Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • There is a facility in Maryland, mostly used for housing military members and civilian

    メリーランド州には、主に軍人や民間人を収容するための施設があります。

  • workers.

    の労働者がいます。

  • But in the past, it was a testing ground - as people were exposed to some of the deadliest

    しかし、かつては実験場であり、人々は致命的なものにさらされていました。

  • substances around.

    周りの物質。

  • And the test subjects?

    被験者は?

  • American soldiers.

    アメリカ人兵士。

  • It was the late 1940s, and the United States and its allies were still sorting through

    時は1940年代後半、アメリカとその同盟国は、まだ

  • the rubble after their victory in the Second World War.

    第二次世界大戦で勝利を収めた後、瓦礫の中にあった。

  • The two World Wars had introduced a terrifying new element to warfare - chemical weapons

    二つの世界大戦では、化学兵器という恐ろしい新要素が戦争に持ち込まれた。

  • that could incapacitate, disable, or even kill soldiers simply by releasing a spray

    兵士を無力化したり、無力化したり、あるいは殺すことができるスプレーです。

  • or gas into the battlefield.

    やガスを戦場に持ち込むことができます。

  • While the use of these weapons had decreased in the Second World War due to treaties, the

    第二次世界大戦では条約により使用が減少していたが、今回の

  • Nazis had continued developing the deadly tools of war.

    ナチスは、戦争のための致命的な道具を開発し続けていた。

  • And the United States wanted to understand them - and how to stop them.

    そしてアメリカは、彼らを理解し、どうすれば止められるかを知りたがっていた。

  • The government obtained the formulas for a trio of nerve gases developed by the Nazis

    ナチスが開発した3種類の神経ガスの製法を政府が入手した。

  • - deadly chemical agents that could interrupt the flow of signals between the brain and

    - 致命的な化学物質は、脳との間の信号の流れを妨害する可能性があります。

  • the body.

    体になっています。

  • These could have long-term debilitating effects and were more dangerous than many other chemical

    これらは長期的な衰弱をもたらす可能性があり、他の多くの化学物質よりも危険でした。

  • weapons, which were primarily irritants or caused respiratory distress.

    の武器は、主に刺激物であったり、呼吸困難を引き起こすものでした。

  • The gases, named tabun, soman, and the soon-to-be-notorious sarin, all had the potential to be fatal.

    タブン、ソマン、サリンと名づけられたこれらのガスは、いずれも致死性のものであった。

  • At the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center at the Aberdeen Proving Ground, the government

    アバディーン試験場のエッジウッド化学生物学センターでは、政府が

  • started doing tests on the gases and how to prevent and treat their effects.

    このような状況の中で、私たちは、ガスがどのような影響を及ぼすのか、どのようにして防ぐのか、どのようにして治療するのかについてのテストを始めた。

  • But there would soon be a shocking twist to these early tests.

    しかし、この初期のテストには、すぐに衝撃的な展開が待っていた。

  • It was only 1948 when the government first started involving human test subjects in their

    政府が実験に被験者を参加させるようになったのは、1948年のことである。

  • experiments.

    の実験を行いました。

  • While it doesn't seem any test subjects were exposed deliberately to these deadly

    意図的に死の灰を浴びせられた被験者はいないと思われるが

  • gases, technicians were exposed to trace amounts - and the government learned a lot from these

    技術者が微量のガスを浴びることで、政府は多くのことを学びました。

  • accidents.

    の事故が発生します。

  • While the amounts the employees were exposed to wasn't enough to be fatal, it was more

    従業員が浴びた量は致命的なものではありませんでしたが、それ以上のものでした。

  • than enough to cause psychological distress - and that gave the government a potentially

    心理的な苦痛を与えるには十分すぎるほどであり、政府には潜在的な

  • risky idea.

    リスキーなアイデア。

  • What if the weapons could be refined into something less deadly - but still powerful?

    もしも、その武器を改良して、より殺傷力の低い、しかし強力な武器にすることができたら?

  • Luther Wilson Greene, the technical director of a specialized division at Edgewood, published

    エッジウッドの専門部門の技術責任者であるルーサー・ウィルソン・グリーン氏が出版した

  • a classified report in 1949 about the possibility of psychochemical weapons.

    1949年に、精神化学兵器の可能性についての機密報告書を作成した。

  • Based partially on the experiments that showed the psychoactive effects of the nerve gases

    神経ガスの精神作用を示す実験の一部に基づいて

  • in small doses, Greene argued that this weapon could change war forever.

    グリーンは、この兵器が戦争を永遠に変えることができると主張しました。

  • What if instead of creating deadlier weapons that would leave carnage in their wake, the

    もしも、より殺伐とした兵器を作る代わりに

  • US developed chemical weapons that could cause mental incapacitation and end battles without

    米国が開発した化学兵器は、精神的に無力化し、戦闘を無傷で終わらせることができる。

  • a shot being fired?

    撃たれたのか?

  • It wouldn't be long before the experiments took on new importance.

    この実験が新たな意味を持つようになるのは、そう遠いことではないだろう。

  • Harvard anesthesiologist Henry K. Beecher was soon recruited to work on experiments

    ハーバード大学の麻酔科医であるヘンリー・K・ビーチャーは、すぐに実験のために採用された。

  • at Camp King in Germany - working with many illegal drugs that could earn someone a hefty

    ドイツのキャンプ・キングでは、高額な報酬が得られるような多くの違法薬物を扱っていました。

  • prison sentence for civilian use.

    民生用の刑務所の判決

  • Could LSD and mescaline have military implications?

    LSDやメスカリンは軍事的な意味合いがあるのでしょうか?

  • The government also interviewed former Nazi physicians to learn everything they could

    また、政府はナチスの元医師にインタビューを行い、できる限りの情報を得ました。

  • about these tools, and many in the military brass thought that these weapons could actually

    このようなツールについて、軍上層部の多くは「この兵器は実際に使える」と考えていました。

  • be more humane than bombs and other traditional weapons.

    は、爆弾やその他の伝統的な武器よりも、より人道的である。

  • But to find out, the government needed test subjects.

    しかし、それを知るためには被験者が必要だった。

  • It was 1948 when the government first authorized what would be known as the Edgewood Arsenal

    エドウッドアーセナルと呼ばれる施設を政府が認可したのは1948年のことだった。

  • human experiments - a series of tests of chemical substances on human volunteers at their Aberdeen

    人体実験 - 人間のボランティアに対して、化学物質をアバディーンで試す一連の実験。

  • facilities.

    の施設があります。

  • In total, they would experiment on around eight thousand people over close to three

    3年近くにわたり、合計で約8,000人の人々を対象に実験を行いました。

  • decades, and test over two hundred and fifty chemicals.

    何十年にもわたって、250種類以上の化学物質をテストしています。

  • Most would be midspectrum incapacitants, or drugs that cause a mental effect without much

    ほとんどの場合、ミッドスペクトラム・インキャパシタント、つまり、大したことがなくても精神的な効果をもたらす薬です。

  • in the way of long-term physical consequences.

    長期的な身体的影響を考慮すると

  • For airborne gases, the government would use a wind tunnel to deliver the compound in a

    空気中のガスについては、政府が風洞を使って化合物を届けて

  • way similar to how it would be blown by the wind on the battlefield.

    戦場で風に吹かれているのと同じような感覚です。

  • Now, the government just needed to get volunteers.

    あとは、政府がボランティアを集めるだけだ。

  • While the use of human subjects in experiments on potential chemical weapons was controversial,

    化学兵器の実験に人間を使うことには賛否両論がありました。

  • the government tried to stay above board with how they conducted it.

    政府は、そのやり方については問題がないように努めていた。

  • No enlisted men were ordered by their commanding officers to be part of these experiments.

    この実験に参加するように指揮官から命じられた下士官はいなかった。

  • Instead, the government conducted a series of recruitments at Army installations.

    その代わり、政府は陸軍施設での募集を次々と行った。

  • The soldiers would be shown a short film and given some handouts to explain the experiment,

    兵士たちは、短い映画を見せられ、実験を説明するための資料を渡される。

  • and those who showed interest were given a medical and psychological screening.

    と言って、興味を示した人には医学的、心理的なスクリーニングを行いました。

  • The Army wanted men who were healthy and able to withstand the effects of the compounds,

    陸軍は、健康で化合物の影響に耐えられる男性を求めていた。

  • but they also needed to be in the right frame of mind and know their limits.

    しかし、それに加えて、自分の限界を知り、適切な心構えをする必要がありました。

  • Men who were too enthusiastic and wanted to see how much they could handle were usually

    気合いを入れすぎて、自分の力を試してみたいと思った男性は、たいてい

  • rejected, but those with an interest in science were prime recruits.

    しかし、科学に興味のある人たちは積極的に参加してくれた。

  • It was surprisingly easy to get the men they needed.

    必要な人員を確保するのは意外と簡単だった。

  • By the time the military had gone through ten Army bases, they would often be given

    軍隊が10個の陸軍基地を経る頃には、しばしば次のようなものが与えられる。

  • four to six hundred applications.

    4~600件の応募がありました。

  • They would be winnowed down to no more than one hundred, and these soldiers would be brought

    100人に絞られて、その兵士たちが運ばれてくる。

  • to Edgewood where they would serve one to two months as test subjects.

    彼らはエッジウッドで1~2ヶ月間、被験者として働くことになる。

  • There were perks for volunteering - a small allowance, free weekends, and only light duty

    ボランティア活動の特典として、小遣いがもらえたり、週末は自由に過ごせたり、軽い仕事しかできなかったりした。

  • while volunteering.

    ボランティア活動をしながら

  • But it still wasn't for the faint of heart - because these test subjects would be spending

    しかし、気の弱い人には無理でしょう。

  • some very unpleasant hours being exposed to substances that could cause chaos in large

    大規模な混乱を引き起こす可能性のある物質にさらされ、非常に不快な時間を過ごしました。

  • amounts.

    の金額になります。

  • So what substances were tested?

    では、どのような物質がテストされたのでしょうか。

  • The government was particularly interested in the effects of popular drugs and if they

    政府が特に関心を持っていたのは、人気のある薬の効果であり、もしそれが

  • could be weaponized.

    兵器化される可能性があります。

  • LSD, a psychoactive drug notorious for causing intense hallucinations and altered thoughts,

    LSDとは、強烈な幻覚や変幻自在な思考を引き起こすことで有名な精神医薬です。

  • was thought to be a potential way to send an opposing army into a panic.

    は、相手の軍隊をパニックに陥れることができると考えられていました。

  • THC, one of the key components in marijuana, had no known lethal dose and was seen as a

    マリファナの主要成分のひとつであるTHCは、致死量が知られておらず、そのために

  • possible tool for slowing down enemy soldiers and reducing their aggression levels.

    敵兵の動きを鈍らせ、攻撃力を低下させることができます。

  • The same goes for benzodiazepines, which lower brain activity and are commonly used to treat

    脳の活動を低下させるベンゾジアゼピン系薬剤も同様で、一般的に治療に用いられます。

  • anxiety and insomnia.

    不安や不眠を解消します。

  • Making an entire enemy army fall asleep would certainly be an effective tool in a war.

    敵の全軍を眠らせてしまうというのは、確かに戦争では有効な手段でしょう。

  • But there was one drug that was considered of particular interest.

    しかし、その中でも特に注目されていた薬がありました。

  • BZ, also known as 3-Quinuclidinyl benzilate, is an odorless and stable powder that can

    BZは、3-キヌクリジニルベンジレートとしても知られており、無臭で安定した粉末で、以下のことが可能です。

  • survive a lot - even being spread by hot munitions.

    炎上した弾によって拡散されても、多くのことを生き延びることができます。

  • It can dissolve in most subjects, and has powerful effects - including a state of delirium.

    ほとんどの対象物に溶けることができ、錯乱状態を含む強力な効果があります。

  • Subjects exposed become confused, start to hallucinate, and find it challenging to perform

    被験者は混乱し、幻覚を見始め、演技をすることが困難になります。

  • even basic tasks.

    基本的な作業でも

  • It can also cause some uncomfortable and distracting physical effects, including temporary blindness,

    また、一時的に目が見えなくなるなど、不快で気が散るような身体的な影響もあります。

  • a high heart rate, overheating, dry mouth, and skin disorders.

    心拍数の上昇、熱中症、口の渇き、皮膚障害などがあります。

  • But can it kill?

    しかし、殺せるのか?

  • Unlike many other chemical weapons, it has a very high lethal dose - with people needing

    他の多くの化学兵器とは異なり、非常に高い致死量を持っています。

  • to ingest around 450 milligrams to die from it, although testing is inconclusive.

    は450ミリグラム程度摂取しないと死なないと言われていますが、実験では結論が出ていません。

  • This makes it very different from other powerful chemical weapons, which could wipe out an

    そのため、他の強力な化学兵器とは大きく異なり、1つの国を消滅させることができます。

  • army or kill a scientist with a minor spill.

    些細なこぼれ話で、科学者を軍隊にしたり殺したりする。

  • BZ had the potential to change the face of warfare, letting armies win battles by rendering

    BZは、戦争のあり方を変える可能性を秘めています。

  • the opposing sideMad as a hatter, red as a beet, dry as a bone, and blind as a bat”,

    帽子屋のように狂っていて、ビートのように赤く、骨のように乾いていて、コウモリのように目が見えない」というのが相手側の言い分です。

  • as a famous mnemonic put it.

    有名なニーモニックが言っていました。

  • But this wasn't a drug invented for combat.

    しかし、これは戦闘用に発明された薬ではない。

  • BZ had actually been developed by a Swiss pharmaceutical company as an attempt to treat

    BZは、スイスの製薬会社が治療のために開発したものである。

  • gastrointestinal ailments and ulcers, but was repeatedly ruled out due to its severe

    胃腸の不調や潰瘍の原因になると言われていますが、その重症度から何度も除外されていました。

  • host of non-lethal but highly unpleasant side effects.

    致命的ではないが、非常に不快な副作用がある。

  • While it was quickly dropped as a drug, it was soon picked up by the US military for

    薬品としてはすぐに中止されたものの、すぐに米軍に拾われて

  • potential weaponization and was extensively tested on the Edgewood subjects.

    兵器化の可能性があり、エッジウッド被験者で広範囲にテストされた。

  • It even became the first chemical authorized for military use and was weaponized to be

    さらには、軍事利用が認められた最初の化学物質となり、兵器化されて

  • released by cluster bombs - but these plans would never be realized as the bombs were

    しかし、この計画は実現されず、クラスター爆弾は消滅しました。

  • destroyed in 1989 when the government downsized the program.

    1989年に政府がプログラムを縮小したため、破壊されました。

  • But BZ wouldn't be the only substance that the government would test on the Edgewood

    しかし、政府がエッジウッドでテストした物質はBZだけではなかった。

  • volunteers.

    のボランティアをしています。

  • Not all documents relating to the experiments are public, but the government did keep a

    実験に関するすべての文書が公開されているわけではありませんが、政府は、この実験のために

  • detailed list of the time the volunteers spent on different subjects.

    ボランティアがそれぞれのテーマに費やした時間の詳細なリスト。

  • Almost a third of volunteer hours were spent on incapacitating compounds, but another fourteen

    ボランティア時間のほぼ3分の1が無力化剤に費やされましたが、さらに14の

  • percent were spent on riot control techniques.

    パーセントが暴動鎮圧技術に費やされました。

  • This likely became much more prominent in the 1960s, as protests swept the nation.

    これが顕著になったのは、1960年代に入ってからの抗議運動の影響でしょう。

  • Sometimes typical crowd control methods didn't work, but the government didn't want to

    時には典型的な群集制御の方法ではうまくいかないこともあったが、政府は

  • resort to lethal force.

    致命的な力に頼ることになる。

  • They needed to find compounds like pepper spray and tear gas that are non-lethal in

    殺傷力のないペッパースプレーや催涙スプレーのような化合物を探す必要がありました。

  • most cases but can cause pain and discomfort - and usually send large groups running for

    ほとんどの場合、痛みや不快感を伴うことがあります。

  • cover and a place to wash their eyes out.

    のカバーと目を洗う場所を用意した。

  • Not all experiments involved direct exposure to chemicals.

    すべての実験が化学物質に直接触れるものではありません。

  • Sometimes the goal was to see how to avoid this exposure.

    時には、この露出をいかにして避けるかという目的もありました。

  • Some volunteers tried out new protective equipment and clothing.

    新しい保護具や衣服を試すボランティアもいました。

  • Others were subject to sleep deprivation to determine how well they could function under

    また、睡眠不足の状態でどれだけの機能を発揮できるかを確認するために、睡眠不足に陥る人もいました。

  • different circumstances.

    異なった状況で

  • Some of these tests may have been combined - as the government was likely interested

    これらのテストのいくつかは、政府が興味を持っていたこともあり、組み合わされていたかもしれません。

  • to see how the presence of drugs like BZ could impact mental performance on tests.

    BZのような薬物の存在がテストでの精神的なパフォーマンスにどのような影響を与えるかを確認するためです。

  • The government even tested alcohol and caffeine's effects on soldiers.

    政府は、アルコールやカフェインの兵士への影響をテストすることもあった。

  • But for 14.5% of the hours at Edgewood, the tests took on a darker note.

    しかし、エッジウッドの14.5%の時間は、テストが暗い雰囲気に包まれていました。

  • The roster is simply listed aslethal compounds”, but it's believed that this involved some

    この名簿には、単に「致死性化合物」と記載されていますが、これには、いくつかの

  • of the deadliest weapons ever created for war.

    戦争のために作られた史上最悪の兵器の一つ。

  • This includes some of the deadly nerve agents like Sarin that created the project, as well

    この中には、プロジェクトを生み出したサリンのような致命的な神経剤も含まれています。

  • as the notorious mustard gas that burned the soldiers of the First World War.

    第一次世界大戦で兵士たちを焼いた悪名高いマスタードガスのように。

  • Industrial-strength pesticides were also tested - but the US had no apparent intention of

    工業用の強力な殺虫剤もテストされたが、アメリカは明らかに

  • re-introducing any of them to the battlefield.

    そのうちの一人を再び戦場に投入する。

  • So why did they introduce them in testing?

    では、なぜテストで導入したのか。

  • Many of the tests involved nerve agent antidotes and reactivators, indicating that the US Army

    テストの多くは神経ガスの解毒剤や再活性化剤に関するものであり、米軍が

  • may have been trying to figure out how to best prepare for these substances if they

    は、これらの物質に対応するためにはどうすればよいかを考えていたのかもしれません。

  • were introduced in combat by an enemy.

    は、敵が戦闘中に導入したものです。

  • By testing them in small amounts and seeing how to bring soldiers back from the brink

    少量のテストで、兵士をいかにして危機から救うかを考える。

  • if they were poisoned, the government could equip its soldiers to survive a sudden chemical

    毒殺されても、政府は突然の化学物質に耐えられるように兵士を装備することができる。

  • attack.

    の攻撃を受けます。

  • But the government's secret testing ground would eventually come to an end.

    しかし、政府の秘密の実験場は、やがて終わりを迎えることになる。

  • It was the 1970s when the government began investigating the program after more reports

    政府がこのプログラムを調査し始めたのは、1970年代に入ってからのことです。

  • of long-term side effects of exposure began to surface.

    その結果、長期にわたる副作用が表面化し始めた。

  • In 1975, the program was terminated and all the current volunteers were removed.

    1975年、このプログラムは終了し、現在のボランティアはすべて外された。

  • The founder of the program, Dr. Van Murray Sim, had the run of the place for decades

    このプログラムの創始者であるバン・マーレイ・シム博士は、何十年もの間、この場所を運営していました。

  • - but soon he had been hauled before Congress to testify before lawmakers enraged that the

    - と激怒した議員たちの前で証言するために、すぐに議会に連れて行かれた。

  • government had been experimenting on soldiers.

    政府は兵士を使って実験をしていた。

  • The Army defended themselves, claiming that there were no serious injuries or deaths associated

    陸軍は、重大な負傷者や死亡者は出ていないと弁明しました。

  • with the program.

    プログラムで

  • However, top brass did admit that their recruitment process may have taken advantage of the soldiers.

    しかし、上層部は、彼らの採用プロセスが兵士を利用していたかもしれないことを認めた。

  • But future investigations of the program's documents would tell a different story.

    しかし、今後、このプログラムの文書を調査すれば、別の話になるだろう。

  • Once all the documents were unsealed, the government took action to help the soldiers

    すべての文書が公開されると、政府は兵士を助けるために行動を起こした。

  • who had been exposed.

    が露出していました。

  • Many had not even been told what substance they were being exposed to during the tests,

    多くの人は、実験中にどんな物質を浴びるのかさえ知らされていませんでした。

  • simply being placed in a wind tunnel as a substance was blown towards them.

    単に風洞に入れて物質を吹き付けるだけである。

  • It would have been difficult if not impossible for them to address any side effects they

    副作用があっても、それを解決することは不可能ではありませんでした。

  • had from the chemical agents in the years after their testing - but for the first time

    しかし、今回初めて、化学物質の影響を受けた

  • they had information and could seek help.

    彼らは情報を持ち、助けを求めることができた。

  • While most of the tests were of irritant agents only without side effects, the percentage

    副作用のない刺激性薬剤のみの試験が多い中、割合的には

  • who had been exposed to nerve agents or other lethal compounds were given extra attention.

    神経ガスやその他の致死性化合物にさらされた人には、特別な注意が払われました。

  • But for some, it might have been too late.

    しかし、ある人にとっては遅すぎたかもしれません。

  • The government would continue to investigate the experiments through 2004, and uncover

    政府は2004年まで実験の調査を続け、その結果を明らかにしていく。

  • the classified secrets.

    機密事項を公開します。

  • In the 1993 report, it was authorized to grant restitution to the families of test subjects

    1993年の報告書では、被験者の家族に返還金を与えることが認められていました。

  • who may have died of causes related to the experiments.

    実験に関連して死亡した可能性のある人たち。

  • But while over seven thousand test subjects were identified, the full number may never

    しかし、7,000人以上の被験者が確認されているにもかかわらず、その数は決して多くはありません。

  • be known - and with decades past since the tests, there is no way to investigate those

    知ることができます。また、テストから何十年も経っているため、それらを調査する方法もありません。

  • who had died since for links to the experiments.

    実験との関連性を指摘されて亡くなった人たちがいました。

  • But debates continue over the program's legacy.

    しかし、このプログラムのレガシー(遺産)については議論が続いている。

  • In the 1990s, lawsuits were filed over the program by veterans' rights organizations,

    1990年代に入ると、このプログラムをめぐって退役軍人の権利団体が訴訟を起こすようになりました。

  • but they were initially dismissed.

    が、当初は却下されていました。

  • In 2013, a judge ordered the government to provide the test subjects with all information

    2013年、裁判官は政府に対し、被験者にすべての情報を提供するよう命じました。

  • related to their well-being, but denied other claims of liability against the government.

    しかし、それ以外の責任については否定しました。

  • Psychiatrist Col. James Ketchum, who worked with many of the subjects, denied most of

    多くの被験者を担当した精神科医のジェームス・ケッチャム大佐は、ほとんどの被験者を否定しています。

  • the claims against the government - saying that any who died during their test periods

    テスト期間中に死亡した人は、政府に対する請求権を持っています。

  • likely died of unrelated causes.

    は、無関係な原因で亡くなったと思われます。

  • Ketchum claimed that Edgewood was probably the safest military location in the world

    ケッチャムは、エッジウッドが世界で最も安全な軍事拠点であると主張していた。

  • to spend two months.

    を2ヶ月間過ごしました。

  • But for the soldiers staring into the wind tunnel as the unknown and potentially deadly

    しかし、未知の、そして命に関わる可能性のある風洞を見つめる兵士たちにとっては

  • came towards them, they might have a different perspective.

  • For more on the deadliest weapons of war, check outWeapons Even the Military Made

    最強の戦争兵器については、「軍も作った兵器」をご覧ください。

  • Illegal”, or tryWhy Life of a WWI Soldier in the Trenches SUCKEDfor an in-depth

    違法」、あるいは「第一次世界大戦の塹壕の中の兵士の人生はなぜ最悪だったのか」など、詳細な

  • look at the era of chemical warfare.

    は、化学兵器の時代を見てみましょう。

There is a facility in Maryland, mostly used for housing military members and civilian

メリーランド州には、主に軍人や民間人を収容するための施設があります。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 実験 政府 被験 物質 テスト 兵士

米軍兵士への化学兵器の実験 (Chemical Weapons Experiments on US Soldiers)

  • 7 0
    Summer に公開 2021 年 08 月 15 日
動画の中の単語