Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • In the fall of 1347, 12 ships arrived at the Italian port of Messina carrying desirable

    1347年の秋、12隻の船がイタリアのメッシーナ港に到着した。

  • trade goods from the Black Sea region, as well as another, much less desirable cargo

    黒海地域からの貿易品や、あまり好ましくない別の貨物も

  • - the Bubonic Plague.

    - ブーボニック・ペストのことです。

  • Onlookers were horrified to find that most of the sailors on board these ships were dead,

    しかし、その船に乗っていた船員のほとんどが死んでいるのを見て、野次馬は愕然とした。

  • and the rest were gravely ill, covered in disgusting black boils that were oozing blood

    そして、残りの人たちは重症で、血がにじむような醜い黒い腫れ物に覆われていました。

  • and puss.

    と膿を出します。

  • Authorities quickly banished the ships from port, but it was too late - the incredibly

    政府はすぐに船を港から追い出しましたが、時すでに遅し、信じられないことに

  • contagious disease quickly ripped through the city, and eventually, throughout all of

    伝染病は瞬く間に街を駆け巡り、やがて全世界へと広がっていった。

  • Europe.

    ヨーロッパ。

  • All across the continents, people were struck with horrible symptoms - first, painfully

    大陸の至る所で、人々は恐ろしい症状に襲われました。

  • swollen lymph nodes and grotesque boils, quickly followed by fever and chills, vomiting and

    リンパ節が腫れ、グロテスクな腫れ物ができ、すぐに発熱と悪寒、嘔吐と

  • diarrhea, and debilitating aches and pains.

    下痢をしたり、衰弱した痛みを感じたりします。

  • Perhaps mercifully, death would quickly follow the onset of symptoms for most people who

    幸いなことに、ほとんどの人は症状が出た後、すぐに死に至ります。

  • caught the dreaded disease.

    は、恐ろしい病気にかかってしまいました。

  • People in the 14th century had no clue about how diseases spread, making containing the

    14世紀の人々は、病気がどのようにして広がっていくのかを知らなかったため、病気を封じ込めることができなかったのです。

  • plague next to impossible.

    ペストは不可能に近い。

  • It was commonly believed at the time that you could catch the disease through your eyes

    当時は、目から感染すると言われていました。

  • by looking at a person as they died, leading many to abandon sick family members to die

    人の死を見つめることで、多くの人が病気の家族を見捨てて死んでいきました。

  • a horrible, lonely death.

    恐ろしいほどの孤独な死が待っています。

  • Treatments were equally barbaric and ineffective - bloodletting, boil lancing, the burning

    治療も同様に野蛮で効果がありませんでしたが、瀉血、煮沸消毒、火傷

  • of herbs and vinegar baths were used to attempt to treat the sick, with little success.

    薬草や酢を使ったお風呂で病気を治そうとしましたが、なかなかうまくいきませんでした。

  • As the death toll mounted and the bodies began to pile up - literally - huge pits were dug

    犠牲者の数が増え、文字通り死体が積み重なると、巨大な穴が掘られた。

  • to bury the dead.

    死者を埋葬するために

  • One Italian historian wrote that layers of bodies were stacked on top of each other in

    あるイタリア人の歴史家は、遺体が何層にも重なっていて

  • these mass gravesjust as one makes lasagna with layers of pasta and cheese.”

    パスタとチーズを重ねてラザニアを作るように、これらの大量の墓を作る。

  • It was also commonly believed that the plague was a divine punishment from god, so many

    また、疫病は神からの天罰であると一般的に信じられていたため、多くの

  • tried to earn back his favor by killing heretics - thousands of Jews were massacred as the

    異端者を殺すことで好意を取り戻そうとし、何千人ものユダヤ人が虐殺されました。

  • plague raged throughout Europe.

    ヨーロッパではペストが猛威を振るっていた。

  • Flagellants were also a common sight - groups of people would travel from town to town,

    旗振り役もよく見かけられ、集団で町から町へと移動していました。

  • where they would perform gruesome and public acts of penance, such as beating themselves

    彼らは、自分自身を殴るなどの陰惨で公然とした懺悔の行為を行っていました。

  • with a leather whip tipped with pieces of sharp metal.

    尖った金属片がついた革製の鞭で。

  • The worst of the outbreak eventually subsided, likely due to a lack of new victims.

    新たな犠牲者が出なかったためか、最悪の事態はやがて収まった。

  • Within a 5 year period, the Black Death claimed the lives of an estimated 20 million Europeans

    黒死病は5年の間にヨーロッパの人々の約2,000万人の命を奪った。

  • - up to 1 third of the population.

    - 最大で人口の1/3を占めています。

  • The plague never really went away, though authorities learned important lessons that

    疫病は決して治ることはありませんでしたが、権力者たちは以下のような重要な教訓を得ました。

  • would help contain future outbreaks.

    これにより、今後の発生を抑えることができます。

  • Sailors arriving at Italian ports were subjected to a new precautionary measure - a period

    イタリアの港に到着した船員には、新たな予防措置として、一定の期間

  • of 40 days of isolation on board their ship before they would be allowed into port.

    船内で40日間隔離された状態になってから、入港が許可されます。

  • This was known as a quarantino, and it is the origin of the term quarantine that we

    これは検疫と呼ばれていたもので、検疫という言葉の由来は、私たちが

  • are all too familiar with today.

    は、今ではすっかりお馴染みになりました。

  • Although no outbreak has ever been as terrible as the Black Death of the 14th century, there

    14世紀の黒死病ほどひどい流行はありませんが、その中でも

  • are still an estimated 1,000 cases of Bubonic Plague around the world each year.

    は、現在でも世界中で毎年1,000件の水疱瘡患者が発生していると推定されています。

  • Plagues may be terrifyingly effective at killing humans, but we don't need the help of mother

    疫病は人間を殺すのに恐ろしく有効だが、母親の助けは必要ない。

  • nature to destroy one another.

    互いに破壊し合う性質がある。

  • Humans had been fighting each other since the dawn of time - war itself was nothing

    太古の昔から人間同士が戦っていて、戦争自体は何でもない。

  • new, but this particular war was unlike any that had come before it.

    しかし、この戦争はそれまでの戦争とは違っていた。

  • New military technologies and strategies led to unprecedented death and carnage, and forever

    新しい軍事技術と戦略は、未曾有の死と殺戮をもたらし、永遠に

  • changed the face of war during this worst time to be alive.

    この最悪の時代に、戦争の様相を変えたのです。

  • World War 1 began when the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated, plunging

    第一次世界大戦は、オーストリアのフランツ・フェルディナンド大公が暗殺されたことにより始まりました。

  • all of Europe into war in 1914.

    1914年、ヨーロッパ全土が戦争に巻き込まれた。

  • Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire - the Central Powers - faced

    ドイツ、オーストリア・ハンガリー、ブルガリア、オスマン帝国の4カ国は、中央集権国家として直面していました。

  • off against the Allies - Great Britain, France, Russia, Italy, Romania, Japan and the United

    連合国(イギリス、フランス、ロシア、イタリア、ルーマニア、日本、アメリカ)との戦い。

  • States.

    状態です。

  • The violence began almost immediately, with German forces marching through Belgium and

    ドイツ軍がベルギーを進軍してきて、すぐに暴力が始まった。

  • into France, leaving a trail of death and destruction in their wake.

    フランスに入ってきて、死と破壊の跡を残した。

  • Once the Germans came face to face with Allied forces in France, both sides dug in - literally.

    フランスでドイツ軍と連合軍が対峙したとき、双方は文字通りの意味での "塹壕 "を築いた。

  • They each built mazes of long, narrow trenches that marked the landscape like a jagged scar

    それぞれが細長い溝を迷路のように作って、ギザギザの傷跡のような風景を作っていた。

  • along the Western Front, and hunkered down to fight brutal, bloody trench warfare.

    西部戦線では、血みどろの塹壕戦に身を投じていた。

  • Life in the trenches was miserable.

    塹壕の中での生活は悲惨なものだった。

  • Soldiers on the front lines would spend weeks at a time in the trenches, constantly crouching

    最前線の兵士たちは、何週間も塹壕の中にいて、常にしゃがみ続けていた。

  • to avoid enemy fire, and battling the ever present threat of death.

    敵の攻撃を避けながら、常に死の危険と戦いながら。

  • The trenches were often filled with mud and infested with rats, which would scurry over

    塹壕の中は泥だらけで、ネズミが跳ね回っていた。

  • soldiers as they tried desperately to catch some sleep in their tiny dugouts.

    兵士たちは狭い壕の中で必死に睡眠をとろうとしていた。

  • Soldiers battled the elements, as well as ailments like trench foot, an infection that

    兵士たちは風雨と戦い、トレンチフットと呼ばれる感染症とも戦った。

  • would cause the tissue of the foot to die and could result in amputation, or Trench

    は足の組織が死んでしまい、切断される可能性がありますし、トレンチ

  • mouth, a painful infection of the gums.

    口の中で、歯茎に痛みを伴う感染が起こります。

  • Wearing uncomfortable gas masks made it nearly impossible for soldiers to breathe, and they

    違和感のあるガスマスクをつけていると、兵士たちは呼吸ができなくなってしまいます。

  • provided only marginal protection against the latest in war technology - chemical weapons

    最新の戦争技術である化学兵器に対しては、わずかな防御しかできませんでした。

  • like mustard and phosgene gas, which burned the eyes, nose, mouth and lungs, and could

    マスタードガスやホスゲンガスのように、目、鼻、口、肺を焼いたり

  • cause a painful, suffocating death at high enough doses.

    充分な量を摂取すると、苦痛を伴う窒息死を引き起こします。

  • As bad as conditions were in the trenches, it definitely beat being orderedover the

    塹壕の中での状況は最悪だったが、「上に行け」と命令されたことには勝るものがあった。

  • top”.

    top」です。

  • Trench warfare involved sending waves of soldiers, armed with rifles and bayonets, over the walls

    塹壕戦では、小銃と銃剣で武装した兵士の波が壁を越えて送られてきました。

  • of the trench and into the dangerous no-man's land between the lines.

    塹壕の外に出て、線と線の間の危険な無人地帯に入る。

  • As they rushed towards the enemy's trenches, jumping from crater to crater and dodging

    敵の塹壕に向かって突進しながら、クレーターからクレーターへと飛び移り、かわしながら

  • barbed wire, they would face the risk of being mowed down by machine gun fire, or being blown

    有刺鉄線に囲まれていると、機銃掃射を受けたり、吹き飛ばされたりする危険がある。

  • to bits by an artillery shell.

    砲弾で粉々になってしまった。

  • If by some miracle they managed to survive the meat grinder of No-Man's Land make it

    もしも奇跡的にノーマンズランドの肉挽き器から生き延びることができたら......。

  • to the other side's trenches, they'd be forced to engage in hand-to-hand combat, where

    相手側の塹壕に入って、直接対決をしなければならないのです。

  • it was either kill or be killed.

    殺すか殺されるかだった。

  • Trench warfare was incredibly brutal and deadly, producing astoundingly high numbers of casualties

    塹壕戦は非常に残酷で致命的なものであり、犠牲者の数は驚くほど多かった。

  • - as many as 300,000 men lost their lives at the 1916 Battle of the Somme alone.

    - 1916年のソンムの戦いだけで、30万人もの兵士が命を落としました。

  • By the time the war ended with Germany's surrender in 1918, World War 1 had claimed

    1918年にドイツが降伏して戦争が終わったとき、第1次世界大戦は、次のような状況になっていました。

  • the lives of at least 16 million soldiers and civilians, and left a further 21 million

    少なくとも1,600万人の兵士と民間人の命を奪い、さらに2,100万人の兵士と民間人の命を奪いました。

  • injured.

    を負傷しました。

  • Millions of men would spend the rest of their lives dealing with the long-term effects of

    何百万人もの男性が、長期的な影響を受けながら残りの人生を過ごすことになります。

  • exposure to gas, like severe burns, light sensitivity and breathing difficulties.

    ガスにさらされると、重度の火傷や光過敏症、呼吸困難などの症状が現れる。

  • Thousands others would have limbs amputated, and countless numbers of veterans would struggle

    何千人もの人々が手足を切断され、数え切れないほど多くの退役軍人が苦しんでいます。

  • with shell shock, or PTSD.

    シェルショック(PTSD)である。

  • An estimated 1 in 10 soldiers who saw action in World War 1 was killed, and the hardest

    第一次世界大戦では、出征した兵士の10人に1人が戦死したと言われていますが、その中でも最も過酷だったのが

  • hit were France and Germany, who had each sent up to 80 % of their 18-49 year old men

    がヒットしたのは、フランスとドイツで、それぞれ18歳から49歳の男性の80%までを送り込んでいます。

  • into war.

    戦争になった。

  • To add insult to injury, just as the war was winding down, the Spanish Flu outbreak erupted

    さらに、戦争が終盤に差し掛かった頃、スペイン風邪が大流行した。

  • in 1918.

    1918年のことです。

  • The deadly and extremely contagious flu virus spread quickly through the front, the hospitals

    致命的で非常に感染力の強いインフルエンザウイルスは、あっという間に前線に広がり、病院では

  • and military supply lines, eventually spreading through the entire globe and killing anywhere

    や軍の補給線にも影響を与え、最終的には地球全体に広がり、どこにいても殺される。

  • between 20 and 50 million more people who had just lived through a brutal war.

    苛酷な戦争を経験したばかりの人々が、2,000万人から5,000万人も増えたのです。

  • Between the unprecedented carnage of war and the deadly destruction of a global pandemic,

    未曾有の戦争とパンデミックによる破壊の狭間で。

  • 1918 was definitely one of the worst times to be alive.

    1918年は、間違いなく最悪の時代の一つであった。

  • As if living through the unimaginable carnage of World War 1 and the Spanish flu wasn't

    第一次世界大戦やスペイン風邪などの想像を絶する大惨事を経験した後だけに

  • bad enough, before long many survivors would be forced to live through yet another of the

    このような状況の中、多くの生存者がまた別の出来事を経験することになります。

  • worst times to be alive...

    worst times to be alive...

  • Less than a generation after the end of World War 1 - the war that was meant to bethe

    第一次世界大戦が終わって一世代も経たないうちに、「世界の終わり」となるはずだった戦争が終わりました。

  • war to end all wars” - fighting once again engulfed Europe in 1939.

    すべての戦争を終わらせるための戦争」と言われた1939年、ヨーロッパは再び戦いに包まれました。

  • As the Nazis ravaged Europe, the U.S. faced increasing pressure to join the war on the

    ナチスがヨーロッパを破壊していく中で、アメリカは、アメリカ国内での戦争への参加を求める圧力を強めていきました。

  • side of the Allies - Great Britain and France.

    連合国であるイギリスとフランスの側。

  • They held off, until 1941, when Japanese pilots bombed the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor,

    しかし、1941年、日本のパイロットが真珠湾の米海軍基地を爆撃したとき、彼らはそれを阻止した。

  • Hawaii.

    ハワイです。

  • The U.S. joined the war, and the Allies managed to turn the tide of war in their favor, forcing

    アメリカが参戦したことで、連合国側は戦局を有利に進めることができました。

  • the Nazis to surrender in May 1945.

    1945年5月にナチスを降伏させた。

  • But even after the end of the war in Europe, Germany's ally Japan refused to back down.

    しかし、ヨーロッパでの戦争が終わっても、ドイツの同盟国である日本は一歩も引かなかった。

  • All throughout the war, the U.S. had been in a heated arms race against Nazi scientists

    戦時中、アメリカはナチスの科学者たちと激しい軍拡競争を繰り広げていた。

  • to develop the world's first atomic bomb, and on July 16, 1945, American scientists

    世界初の原子爆弾を開発するために、1945年7月16日、アメリカの科学者たちは

  • secretely tested the product of their work in the New Mexican desert.

    その成果を、ニューメキシコの砂漠で密かにテストした。

  • With the world's first functional nuclear bomb in their hands, and Japan still refusing

    世界初の機能的な核爆弾を手にして、日本はまだ拒否している。

  • to surrender, the U.S. decided to use their next test to teach Japan a lesson, and exact

    アメリカは、次のテストで日本を懲らしめることにして、正確な

  • some revenge for the attack on Pearl Harbor.

    真珠湾攻撃への復讐のために。

  • Just after 11 A.M. on August 6, 1945, an American B-29 bomber flew low over the Japanese city

    1945年8月6日の午前11時過ぎ、アメリカのB-29爆撃機が日本の都市の上空を低空飛行した。

  • of Hiroshima.

    広島の

  • As it passed over the dense center of the city, the plane unleashed it's deadly payload

    密集した都心の上空を通過する際、飛行機は致命的な爆弾を投下した。

  • - a 9,000 pound uranium-235 atomic bomb named Little Boy, which was delivered by parachute.

    - リトルボーイ」と名付けられた9,000ポンドのウラン235原子爆弾を、パラシュートで運んだのです。

  • It detonated 2,000 feet over the city with the force of 15 tons of TNT.

    TNT15トン分の威力で、市街地の上空2,000フィートで爆発しました。

  • The resulting blast was so powerful that everything within 5 square miles of the epicenter was

    その結果、震源地から5平方マイル以内のすべての地域で、非常に強力な爆発が起こりました。

  • completely vaporized.

    完全に気化している。

  • Outside the zone of total destruction, shockwaves toppled buildings and started raging fires,

    全壊した地域以外では、衝撃によって建物が倒壊したり、火事が発生したりしました。

  • and thousands were crushed or burned to death.

    と、何千人もの人々が圧死や焼死した。

  • In total, the blast immediately killed at least 80,000 innocent Japanese citizens, and

    この爆発により、少なくとも8万人の罪のない日本国民が直ちに死亡し、また

  • many more would later die agonizing deaths due to radiation exposure.

    その結果、より多くの人が放射線による苦痛に満ちた死を迎えることになる。

  • When the Japanese Emperor still refused to surrender in the face of such unprecedented

    このような未曾有の事態に直面してもなお、日本の天皇が降伏しなかったのは

  • killing power and cruelty, the U.S. doubled down - 3 days later, another bomb was dropped

    力と残酷さを殺したアメリカは、3日後にまた原爆を投下した。

  • on the city of Nagasaki.

    長崎の街に。

  • Fat Man, a plutonium bomb, instantly killed another 40,000 people decimated the city,

    プルトニウム爆弾の「ファットマン」は、瞬時にしてさらに4万人を殺し、都市を壊滅させた。

  • and left thousands more suffering from the deadly effects of radiation exposure.

    その結果、何千人もの人々が放射能の影響で苦しんでいます。

  • Over the coming days and weeks, 10s of thousands more died from acute radiation poisoning - as

    その後、数日から数週間の間に、何万人もの人々が急性放射線障害で亡くなりました。

  • the radiation destroyed their digestive tract and bone marrow, they would experience intense

    放射線によって消化管や骨髄が破壊されると、強烈な印象を受ける。

  • nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, blistering and peeling skin, and ultimately an agonizing

    吐き気、嘔吐、下痢、水ぶくれや皮がむけるなどの症状が出て、最終的には苦しい思いをします。

  • death as their blood cells died and their internal organs hemorrhaged.

    血液細胞が死に、内臓が出血して死に至りました。

  • The bombings left lasting, long-term impacts, too, including permanent disfigurements, an

    原爆投下は、後遺症や死亡者を含む長期的な影響をもたらしました。

  • increased risk of reproductive issues, birth defects and cancer for those exposed.

    曝露された人の生殖問題、先天性欠損症、癌のリスクの増加。

  • The bombings would mark the first and only time that nuclear weapons have been used in

    核兵器が使用されたのは初めてであり、唯一のケースである。

  • war - and hopefully it stays that way.

    願わくば、このままでいてほしい。

  • Marking the dawn of the threat of nuclear annihilation, there's no doubt that 1945

    核兵器の脅威の幕開けとなった1945年は、間違いなく

  • was one of the worst times to be alive.

    は最悪の時代の一つであった。

  • There is plenty of history to choose from when it comes to choosing the worst time to

    最悪のタイミングを選ぶには、たくさんの歴史があります。

  • be alive in Europe or Asia, but surely this has got to be the worst time to be alive in

    ヨーロッパやアジアで生きていても、きっと今は最悪の時代になっているはずだ。

  • America...right?

    アメリカ...ですね。

  • Actually, there have definitely been worse times to be alive here, too

    実際には、ここで生きているのがもっと悪い時代も確かにあったのだが...。

  • Christopher Columbus arrived in the Bahamas in 1492 and undoubtedly changed the continent

    クリストファー・コロンブスは1492年にバハマに到着し、間違いなく大陸を変えた。

  • - and the fate of its native peoples - forever.

    - そして、その原住民の運命を永遠に変えてしまうのです。

  • Columbus' discovery set off a tide of European exploration of the New World, and made it

    コロンブスの発見により、ヨーロッパ人による新大陸開拓の流れが始まりました。

  • one of the worst times to be alive for the people who had called North America home for

    北アメリカを本拠地としていた人々にとっては、最悪の時代の一つとなった。

  • centuries.

    世紀。

  • Violence between settlers and locals was not uncommon, and the locals were frequently outmatched

    入植者と現地人との間の暴力は珍しいものではなく、現地人はしばしば劣勢に立たされていた。

  • against advanced European weaponry like steel swords and guns - brutal massacres of entire

    鋼の剣や銃などのヨーロッパの先進的な武器に対抗して、全体的に残忍な虐殺を行った。

  • tribes were tragically frequent.

    が悲惨なほど多かった。

  • Settlers also brought with them deadly diseases, which the locals had no immunity against,

    また、入植者は致命的な病気を持ち込んできたが、地元の人々はそれに対する免疫を持っていなかった。

  • and widespread outbreaks decimated local populations, at times killing up to 90% of those infected.

    時には感染者の90%が死亡することもあり、大規模な流行により地域住民は壊滅的な打撃を受けました。

  • As more and more Europeans arrived to settle in the New World, native populations were

    多くのヨーロッパ人が新世界に移住するようになると、先住民の人口は

  • unceremoniously - and often violently - kicked off of their traditional lands, a terrible

    自分たちの伝統的な土地から無情にも、そしてしばしば暴力的に追い出され、ひどい

  • trend that continued for centuries after the first Europeans arrived.

    この傾向は、最初のヨーロッパ人が到着した後も数世紀にわたって続いた。

  • These are just a few of the many contenders for the worst time to be alive in human history.

    これらは、人類史上最悪の時代の候補のほんの一部に過ぎません。

  • There are plenty of other options - like London in 1666, with yet another plague that killed

    1666年のロンドンのように、またしても疫病で死者が出てしまうなど、他にもたくさんの選択肢があります。

  • up to 1 in 5 Londoners and the Great Fire of London that destroyed 80% of the city.

    ロンドン市民の5人に1人の割合で、街の80%が焼失した「ロンドン大火」がありました。

  • Or consider how terrible it would have been to be alive in France in 1793, during the

    あるいは、1793年にフランスで生きていたら、どれほど恐ろしいことだったかを考えてみてください。

  • chaos and violence of the French Revolution, or in Russia in the 1930s, at the height of

    フランス革命の混乱と暴力、あるいは1930年代のロシアでの

  • Stalin's Great Purge and widespread famines.

    スターリンの大粛清と大規模な飢饉。

  • Looking even further back, it would have been terrible to live through the fall of Rome

    さらにさかのぼると、ローマの崩壊を生きていたら大変なことになっていたかもしれません。

  • in 476, witnessing the once mighty empire crumble and seeing the city sacked by barbarians.

    476年、かつての強大な帝国が崩壊し、街が蛮族に略奪されるのを目の当たりにした。

  • The year 536 AD might have been the worst time to be alive, as a volcanic eruption created

    西暦536年は、火山の噴火によって、生きている人にとって最悪の時代だったかもしれません。

  • a great cloud of ash and dust that blocked out the sun for a full 18 months.

    灰と塵の大雲で18ヶ月間も太陽が遮られました。

  • If you thought this video was fascinating, be sure and check out our other videos, like

    このビデオが魅力的だと思われた方は、以下のような他のビデオもぜひご覧ください。

  • this one calledWhat If A Kamikaze Pilot Survived?”, or perhaps you'll like this

    これは「もしも特攻隊員が生き残ったら」というものですが、他にもこんなものもあります。

  • other video instead.

    の代わりに他のビデオを使用します。

In the fall of 1347, 12 ships arrived at the Italian port of Messina carrying desirable

1347年の秋、12隻の船がイタリアのメッシーナ港に到着した。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B2 中上級 日本語 戦争 ヨーロッパ 兵士 最悪 アメリカ フランス

歴史上、最も悪い時代は? (What Was Worst Time to Be Alive in History)

  • 25 2
    Summer に公開 2021 年 05 月 17 日
動画の中の単語