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  • (dynamic intro music)

  • - The world is changing.

  • Inspiration is everywhere.

  • It has never been so easy to connect, share,

  • and bring people together.

  • We're learning from others

  • and finding the best in ourselves.

  • (upbeat dynamic music)

  • Challenging our beliefs, sharing our vulnerability,

  • overcoming our fears,

  • transforming ourselves so we can transform the world.

  • How far can we go.

  • This is "London Real," I am Brian Rose.

  • My guest today is..

  • (dramatic music)

  • - Shall we do this gentlemen?

  • - Go for it.

  • Got his timer right here, man.

  • - Let's do this Max.

  • Let's do this Alessio. - Do it.

  • - This is "London Real."

  • I am Brian Rose, with me today is Alessio Rastani,

  • the Robin Hood of Wall Street, some say.

  • He's known to the world first on BBC live television

  • for telling us that Goldman Sachs rules the world.

  • Max, did you see that?

  • - Seminal moment in television history?

  • Alessio! Br, br, tell the world the truth

  • about Goldman Sachs.

  • The BBC was shocked. - It was awesome.

  • - They were shocked, they looked around like "What?

  • "What's going on?

  • "Who let this guy in?

  • "Oh my God! (Alessio laughing)

  • "Somebody called my lawyer, my accountant, it's all wrong."

  • "It's all good."

  • "It's all bad."

  • - I love that one.

  • You would have seen Alessio first,

  • we had him on the show,

  • it was an episode I called, "Money Never Sleeps."

  • You guys get the reference to Wall Street?

  • Yeah. That's before- - Yeah. Really clever.

  • - That's before the second movie came out.

  • - Yeah. Really. - Thank you very much.

  • - Michael Douglas. - Awesome.

  • - Was really good. - I know this is gonna be

  • a tough audience, and-

  • - It's a good episode on this show, "The Alessio Show."

  • - Oh, thank you. - He goes into the truth.

  • - Thank you. - The truth.

  • - Truth timeout.

  • - And with us today is Mr. Max Keiser.

  • Could you be of any doubt?

  • He is an American broadcaster and filmmaker.

  • He hosts "Keiser Report." - Oh so we started?

  • - Yeah. Yeah, we started.

  • (Alessio laughs)

  • - All right. Great.

  • - You host "Keiser Report,"

  • which is a financial programme broadcast on RT,

  • formerly known as Russia Today.

  • - Yeah.

  • - And three times a week, I think-

  • - Yeah, three.

  • You've done your notes well, thank you.

  • You've done your homework. - Thank you.

  • - Three times a week, that's right.

  • - You've you've presented for the BBC,

  • Al Jazeera, you write for the "Huffington Post,"

  • blah, blah, blah.

  • Welcome, thank you so much for coming.

  • - It's great to be here.

  • - It's a pleasure having you Max.

  • - Yeah, it's fantastic.

  • - You know, I say we get straight to it gentleman.

  • Let's toss it all out the window

  • because why we're here is to talk about,

  • what is a Bitcoin and why do we care Max?

  • - I thought we were gonna start off

  • talking about Martha Stewart.

  • (Alessio laughing)

  • Because Alessio has his copy of "Success Magazine."

  • - Hold that up. - That he brought along

  • with the Martha Stewart. - Hold that up right there.

  • - It's a good magazine you should read it.

  • - Yeah, they've changed their remit a little bit,

  • it's now it's about success getting out of jail.

  • That this is how they get out of jail.

  • - If for any reason I thought my show wouldn't get hijacked.

  • What was I thinking?

  • Continue, continue.

  • Who's the former CEO of Enron, it's Skilling, Jeff Skilling.

  • He's success because they're let him out of jail early,

  • 10 years early, he's success.

  • - It's a good lawyer.

  • - "Cause he's got out of jail.

  • So I also, you know,

  • all the jails privatised now,

  • they're owned by private corporations.

  • So the great thing for that,

  • if you're in one of these private jails

  • you can get out by doing a leveraged buyout of the jail.

  • You could borrow a billion or 5 billion or 10 billion,

  • you buy the jail-

  • - And let yourself out.

  • - And you walk out a free man

  • 'cause you see that's the the economy

  • that we're in right now.

  • It's all good.

  • It's all possible.

  • - I love that.

  • - There's no limit to the amount of credit you can borrow

  • at almost 0% interest if you're on the inside

  • or on the right side of the interest rate apartheid wall,

  • as I call it.

  • - It all right, I like that.

  • And I wanna talk more about that,

  • and I wanna talk about gold and silver.

  • But right now we've got to talk Bitcoin.

  • Max, everyone says you're the expert.

  • I go on Twitter,

  • everyone's like "Max, Max, Max, Max."

  • I know no one's the expert on this thing.

  • - In this town, I'm one of few people

  • that has immersed myself into Bitcoin.

  • - Why did you choose Bitcoin,

  • 'cause you do a lot of other things too?

  • - Yeah. Well, I guess it goes back to the early '90s,

  • you know, when the internet first came around

  • and I was very intrigued by that.

  • I was living in Paris at the time,

  • and I picked up a copy of "WIRED" magazine

  • and I just immersed myself in to the internet.

  • And this was just before or at about the time that Netscape

  • was going public, 1994.

  • And this was right when,

  • the internet had been around for a while,

  • but it was gonna go through this explosive growth period.

  • So I was living in Paris and I went to Los Angeles

  • and I just threw myself into the internet.

  • And people in Los Angeles were very frightened

  • of the internet, they didn't want anything to do

  • with the internet.

  • Nobody had email addresses.

  • They laughed, they said it's a fad,

  • it's gonna go away.

  • And then we had "The Blair Witch Project" came along,

  • which was really made, you know,

  • Hollywood take notice because it was made

  • for like 60,000 bucks or a 100,000 bucks

  • and it did $200 million globally.

  • And it was entirely internet driven.

  • It was like six months before it opened

  • it had this grassroots internet-based campaign.

  • And so now suddenly Hollywood got interested,

  • but then they had the problem of intellectual property

  • and copyrights and all that kind of going up against

  • their core business model of controlling the copyright

  • at all costs.

  • But, anyway, they took on the internet.

  • The internet, of course, exploded in popularity as such

  • and I created some technology around that,

  • the virtual specialist technology

  • for trading virtual currencies.

  • And I invented the virtual currency, virtual trading,

  • virtual securities and a virtual trading platform.

  • And it has a patent on this, it's U.S. patented,

  • there's actually now four patents relating to this.

  • - Was this the Hollywood Exchange.

  • - The Hollywood Stock Exchange.

  • - Does it still exist?

  • - Yeah, eventually it was sold to Cantor Fitzgerald,

  • and then they moved the whole thing to the top floor

  • of the World Trade Centre at about six months

  • before 9/11. - Wow.

  • - So it had a happy ending, I guess.

  • - You know that guy had cancer,

  • he retrieved like a statue he had on his desk

  • from the a 110th floor.

  • It's like some piece of metal and they brought it to him

  • out of the rubble, like a year later,

  • and they were like "Here."

  • - Well, I'm writing, see this is a segues into my Bitcoin

  • a little bit, because I have a film project,

  • and one of my other projects,

  • internet project called "Pirate My Film."

  • It's a story about a Morgan Stanley broker

  • who when the first tower was hit on 9/11,

  • he had a choice whether to stay and trade options

  • on airlines and make a lot of money on insider trading

  • or to run for his life. - That's right.

  • - Is this is a real story?

  • - Well, I'm piecing together all these bits and pieces.

  • - I like it already.

  • - And so it looks like he chose to trade options,

  • and then the second tower got hit and he's dead

  • and those options were never collected.

  • It's in an account, Alex Brown,

  • the $5 million of the profits.

  • I used to work at Alex Brown.

  • And so I know, for example, Buzzy Krongard,

  • I met a couple of times.

  • He was working for the CIA,

  • he had been working for Alex Brown.

  • - This is before Bankers Trust bought them?

  • - Deutsche Bank.

  • - Banks Trust

  • then Deutsche Bank. - Bought Alex Brown.

  • - Okay (indistinct)

  • - There was a lot of a chatter going on

  • between the CIA and Alex Brown leading up to

  • the 9/11 attacks.

  • So those options were skyrocketing in value,

  • and the volume was exploding.

  • So there's a lot of chatter, whether, you know,

  • there's a lot of information being passed around

  • and people were trading on that information.

  • - So he was shorting the airlines.

  • - He's buying the puts, essentially, the same thing-

  • - Yeah, same thing. - Shorting the stock

  • or buying puts.

  • So he was speculating on, so-

  • - It wasn't a (indistinct) play, just puts.

  • - If you look at, like, for example,

  • I was working on Wall Street during the shuttle disaster

  • when it blew up, and right after the shuttle blew up,

  • this was in maybe '86 or '85-

  • - Yeah '86.

  • - And Morton Thiokol was the lead contractor

  • on the solid rocket boosters. - O-rings, the o-ring, yeah.

  • - And the puts on that thing, you know,

  • obviously you made a killing

  • if you got in there quick enough.

  • So while Christa McAuliffe is, you know,

  • fish food all over the ocean, you know,

  • we were in the brokerage firm, like, you know,

  • buying these options, you know, making lots of money,

  • But the options exploded in value on the upside,

  • the puts, in a way before the 9/11.

  • So you saw the same thing, like something blew up,

  • but before anything happened, that's how they were trading.

  • So it says on the official 9/11 report

  • that they looked into the trading,

  • but it was an official, reputable firm,

  • Alex Brown, so we trust them

  • and we're not gonna investigate any further.

  • But even though, obviously, there was a lot of information

  • being passed around.

  • So I put together the story about this guy,

  • and, you know, it's a classic American story;

  • your life, you know, run with your life

  • or make a few million bucks, you know.

  • And then everyone has to make that decision every day now,

  • especially on the frontline of capitalism as such.

  • So he chose, you know, go for the money and, you know,

  • he didn't make it out.

  • - Reasonable decision.

  • - (chuckles) So he's gone.