough water to barely survive.

    毎日、生きていくのに十分な水しか与えられなかった。

  • Food-wise, they were given two spoons of rice.

    食べ物では、スプーン2杯の米が与えられた。

  • That is hardly enough calories to sustain human life.

    これでは人間の生命を維持するのに十分なカロリーとは言えません。

  • That same prisoner said they received more beatingsbecause we asked for more food

    その囚人は、「もっと食べ物をくれと言ったから、もっと殴られた」と言っていました。

  • and more water.”

    と水の量を増やしています。

  • He said a man named Le Van An was beaten to death, and so was a Buddhist monk.

    レ・ヴァン・アンという男性が殴り殺され、仏教徒の僧侶も殺されたという。

  • When investigations into the torture and deaths happened later, all the prisoners told the

    後日、拷問や死に関する調査が行われた際には、すべての囚人たちが

  • same story.

    と同じ話です。

  • One of them said, “Each of us went through a similar ordeal.”

    その中の一人が、"それぞれが同じような試練を経験した "と言っていました。

  • It's hard to say just how many political prisoners were held on both sides of the war.

    双方の戦争でどれだけの政治犯が拘束されたかは、一概には言えません。

  • The Saigon government said the number was 5,000, but the New York Times in1973 said

    サイゴン政府は5,000人と言っていたが、1973年のニューヨーク・タイムズ紙は

  • it was more like 20-30,000, with some estimates being as high as 200,000.

    2〜3万人、中には20万人とも言われています。

  • These were secretive times indeed, but those released from those prisons stood up later

    秘密の時代ではあったが、刑務所から出てきた人たちは後に立ち上がった。

  • and described in horrific detail what had happened to them.

    と、自分の身に起きたことを恐ろしいほど詳細に語っていた。

  • The Times published an article on July 11, 1970, with the headline, “Saigon Is Investigating

    タイムズ紙は1970年7月11日、「サイゴンは調査中」という見出しの記事を掲載した。

  • 'Tiger Cage' Cells at a Prison.”

    タイガーケージ」刑務所の独房 "

  • Partway down the story is this paragraph, “The Government has already confirmed that

    この記事の一部には、「政府はすでに確認している」という段落があります。

  • the small, crowded 'tiger cage' cells exist and that they contain about 400 prisoners

    狭くて混雑した「虎の檻」と呼ばれる独房が存在し、そこには約400人の囚人がいること。

  • who refuse to obey the prison authorities.”

    囚人たちは、刑務所当局に従わない。

  • It said the prisoners were shackled, beaten, and did not receive enough food or water to

    囚人たちは手錠をかけられ、殴られ、十分な食料や水も与えられなかったという。

  • sustain anything near good health.

    健康に近い状態を維持しています。

  • When the South Vietnamese government was asked about this, it responded by saying prisoners

    このことを南ベトナム政府に問うと、囚人たちはこう答えたという。

  • in those cages had not saluted the national flag.

    檻の中の人たちは、国旗に敬意を払わなかった。

  • But from what we can see, there was some amount of sadism going on in those wretched punishment

    しかし、私たちが見る限りでは、あの悲惨な刑罰の中には、ある程度のサディズムがあったと思われます。

  • blocks.

    のブロックがあります。

  • Indeed, after three students from Saigon University were released from prison, they said the government

    実際、サイゴン大学の3人の学生が刑務所から釈放された後、彼らは政府が

  • had not beentelling the truth”.

    は「本当のことを言っていない」と思っていた。

  • They said they believed the number of prisoners was way higher than the government had said,

    彼らは、囚人の数は政府の発表よりもはるかに多いと信じていると言った。

  • stating the number was 11,200.

    と言っていましたが、11,200人でした。

  • Speaking on behalf of those students was a man named Cao Nguyen Loi.

    その学生を代表して発言したのが、カオ・グエン・ロイという男だった。

  • He said he'd spent 13 months in a tiger cage for nothing more than joining a peace

    平和運動に参加しただけなのに、虎の檻に13ヶ月も入れられていたそうです。

  • protest.

    の抗議をしています。

  • Women got the same treatment as men.

    女性も男性と同じように扱われていました。

  • Here is one testimony from a former female prisoner:

    元女性囚人の証言を一つ紹介します。

  • In prison, sometimes they made my sister or me witness the torture of the other.

    「牢屋の中では、姉や私が相手の拷問を目撃することもありました。

  • When I saw them beat my sister, it was very painful.

    姉を殴っているのを見たときは、とても辛かったです。

  • They put us in the Tiger Cages, and when I came to my senses I thought I fell into Hell

    タイガーケージに入れられ、正気に戻った時には地獄に落ちたと思った。

  • because the cage was the shape of a coffin.”

    ケージが棺桶の形をしていたからです。

  • There's a kind of happy ending to her story, though.

    しかし、彼女の物語にはある種のハッピーエンドがあります。

  • She also said she was released.

    解放されたとも言っていました。

  • She wrote, “The happiness made tears pour down.

    嬉しさのあまり涙が溢れてきた」と書いています。

  • I couldn't walk.

    歩けなかった。

  • I was paralyzed.

    私は麻痺していた。

  • I was cured in months after, but at the time of my liberation, my legs were still very

    数ヶ月後には完治しましたが、解放された時には、まだ足がとても

  • weak.”

    弱い」。

  • As for other kinds of tiger cages, you can look no further than Phu Quoc Prison.

    他の種類の虎の檻としては、フーコック刑務所が挙げられます。

  • It housed mostly Viet Cong and North Vietnamese soldiers, some of whom held a high rank.

    ここには主にベトコンや北ベトナムの兵士が収容されており、中には高い階級の人もいた。

  • Today, the prison is a museum that shows how conditions were back then, replete with tiger

    現在、刑務所は当時の様子を伝える博物館となっており、虎の絵が飾られています。

  • cages.

    のケージを使用しています。

  • These cages were no hole in the ground, and they certainly weren't large enough for

    このケージは、地面に穴を開けたものではなく、またその大きさも

  • a bunch of guards to get in there and commit themselves to an orgy of violence.

    そのためには、大勢の警備員が中に入って乱痴気騒ぎをしなければならない。

  • They must, however, have been an awful way to spend time.

    しかし、このような時間の過ごし方は、きっと素晴らしいものだったに違いない。

  • Under the sun all day, at the mercy of guard's sticks, biting ants, snakes, and likely the

    一日中太陽の下で、警備員の棒に翻弄され、噛みつきアリや蛇、そしておそらくは

  • occasional giant centipede.

    時折、巨大なムカデが出てきます。

  • Today, you can visit the prison website, which shows one man-like doll in a tiger cage who

    現在、刑務所のウェブサイトを見ることができますが、そこには虎の檻の中に入っている一人の人間のような人形が写っています。

  • looks like he's supposed to be dead.

    は、死んだはずの人のように見えます。

  • If he's not, he's missing half a leg and is covered in cuts and bruises.

    もしそうでなければ、彼は足を半分失い、切り傷やあざにまみれている。

  • Below the photo is the text, “At that time, thousands of prisoners died in the prison

    写真の下には、「当時、何千人もの囚人が刑務所で死んでいた」という文章があります。

  • because they couldn't stand tortures.”

    拷問に耐えられなかったからだ」。

  • In quite disturbing detail, the website talks about punishments that happened outside of

    の外で行われた処罰について、かなり気になる内容が書かれています。

  • the tiger cages.

    THE TIGER CAGE(ザ・タイガー・ケージ)。

  • It shows one prisoner being blinded by high-powered lights.

    一人の囚人が高出力のライトで目をつぶる様子が映っている。

  • Another picture shows a guard popping out a man's teeth with a stick.

    また、警備員が棒で男性の歯を抜いている写真もあります。

  • If that isn't bad enough, another prisoner is wrapped in a sack and is being placed on

    さらには、別の囚人が袋に包まれて

  • a large, heated pan.

    熱した大きな鍋に入れます。

  • This kind of thing never happened in the US, or at least we don't think it did.

    このようなことはアメリカでは起きなかったし、少なくとも私たちはそうは思っていない。

  • But listen to what an academic wrote about those days in Vietnam.

    しかし、ある学者がベトナムでの当時のことを書いた文章を聞いてみてください。

  • In a paper published by the University of California Press, he wrote:

    カリフォルニア大学出版局から発表された論文の中で、彼はこう書いている。

  • The Republic of Vietnam, or South Vietnam, operated this prison under close advisement

    "ベトナム共和国(南ベトナム)"は、この刑務所を厳重に管理していました。

  • of the United States.

    米国の

  • In fact, this prison was part of the mass incarceration system that Vietnam built in

    実際、この刑務所は、ベトナムで構築された大量収容システムの一部でした。

  • the 1960s, with the help of U.S. law-enforcement experts and funding from the CIA.”

    1960年代に、米国の法執行機関の専門家の協力とCIAの資金援助を得て、"

  • The writer also says guards would walk above the cages and throw quick lime over everyone.

    檻の上を警備員が歩いて、みんなにクイックライムをかけていたとも書かれている。

  • Prolonged exposure to quick lime causes burns, and the people in the cells had no water to

    生石灰を長時間浴びると火傷をしますが、独房の中では水もなく

  • wash with.

    で洗います。

  • The academic also adds something to the story regarding when the US delegation went there.

    アメリカの代表団がいつそこに行ったのかということについても、学者が何かを付け加えている。

  • He said that everyone who'd arrived from the US was appalled by what they saw.

    アメリカから到着した人たちは皆、その光景を見て愕然としたという。

  • Nevertheless, he said, the delegationminimizedthe conditions in their official report.

    それにもかかわらず、代表団は公式報告書の中で条件を「最小化」していたという。

  • As some of you know, much of the USA was against the war in Vietnam.

    ご存知の方もいらっしゃると思いますが、アメリカの多くの人々はベトナム戦争に反対していました。

  • Photos of inhumane conditions in prisons only supported their cause and turned more people

    非人道的な刑務所内の状況を撮影した写真は、彼らの主張を後押しし、より多くの人々を魅了しました。

  • off the war.

    戦争が終わった。

  • That's why the officials kept most of the horrors hush, hush.

    だからこそ、役人たちはほとんどの惨状を口外しなかったのだ。

  • The writer said that Tom Harkin wasn't supposed to publish those photos, but he leaked them

    トム・ハーキンはその写真を公開してはいけないはずなのに、リークしてしまったとライターが言っていました。

  • to Life magazine.

    を「ライフ」誌に掲載しました。

  • After that leak, protests in the US exploded.

    このリークの後、アメリカでは抗議活動が爆発しました。

  • In Boston, activists made mock tiger cages and stayed in them all week.

    ボストンでは、活動家たちが虎の檻を模したものを作り、一週間その中で過ごしました。

  • Even in London, people made cages and sat in them outside of the offices of a contractor

    ロンドンでも、業者の事務所の前にケージを作って座っている人がいました。

  • that built detention facilities.

    拘置所を作った会社

  • We told you we'd come back to that translator named Don Luce.

    ドン・ルースという翻訳者の話に戻ろうと言ったでしょう。

  • Many years later, he wrote that he had a friend who had been tortured to death, but he said

    何年も後になって、彼は、拷問されて死んだ友人がいたと書いていますが、彼は

  • the torture happened under the eyes of American soldiers.

    拷問はアメリカ人兵士の目の前で行われました。

  • He said, “The US paid the salaries of the torturers, taught them new methods, and turned

    彼は、「アメリカは、拷問者の給料を支払い、新しい方法を教えて、転

  • suspects over to the police.

    容疑者を警察に引き渡すことになった。

  • The US authorities were all aware of the torture.”

    米国当局はすべての拷問を知っていた」。

  • After he turned against the war effort, he lost his press pass.

    戦争に反対するようになってから、彼はプレスパスを失った。

  • He became a pariah to the US and the South Vietnamese.

    彼は、アメリカと南ベトナムの亡者となった。

  • One day a friend of his from military intelligence said, “Don, you've got to be more careful.

    ある日、軍情報部の友人が「ドン、君はもっと気をつけないといけないよ」と言った。

  • They're out to get you.”

    彼らはあなたを捕まえようとしている」。

  • This became reality when he discovered a deadlytwo-stepsnake had been planted in his

    それが現実になったのは、彼の家に致命的な「二段構え」の蛇が仕込まれていたことを発見したからだ。

  • bed one day.

    ある日のベッド。

  • He was eventually expelled from Vietnam and had to return to the US.

    結局、彼はベトナムから追放され、アメリカに戻ることになった。

  • A female prisoner named Thieu Thi Tao later wrote that she actually got to speak with

    ティウ・ティ・タオという女性の囚人は、後に「実際に話をすることができた」と書いています。

  • the delegation that day.

    この日の代表団は

  • She was a 16-year old student at the time.

    当時、彼女は16歳の学生だった。

  • This is what she said about her experience: “I still remember the strange foreign voices.

    これは、彼女が体験したことについて語ったものです。「奇妙な外国人の声を今でも覚えています。

  • In the cages, we wondered what new indignities were to be visited upon us.

    檻の中では、どんな新しい侮辱を受けることになるのかと思った。

  • But a foreigner myself who spoke Vietnamese with a heavy accent told us it was a US congressional

    しかし、ベトナム語を話す外国人の私が、「これはアメリカの議会だ」と言ったのです。

  • investigation.

    の調査を行いました。

  • We had prayed for such an inquiry and took the chance to speak of the tortures.

    私たちは、このような問い合わせがあることを祈っていたので、この機会に拷問のことを話しました。

  • We begged for water and food.

    私たちは水や食べ物を乞いました。

  • We were dying, you know.”

    私たちは死にかけていたんだよ」。

  • After the Life magazine exposé, Congressman Philip Crane went to the prison to see what

    雑誌「ライフ」に掲載された後、フィリップ・クレーン下院議員が刑務所を訪れて

  • was up.

    が上がりました。

  • His remarks have since been called racist, and he obviously either lied or wasn't shown

    その後、彼の発言は人種差別的だと言われ、彼は明らかに嘘をついたか、見せられなかった。

  • something similar to what had been happening before.

    これまでと同じようなことが起こっている。

  • He said, “The tiger cages are cleaner than the average Vietnamese home.”

    彼は、"虎の檻は、ベトナムの一般家庭よりもきれいだ "と言っていました。

  • This didn't convince the activists, of course.

    もちろん、それだけでは活動家たちは納得しない。

  • We'll finish with a quote that Don Luce liked to say at times, in reference to the

    最後に、ドン・ルーシーが時折好んで言っていた言葉をご紹介します。

  • war.

    戦をしています。

  • It's from the poetry of the Vietnamese Buddhist monk, Thich Nhat Hanh:

    ベトナムの僧侶、ティク・ナット・ハン氏の詩からです。

  • Remember, brother, remember.

    "Remember, brother, remember.

  • Man is not our enemy.”

    人間は我々の敵ではない」。

  • Now you need to watch, “50 Insane Facts About Vietnam War You Didn't Know.”

    今度は、"50 Insane Facts About Vietnam War You Didn't Know "を見てみましょう。

  • Or, have a look at...

    または、見てみてください。

July 1970.

1970年7月

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 ベトナム 囚人 刑務 ケージ アメリカ 独房

タイガー・ケージ - 人類史上最悪の処罰 (Tiger Cage - Worst Punishments in the History of Mankind)

  • 6 0
    Summer に公開 2021 年 09 月 21 日
動画の中の単語