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  • Narrator: Since before recorded history began,

  • people have been searching for ways to live longer.

  • But it has only been in the last thirty years that science has made any real progress

  • in understanding the fundamental question surrounding how we age and what can be done about it.

  • The primary cause of aging is really pretty simple.

  • We age because our cells age, and our telomeres get shorter.

  • The 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded for breakthrough research

  • on telomeres and their effects on aging.

  • What can we learn from the newly discovered link between telomeres and aging?

  • Dr. William H. Andrews has worked in the biotech industry for 31 years,

  • the last 19 years focused solely on the aging process.

  • Dr. Andrews earned his Ph.D. in Molecular and Population Genetics

  • and is presently the founder, President, and CEO of a biotech company

  • focused exclusively on identifying compounds that affect aging in human cells.

  • Dr. Andrews is one of the world's leading researchers on telomeres

  • and was one of the principal discoverers of both the RNA and protein components of human telomerase.

  • He is presently a named inventor on more than 60 U.S. issued telomerase patents.

  • Dr. Andrews has recently teamed up with Isagenix founder,

  • and Master Nutritional Formulator, John Anderson,

  • who is credited with creating some of the world's most effective nutritional formulations

  • over the past 30 years.

  • Their goal is to use this Nobel Prize winning research on telomeres and aging

  • to create the ultimate nutritional system for promoting telomere health.

  • [Clear Command]

  • Recently we have discovered that the science of human aging is really pretty simple.

  • We age because our cells divide and our telomeres get shorter.

  • What's a telomere?

  • Well, to answer that, let's zoom into a human's 100 trillion cells.

  • Every cell contains a nucleus with genes and chromosomes.

  • If you zoom in further, you see that the chromosomes

  • are made up of DNA molecules that are 100 million bases long, coiled up like a slinky.

  • There are long, repetitive sequences of DNA at the end of each of our chromosomes.

  • These sequences are called telomeres.

  • When a cell divides, the genetic material inside that cell needs to be copied.

  • This is called DNA replication.

  • During this process, enzymes that replicate a strand of DNA

  • are unable to continue replicating all the way to the end, which causes the loss of some DNA.

  • In the ends, if you remember, are where the telomeres are.

  • At birth we have about 10,000 bases,

  • but as we age and our cells divide again and again, we lose those bases.

  • And at 5,000 bases we begin to die of old age.

  • As telomeres get shorter, humans begin to experience the general effects of aging,

  • loss of muscle, failing memory, poor eyesight, lack of energy, and slower recovery after exercise.

  • The bottom line is this, when cells divide, telomeres shorten

  • and bad things happen when telomeres get short.

  • As an analogy, think of DNA as a long row of bricks

  • and of DNA replication as a bricklayer walking backwards on top of a brick wall,

  • laying a new layer on top of that row.

  • When the end of the wall is reached, the bricklayer

  • finds himself standing on top of the bricks he's supposed to replicate.

  • But since he can't put down a brick where is feet are,

  • he steps back and falls off the wall, leaving the very end of the wall bare.

  • As a result, the new copy of the wall is shorter.

  • Just like this brick wall was copied imperfectly, our DNA is unable to copy itself perfectly.

  • When a strand is replicated, the new strand is shorter than the old strand.

  • >> Initially, we thought there wasn't anything we could do to affect the aging process.

  • Now we know there are some things we can do, like some lifestyle changes,

  • specifically decreasing toxins in our body, addressing obesity, and improving our nutrition,

  • plus reducing physical, mental, and oxidative stress,

  • which are all key to slowing down the aging process.

  • But perhaps even more significant than this,

  • scientific research has concluded that the next big step to maintaining a youthful body

  • is to find strategies to actually lengthen our telomeres,

  • essentially turning back our biological clock.

  • >> Research we completed in 1997 established that humans

  • also have an enzyme called telomerase that can lengthen telomeres.

  • This research was so significant

  • that in 2009 it was awarded the Nobel Price physiology or medicine.

  • Let me explain this research further.

  • We know that there must e a way for our bodies to re-lengthen telomeres,

  • because our reproductive cells do not exhibit telomere shorting and show no signs of aging.

  • The reason these cells are essentially immortal is because

  • reproductive cells produce an enzyme, called telomerase.

  • Telomerase acts like an assembly line inside our cells

  • that adds nucleotides to the ends of our chromosomes, thus lengthening our telomeres.

  • In a cell that expresses telomerase, telomeres are lengthened as soon as they shorten.

  • It's as though every time the telomere cock inside our cell ticks once,

  • telomerase pushes the hands of the clock back one tick.

  • Returning to the analogy of the bricklayer that can't lay the last brick on the brick wall,

  • telomerase would be like an angel that flies in and puts the last brick in place.

  • The telomerase gene exists in all our cells.

  • That's because the DNA in every one of our cells is identical:

  • a skin cell, muscle cell, and liver cell all contain exactly the same genetic information.

  • So, if the cells that create our sperm and egg cells contain the code for telomerase,

  • every other cell must contain the code as well.

  • >> In 1997, we inserted the telomerase gene into normal human skin cells grown in a Petri dish.

  • When they observed that the telomerase enzyme was being produced in these cells,

  • we then assade the telomere lengths, we noticed that the skin cells were essentially becoming immortal.

  • There was virtually no limit to the number of times the cells could divide.

  • When the lengths of the telomeres were assade and we got the results in,

  • we observed that the telomerized cells had actually lengthened their telomeres

  • rather than seeing the telomeres get shorter.

  • The critical question, then, was whether or not the cells were becoming younger.

  • A few years later, another lab inserted the telomerase gene,

  • the same gene we were using that already had very short telomeres.

  • These cells were then grown into the skin of the back of mice.

  • Now, in this experiment they had old mice, young mice, and telomerized mice.

  • When looking at the old mice, we noticed that the skin was getting wrinkled.

  • It blistered easily and we noticed some gray hair.

  • As for the young and telomerized mice, there was virtually no difference.

  • When we looked at the gene expression patterns between the young

  • and telomerized mice, we noticed that the genes being expressed were virtually identical between the two.

  • This created very exciting possibilities for us,

  • because it was the first evidence showing that telomerized cells actually returned to a young morphology.

  • They look young.

  • They express the same genes as young cells and this is where the impact of telomerase on aging

  • is truly going to have a lot of potential and excitement.

  • >> This leading edge science has created exciting possibilities in the field of anti-aging,

  • possibilities that were only dreamed up until the impact on telomerase on aging was discovered.

  • The reason most of our cells don't express telomerase is that the gene is repressed in them,

  • however, if the appropriate compound, the right botanical, phytonutrient, or combination is found,

  • science may be able to assist the body to de-repress telomerase,

  • turning on the gene that's already present in every cell in the human body.

  • I lead a team of scientists pursuing this line of research.

  • And we are virtually the only scientists pursuing it.

  • We have made significant progress in understanding the underlying science behind telomerase induction.

  • We have studied and tested more than 300,000 drugs, chemicals, and compounds

  • to document their effect on supporting telomere health.

  • My biotech company developed the only high-throughput screening system in the world

  • that is capable of screening for telomerase inducers.

  • Our recent collaboration with John Anderson's 30 years of formulating experience,

  • and our strategic alliance with Isagenix' decade of proven transformational results,

  • is yielding results beyond anything we have ever experienced.

  • It won't be surprising to see many companies trying to enter this space

  • and begin marketing products how to support telomeres.

  • But I know from my research not all telomere products are the same.

  • One company is leading the way with a complete system

  • that not only addresses the causes of aging,

  • but also provides a credible product system to effectively support healthy telomeres.

  • As the search for a viable method to activate telomerase and lengthen telomeres continues,

  • each of us must do what we can to adopt a healthy lifestyle and support our telomere health

  • with the hope that one day that magic bullet will exist.

  • The good news is, there are strategies that you can immediately employ

  • to provide telomere support that may slow the aging process.

  • The first step to improve your chances of living longer and healthier

  • is to control factors that are known to affect aging,

  • such as toxicity, obesity, poor dietary and exercise habits, and oxidative stress.

  • The next step is to assist the body with science-based, targeted nutrition to provide telomere support.

  • I have dedicated my life to exploring the science of aging and how we might slow the aging process.

  • Like you, as I get older, I want to look and feel half my age.

  • I want to compete in a 100 mile race at 100 years old.

  • This remarkable research may one day reveal the secret of living a longer, healthier life.

  • I am grateful for the opportunity I've had to share it with you.

  • Narrator: Contact the person who shared this video with you.

  • Discover which Isagenix product system is best for you.

  • [Clear Command]

  • [Clear Command]

  • [Clear Command]

Narrator: Since before recorded history began,

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テロメアと老化(本編 (Telomeres and Aging (Full length))

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    Precious Annie Liao に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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