Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • A 23-year old man sits in a prison cell with the widest smile painted across his face.

    23歳の男が、満面の笑みを浮かべて刑務所の独房に座っている。

  • Clasped in his right hand is a toy train.

    右手に持っているのは電車のおもちゃ。

  • He pushes it right up to his eyes, saying hi to the little people he imagines are in

    彼はそれを目の前まで押して、中にいると想像している小さな人たちに挨拶します。

  • the carriages.

    キャリッジを使用しています。

  • He winds it up and sets it off down the landing, giggling with excitement as he does so.

    彼はそれを巻いて踊り場に置いて、興奮して笑っている。

  • A few seconds later, another prisoner sends the train back to his cell.

    数秒後、別の囚人が列車を自分の部屋に送り返す。

  • It's hard to believe he's about to face the gas chamber.

    これからガス室に入るとは思えないほどだ。

  • It's even harder to believe he's been convicted of an extremely grizzly ax murder.

    非常にグリグリした斧の殺人事件で有罪になったとは、なおさら信じられません。

  • He might be guilty as charged, but he's liked by all the guards and the warden.

    彼は罪を犯しているかもしれないが、看守や所長には好かれている。

  • That warden in fact calls this manthe happiest prisoner on death row.”

    その所長は、実際にこの男を「死刑囚の中で最も幸せな囚人」と呼んでいる。

  • This is the story of a man named Joe Arridy.

    これは、ジョー・アリディという男の物語である。

  • He was born in 1915 in Pueblo, Colorado, to parents Henry and Mary.

    1915年、コロラド州プエブロで、ヘンリーとメアリーの両親のもとに生まれました。

  • Both were immigrants from Syria who'd gone to the USA to make a better life for themselves.

    2人ともシリアからの移民で、より良い生活をするためにアメリカに渡ったのです。

  • It was tough at first, but Henry's job at a steel mill afforded the family certain luxuries

    最初は大変だったが、ヘンリーの製鉄所での仕事のおかげで、一家は贅沢な生活を送ることができた。

  • they hadn't had before.

    今までになかった。

  • There was a problem, though, with their young son.

    しかし、そこには幼い息子の問題があった。

  • They knew very well that Joe wasn't like a lot of the other kids, a conviction which

    彼らは、ジョーが他の多くの子供たちとは違うことをよく知っていました。

  • was substantiated when his elementary school principal one day approached Henry and Mary

    は、ある日、小学校の校長先生がヘンリーとメアリーに声をかけたことで立証されました。

  • and told them that Joe wasn't able to learn with the other kids.

    と、ジョーが他の子供たちと一緒に学ぶことができなかったことを伝えました。

  • He could barely string a sentence together, never mind wrestle with difficult spelling

    彼は文章を作るのがやっとで、難しいスペルを覚えることもできませんでした。

  • and arithmetic.

    と算術を駆使します。

  • His parents thought the best thing for Joe was to send him to a school that could better

    両親は、ジョーのためには、より良い教育を受けられる学校に通わせるのが一番だと考えていた。

  • deal with his learning difficulties, so off he was packed to theState Home and Training

    彼の学習障害に対処するため、彼は「State Home and Training」に詰め込まれました。

  • School for Mental Defectives.”

    精神的欠陥のある人のための学校"

  • Only this place was not salubrious in the least for young Joe.

    ただ、この場所は、若いジョーにとっては、少しも良い環境ではなかった。

  • Being short and having prominent ears, Joe was the target of bullying from other kids

    背が低く、耳が突出していたジョーは、他の子供たちからいじめの対象となっていた。

  • in the home.

    を家庭内に設置しました。

  • He suffered beatings at the bully's hands, just as he did when he returned to his neighborhood.

    彼は、近所に戻ったときと同じように、いじめっ子の手で殴られて苦しんだ。

  • Even the adults were unkind, some of them laughing whenSlow Joewalked down the

    大人たちも不親切で、「スロー・ジョー」が歩いてくると笑っている人もいました。

  • street.

    の通りです。

  • Such were the times.

    そんな時代だった。

  • When he was 21, he just picked up and left, jumping on a freight rail car, not knowing

    21歳の時には、何も知らずに貨物列車に飛び乗って出て行ってしまいました。

  • where it would take him.

    それが彼をどこへ連れて行くのか。

  • He ended up in the railyards of Cheyenne in the state of Wyoming, wandering around, trying

    彼は、ワイオミング州シャイアンの車両基地にたどり着き、放浪の旅に出た。

  • his best to find food and shelter.

    食べるもの、住むところを探すのに一生懸命だった。

  • That's when the cops picked him up and his life went from bad to worse.

    その時、警察に捕まり、彼の人生は悪い方向に向かった。

  • Those cops had been looking for someone, a man presumably, who'd committed horrendous

    その警官たちは、恐らく恐ろしいことをした男を探していたのだろう。

  • crimes about 200 miles away in Pueblo, Colorado.

    約200マイル離れたコロラド州プエブロで犯罪が発生しました。

  • They soon found out that Joe came from Pueblo, and what's more, a railcar ran from there

    ジョーはプエブロ出身で、しかもプエブロから鉄道が走っていることがわかった。

  • to Cheyenne.

    シャイアンへ

  • That was enough to put Joe in handcuffs.

    それだけで、ジョーは手錠をかけられてしまった。

  • The crimes had indeed been extreme, and certainly enough for the public to put pressure on the

    確かに犯罪は過激で、世間が圧力をかけるには十分であった。

  • authorities.

    の権限を持っています。

  • No one in Pueblo went to bed feeling safe.

    プエブロでは、誰もが安心して眠りにつくことができなかった。

  • That was because someone had entered a house owned by the Drain family.

    それは、ドレイン家の家に誰かが入ってきたからである。

  • It was nighttime and the parents were at a dance.

    夜になって、両親がダンスをしていた。

  • Their two daughters, Dorothy and Barbara, were sound asleep at home.

    二人の娘、ドロシーとバーバラは、家でぐっすりと眠っていた。

  • A mad man entered the house and bludgeoned them with an ax, killing Dorothy and severely

    狂った男が家に入り、斧で二人を殴り、ドロシーを殺し、重傷を負わせた。

  • injuring Barbara.

    バーバラに怪我をさせてしまった。

  • Cheyenne Sheriff, George Carroll, looking at Joe, thought he was a misfit.

    シャイアンの保安官、ジョージ・キャロルは、ジョーを見て、彼は不適合者だと思った。

  • Not only was he disheveled in appearance, but the young tearaway wasn't exactly descriptive

    外見がだらしないだけでなく、涙もろくなっていた。

  • when talking about what he'd been doing the past few weeks.

    この数週間、自分が何をしていたかを話しているとき。

  • With some grilling, Joe confessed to the crime, although the tactic of intense policepersuasion

    尋問の結果、ジョーは犯行を認めたが、警察の激しい "説得 "という戦術は

  • was embraced.

    が受け入れられました。

  • On August 27, 1936, people picked up the Reading Eagle newspaper, and on the first page in

    1936年8月27日、人々はリーディング・イーグル紙を手に取り、その最初のページには

  • bold capital letters they saw the headline, “YOUTH CONFESSES ATTACKING GIRLS.”

    大文字で書かれた "YOUTH CONFESSES ATTACKING GIRLS "という見出しが目に飛び込んできた。

  • The second paragraph of the story read: Joe Arridy, 21, arrested here last night as

    記事の第2段落にはこう書かれていた。ジョー・アリディ(21歳)は、昨夜、ここで逮捕されたのは

  • a vagrant, confessed, Sheriff George Carroll said, to the murder.

    ジョージ・キャロル保安官によると、浮浪者だった彼は殺人を告白したという。

  • He said also, according to the sheriff, that he killed Barbara Drain, 12.

    また、保安官によると、バーバラ・ドレインさん(12歳)を殺したとも言っています。

  • The younger, however, was not killed, but is still unconscious in a Pueblo hospital,

    しかし、若い方は死なずに済んだが、今もプエブロの病院で意識を失っている。

  • her skull crushed.”

    頭蓋骨が潰れていた」。

  • The report went on to say that Joe had confessed to planning the murder, waiting for the parents

    その上で、ジョーは、両親を待っている間に殺人を計画していたことを告白したと伝えている。

  • to leave the house and then going inside and hacking the girls with his ax.

    と言って家を出た後、家の中に入って斧で娘たちを切りつけた。

  • This came as quite a shock to a man named Arthur Grady.

    これは、アーサー・グラディという男にとって、とても衝撃的なことだった。

  • He was the Pueblo police chief and he already had a guy in a jail cell for the brutal slaying.

    彼はプエブロの警察署長で、すでに残虐な殺人事件の犯人を留置場に入れていた。

  • That guy was Frank Aguilar, an employee of Mr. Drain.

    その男は、ドレイン氏の部下であるフランク・アギラールだった。

  • When cops searched Aguilar's home, guess what they found?

    警察がアギラールの家を捜索したところ、何を見つけたと思いますか?

  • An ax that looked like it could have been the weapon used in the crime.

    犯行に使われたと思われる凶器のような斧。

  • Now we will look at another newspaper headline, this time in the Greely Daily Tribune.

    今度は、Greely Daily Tribuneに掲載された新聞の見出しを見てみましょう。

  • The headline read: “Aguilar says he murdered Drain child.”

    見出しはこうだ。"アギラール、ドレインの子供を殺害したと語る"

  • The article explained that Aguilar confessed to the crime by marking an X next to two five-page

    この記事では、アギラールが5ページにわたる2つのページの横にX印をつけて犯行を告白したと説明されています。

  • confessions.

    の告白。

  • The other confession was also marked with an X, but an X written by Joe Arridy.

    もう1つの自白書にも「X」が書かれていたが、「X」はジョー・アリディが書いたものだった。

  • The story goes on to say that Arridy had escaped from a home for the mentally defective and

    その話によると、アリディは精神障害者のための施設から脱走して

  • that later the two men had met the night of the murders and plotted to do the awful deed.

    後になって、二人の男は殺人の夜に会って、恐ろしい行為を計画していたことがわかった。

  • Another part of the story read, “The confessions were made under the questioning of warden

    また、「自白は所長の尋問を受けて行われた」という記事もありました。

  • Roy Best.”

    ロイ・ベスト"

  • Don't forget that name.

    その名前を忘れないでください。

  • The article failed to mention a few very important things, matters you could say were of mortal

    この記事では、いくつかの非常に重要な事柄について触れられていませんでした。

  • importance.

    を重要視しています。

  • At first, Aguilar had said he had never seen Joe Arridy before in his life, only after

    最初、アギラールはジョー・アリディを見たことがないと言っていたが、後になって

  • some of that infamous persuasive police questioning he changed that statement to being with Joe

    説得力のある警察の質問に答えて、ジョーと一緒にいたという供述に変えた。

  • when the girls were killed.

    彼女たちが殺されたとき

  • Another giant omission was the fact that Joe hadn't said a word in the transcript of

    もう一つの大きな欠落は、ジョーが一言も発言していないという事実である。

  • the confession.

    と告白しています。

  • All the talk came from Aguilar.

    全ての話はアギラールからでした。

  • In 1937, Aguilar was convicted of the crime and was subsequently executed, but at least

    1937年、アギラールは有罪判決を受け、その後処刑されましたが、少なくとも

  • some people knew something wasn't quite right with Joe's signing of the confession.

    ジョーが告白書にサインしたことで、何かがおかしいと感じた人もいるでしょう。

  • Even so, his lawyer tried to argue that he wasn't guilty by reason of insanity, rather

    それでも、彼の弁護士は、心神喪失を理由にした有罪ではなく、むしろ

  • than fight the case for his absolute innocence.

    自分の絶対的な無罪を主張して戦うよりも

  • Think about it.

    考えてみてください。

  • There wasn't an actual transcript of Joe's confession, which is a big deal.

    ジョーの告白の実際の記録がなかったのは、大きな問題です。

  • Also, there was no evidence that put Joe close to the Drain house on the night of the crime.

    また、犯行の夜、ジョーがドレインの家の近くにいたことを示す証拠はありませんでした。

  • It also came to light that Joe had said he killed the girl with a club, not an ax, as

    また、ジョーは少女を斧ではなく棍棒で殺したと言っていたことも明らかになった。

  • if he'd been led on when he first talked to Sheriff Carroll.

    キャロル保安官と最初に話をした時に誘導されたのであれば

  • Still, the lawyer went for the insanity defense.

    それでも、弁護士は心神喪失の弁護を行った。

  • It didn't work, which is not surprising because it very rarely does, then and now.

    うまくいかなかったのは当然で、当時も今も、うまくいくことはほとんどない。

  • But when three state psychiatrists testified in the case something else came up.

    しかし、3人の州の精神科医が証言すると、別の問題が出てきた。

  • That was the fact they all said that Joe had the mental age of a six-year-old.

    それは、彼らが口をそろえて「ジョーは精神年齢が6歳児だ」と言ったことだ。

  • His IQ was 46, which back then made him animbecile.”

    彼のIQは46で、当時は「能無し」と呼ばれていた。

  • Such a word was just formal medical lexicon in those days, just asretardwas.

    このような言葉は、「知恵遅れ」と同じように、当時の医学界の正式な辞書に過ぎませんでした。

  • Joe wasn't quite anidiotin the now obsolete classifications, but he also didn't

    ジョーは、今となっては時代遅れの分類である「バカ」とまではいかなかったが、それにしても

  • qualify as a “moron.”

    は "MORON "と呼ばれています。

  • Still, the psychiatrists said he wasincapable of distinguishing between right and wrong,

    しかし、精神科医は彼を「善悪の区別がつかない」と言っていた。

  • and therefore, would be unable to perform any action with a criminal intent.”

    であり、したがって、犯罪の意図を持った行為を行うことができないであろう。"

  • But what about his spoken confession to Sheriff Carroll?

    しかし、キャロル保安官に話した告白はどうでしょうか?

  • Was it right that a man with the brain capacity of a little kid should be convicted of murder

    幼い子供のような頭脳の持ち主が殺人罪で有罪になるのは正しいことなのか

  • for something he said under police duress?

    警察の強要のもとで発言したことで?

  • Of course it wasn't, but the police could get away with more venality back then than

    もちろんそうではないが、当時の警察はより悪質なことをやってのけた。

  • they currently get away with.

    現在のところ、彼らは逃げています。

  • When Barbara Drain recovered from her injuries she wasn't suffering from amnesia and so

    バーバラ・ドレインが怪我から回復したとき、彼女は記憶喪失ではなかったので

  • could talk about what happened on the night.

    は、その日の夜に起こったことを話してくれました。

  • Things looked good for Joe because she said the guy in her bedroom was the man that worked

    寝室にいるのは、仕事をしている男だと言っていたので、ジョーにとっては良い状況だった。

  • for her father, Frank Aguilar.

    父であるフランク・アグイラのために。

  • She also said she didn't recall Joe being there on the night of the attack.

    また、テロの夜にジョーがいたことを覚えていないとも言っていました。

  • It didn't seem to matter.

    そんなことはどうでもいいと思っていた。

  • Joe was convicted of murder and sentenced to die in the gas chamber.

    ジョーは殺人罪で有罪となり、ガス室での死を宣告された。

  • He wasn't alone, however, and there were numerous appeals.

    しかし、彼だけではなく、多くの人がアピールしていました。

  • Attorney Gail L. Ireland got behind him and said the evidence stated that Aguilar had

    ゲイル・L・アイルランド弁護士は彼の後ろにつき、証拠はアギラーが

  • first said he committed the crime alone.

    は一人で犯行に及んだという。

  • Furthermore, said Ireland, this other guy you've got locked is so mentally challenged

    さらに、アイルランドでは、あなたがロックしたもう一人の男は、精神的な障害を持っています。

  • that he doesn't even know what execution means.

    彼は実行の意味も知らないということです。

  • Believe me when I say that if he is gassed, it will take a long time for the state of

    「もし、彼がガス化されたとしたら、その状態では長い時間がかかるだろうということを私は信じています。

  • Colorado to live down the disgrace,” said Ireland in court.

    コロラド州では、このような不名誉なことがあってはならない」と法廷で述べた。

  • The appeals seemed to work for a while, as did all the other petitions flooding in.

    この訴えは、しばらくの間は効果があったようで、他の嘆願書も殺到しました。

  • Just as the execution was around the corner, a stay was granted.

    死刑執行が目前に迫った頃、執行猶予がついた。

  • In fact, nine stays were granted in all, but those are just temporary delays.

    実際、全部で9回のステイが認められましたが、それはあくまでも一時的な遅延です。

  • What Ireland and all of Joe's supporters wanted was an exoneration, and that was looking

    アイルランドやジョーの支持者が望んでいたのは、無罪放免であり、それを求めていたのです。

  • possible the more support that Joe received.

    そのためには、ジョーのサポートが必要だった。

  • Meanwhile, Joe was in his cell on death row playing with his toy trucks and sending his

    一方、ジョーは死刑囚監房で、おもちゃのトラックで遊んでいて、彼にメールを送っていた。

  • wind-up train past the cells of all the other prisoners' cells.

    巻き上げ式の列車が、他のすべての囚人の独房を通り過ぎていく。

  • He actually seemed to be enjoying himself, probably because for the first time in a while

    楽しそうにしていたのは、久しぶりだったからでしょうか。

  • he had a place to sleep and was getting warm meals on a regular basis.

    彼には寝る場所があり、定期的に温かい食事が用意されていました。

  • Warden Roy Best, who was there when Aguila and Joe wrote those “X's” was the one

    アギラとジョーが「X」を書いた時に居合わせた所長のロイ・ベストが

  • that gave Joe the toys.

    ジョーにおもちゃをくれた人。

  • Why hadn't he said anything about Joe's mental state before if he felt so sorry for

    そんなに気の毒に思うなら、なぜ今までジョーの精神状態について何も言わなかったのだろうか。

  • him, you might be wondering.

    と疑問に思うかもしれません。

  • That's not an easy question to answer.

    それは簡単に答えられる質問ではありません。

  • Best became known as themost notoriouswarden in Colorado history.

    ベストは、コロラド州の歴史上、「最も悪名高い」所長として知られるようになった。

  • He flogged prisoners, and he tortured them with other terrible punishments, and when

    囚人を鞭で打ったり、他のひどい罰を与えて拷問したりしていましたが、ある時

  • he thought someone was homosexual, he made them wear a dress and push a wheelbarrow full

    誰かが同性愛者だと思って、ドレスを着せて、一輪車をいっぱいに押させた。

  • of bricks around all day.

    のレンガを一日中動かしていました。

  • Nevertheless, he had a progressive side, too.

    とはいえ、彼には進歩的な面もあった。

  • He developed educational programs so that prisoners might get a job once released.

    囚人が出所後に仕事を得られるよう、教育プログラムを開発した。

  • He ensured women prisoners were kept safe from dangerous male prisoners and he even

    彼は、女性の囚人が危険な男性の囚人から安全に守られるようにし、さらには

  • introduced a dental care program in the prison.

    は、刑務所内に歯科治療プログラムを導入しました。

  • It seems he also stood by prisoners who were mentally disabled.

    また、知的障害のある囚人にも寄り添っていたようです。

  • Still, Joe didn't need more toys or caring words from the warden, what he needed was

    しかし、ジョーが必要としていたのは、おもちゃや所長の気遣いの言葉ではない。

  • the state to do something unusual and admit mistakes had happened.

    このような状況下で、国は異例のことをして、過ちを認めたのです。

  • This never comes easy.

    これは決して簡単なことではありません。

  • Like many people who criticize the justice system say, it's often winning that counts,

    司法制度を批判する多くの人々が言うように、勝つことが重要であることが多い。

  • not justice.

    not justice.

  • And as time passed, even with all the petitions, and support from Best himself, the state was

    そして時間が経つにつれ、すべての嘆願書やベスト自身のサポートがあっても、国は

  • starting to look like a winner.

    勝利の可能性が見えてきました。

  • January 5, 1939.

    1939年1月5日。

  • The Reading Eagle published another article about Joe.

    リーディング・イーグル紙にもジョーに関する記事が掲載された。

  • The headline read: “Condemned prisoner to give train to another slayer.”

    見出しはこうだ。"死刑囚が別の殺し屋に列車を渡す"

  • The story called Joeweak-witted”, and said he had the intelligence of a six-year-old,

    その記事では、ジョーを「頭の弱い人」と呼び、6歳児のような知能を持っていると言っていた。

  • but it didn't question that injustice might have occurred, and instead called him a “slayer”.

    が、不正があったかもしれないことを問わず、「スレイヤー」と呼んだ。

  • The article said that when the Warden went to Joe's cell to tell him that his death

    その記事によると、所長がジョーの独房に行って、彼の死を伝えたときは

  • was impending, the only thing Joe said was give my train to the guy in the other cell.

    その時、ジョーが言ったのは、私の列車を他の房の男に渡してくれというだけだった。

  • The newspaper described this other guy, Angelo Agnes, as a “Denver negro condemned for

    新聞には、もう一人の男、アンジェロ・アグネスが、「デンバーの黒人が非難されている」と書かれていた。

  • slaying his wife.”

    自分の妻を殺した」。

  • Best told the paper that Joe had told him, “If I go, yes, I give my train to Agnes.”

    ベストは同紙に対し、ジョーが "もし俺が行くなら、そうだな、俺の列車はアグネスに渡すよ "と言っていたと語った。

  • He actually didn't really know what the gas chamber was, although he did have some

    彼は、ガス室がどういうものかよく知らなかったのだが、多少は知っていたようだ。

  • understanding of dying.

    死ぬことへの理解

  • He had said to Best, “No, no.

    彼はBestに「No,No」と言っていた。

  • Joe won't die.”

    ジョーは死なない」。

  • January 6, 1939.

    1939年1月6日のことです。

  • Prison chaplain Father Albert Schaller walked into Joe's cell.

    刑務所のチャプレンであるアルバート・シャラー神父がジョーの独房に入ってきた。

  • As soon as he looked at Joe again he knew a travesty of justice was about to happen.

    彼が再びジョーを見た瞬間、正義の茶番劇が起きようとしていることがわかった。

  • The chaplain watched Joe eat the ice cream, the food he'd asked for when asked what

    チャプレンは、ジョーがアイスクリームを食べるのを見ていた。

  • he wanted for his last meal.

    彼は最後の食事に望んだ。

  • He couldn't actually comprehend what that meant, of course.

    もちろん、その意味を理解することはできなかった。

  • When the chaplain read Joe his last rites, he had to do it very slowly and only two words

    チャプレンがジョーの最後の儀式を読むときは、非常にゆっくりと、2つの言葉だけで行わなければなりませんでした。

  • at a time so Joe could repeat the words.

    一度にたくさんの言葉が出てくるので、ジョーはその言葉を繰り返すことができました。

  • The chaplain tried to hold back his emotions, but his eyes filled with tears.

    チャプレンは感情を抑えようとしたが、目には涙が溜まっていた。

  • When the chaplain explained to Joe what was about to happen, Joe just looked at him with

    チャプレンがジョーにこれから起こることを説明したとき、ジョーはただ彼を見ていた。

  • blank bewilderment.”

    "blank bewilderment"

  • When led out of his cell the last thing he did was hand over the train as he'd promised.

    牢屋から出された彼が最後にしたことは、約束通り列車を渡すことだった。

  • He started to get nervous when being walked towards the execution room with about 50 other

    約50人の仲間と一緒に死刑執行室に向かって歩いているときから、彼は緊張し始めた。

  • people.

    の人がいます。

  • He might not have known what the gas chamber was, but he could sense something unusual

    彼はガス室が何であるかは知らなかったかもしれないが、何か異常なものを感じ取っていた。

  • was happening now.

    が今起きていた。

  • He started to shake on the way, only to be calmed down when warden Best held his hand.

    途中で震え出したが、ベスト所長が手を握ってくれたことで落ち着くことができた。

  • Do you understand, Joe?” asked Best.

    "Do you understand, Joe? "とベストが尋ねた。

  • They are killing me,” Joe replied, still looking like a confused child.

    「と、ジョーは相変わらず子供のような顔で答えた。

  • When he entered the room, he was strapped into the chair.

    部屋に入ると、彼は椅子に縛り付けられていた。

  • At that point, he was grinning nervously.

    その時、彼は緊張してニヤニヤしていた。

  • When a blindfold was put over his eyes, for the first time in a long time, he wasn't

    目隠しをされたとき、久しぶりに自分の目が

  • smiling at all.

    笑顔が絶えない。

  • He was petrified.

    彼は石化していた。

  • The warden and the chaplain said goodbye.

    所長とチャプレンは別れを惜しんだ。

  • Joe mutteredbye”, trembling as he did so.

    ジョーは震えながら「バイバイ」とつぶやいた。

  • Then all he heard was the clanging of the steel door closing.

    そして、鉄製のドアが閉まる音だけが聞こえてきた。

  • The airtight chamber filled with cyanide as Joe waited, wondering what they were doing

    密閉された部屋には青酸カリが充満しており、ジョーは何をしているのかと思いながら待っていた。

  • to him.

    と言っていました。

  • January 7, 1939.

    1939年1月7日のことです。

  • A headline in the St. Petersburg Times read, “Happiest man in death cell dies.”

    セント・ピーターズバーグ・タイムズ紙の見出しには、「死刑囚の中で最も幸せな男が死んだ」と書かれていた。

  • The story went on, “The 23-year old youth, described as having a mental age of six, was

    物語はさらに、「精神年齢が6歳と言われている23歳の若者が

  • pronounced dead six and one-fourth minutes after cyanide pellets were dropped into an

    に青酸カリのペレットを投下してから6分1秒後に死亡が確認されました。

  • acid jar beneath the chair to which he was strapped.”

    彼を縛り付けていた椅子の下にあった酸の瓶」。

  • The warden said after, “He probably didn't even know he was about to die.”

    所長はその後、"彼は自分が死のうとしていることさえ知らなかったのだろう "と言った。

  • It should have been big news.

    大きなニュースになるはずだった。

  • It should have upset a nation, but then newspaper headlines in bigger print than Joe's had

    このようにして、日本中を驚かせることができたのですが、その後、ジョーが書いたよりも大きな文字で新聞の見出しが出ました。

  • the names Hitler and Mussolini in them.

    ヒトラーやムッソリーニの名前が入っています。

  • People had other concerns.

    他にも心配事がありました。

  • In the decades to come, though, people still talked about this massive injustice, a crime

    しかし、何十年経っても、人々はこの巨大な不正、つまり犯罪について語り続けていた。

  • committed by those supposed to protect us.

    私たちを守るべき人たちが犯した罪。

  • Finally, in 2011, Colorado Governor Bill Ritter issued a pardon for Joe, saying there had

    そして2011年、コロラド州のビル・リッター知事は、ジョーに恩赦を与えたのです。

  • been, a “tragic conviction based on a false and coerced confessionof a mentally disabled

    は、精神障害者の「虚偽の強要された自白に基づく悲劇的な有罪判決」である。

  • man.

    の人です。

  • He added, “Pardoning Arridy cannot undo this tragic event in Colorado history.

    また、「アリディを赦免しても、コロラド州の歴史に残るこの悲劇的な出来事を元に戻すことはできません。

  • It is in the interests of justice and simple decency, however, to restore his good name.”

    しかし、彼の名誉を回復することは、正義と単純な良識のためである」。

  • Now you need to watch, “Innocent on Death Row, Here's What You Actually Get When You're

    今見てほしいのは、「無実の死刑囚、実はこんな目に遭っていた」です。

  • Released.”

    リリースされました。"

  • Or, have a look at, “Why Prisoner Proven Innocent Can't Be Released.”

    また、「無実が証明された囚人が釈放されない理由」を見てみましょう。

A 23-year old man sits in a prison cell with the widest smile painted across his face.

23歳の男が、満面の笑みを浮かべて刑務所の独房に座っている。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 ジョー 告白 囚人 コロラド 列車 死刑

最も幸せな死刑囚とは (The Happiest Death Row Prisoner)

  • 4 0
    Summer に公開 2021 年 08 月 26 日
動画の中の単語