Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • You've probably heard by now

    もうお聞きになったことがあると思いますが

  • that economic inequality is historically high,

    経済的な不平等が歴史的に高いこと。

  • that the wealthiest one-tenth of one percent in the United States

    アメリカの10分の1の富裕層は

  • have as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent combined,

    は、底辺の90%を合わせたものと同じくらいの富を持っています。

  • or that the wealthiest eight individuals in the world

    あるいは世界で最も裕福な8人の個人が

  • have as much wealth

    豊かになる

  • as the poorest 3.5 billion inhabitants of the planet.

    地球上で最も貧しい35億人の住民として

  • But did you know that economic inequality is associated with shorter lifespans,

    しかし、経済的な不平等が寿命の短縮と関連していることを知っていましたか?

  • less happiness,

    より少ない幸せ。

  • more crime

    増罪

  • and more drug abuse?

    と、より多くの薬物乱用?

  • Those sound like problems of poverty,

    それらは貧困の問題のように聞こえます。

  • but among wealthy, developed nations

    しかし、裕福な先進国の間では

  • those health and social problems

    健康と社会問題

  • are actually more tightly linked to inequality between incomes

    は、実際には所得の不平等とより密接に結びついています。

  • than to absolute incomes.

    絶対所得に比べて

  • And because of that,

    そして、そのおかげで

  • the United States,

    アメリカの

  • the wealthiest and the most unequal of nations,

    最も裕福で最も不平等な国

  • actually fares worse than all other developed countries.

    実際には他の先進国よりも劣っています。

  • Surveys show that large majorities of Americans,

    調査によると、アメリカ人の大多数が

  • both Democrats and Republicans,

    民主党も共和党も

  • believe inequality is too high and want more equal pay.

    不平等は高すぎると思っていて、もっと平等な賃金を求めている。

  • And yet as a society, we don't seem to be able to find the common ground,

    それなのに、社会としての共通点を見つけられないようです。

  • the consensus, the political will to do anything about it.

    コンセンサス、政治的な意思を持って何かをしようとしている。

  • Because, as inequality has risen in recent decades,

    なぜなら、ここ数十年で不平等が高まっているように

  • political polarization has risen along with it.

    それに伴って政治の二極化が進んでいます。

  • We see those who disagree with us as idiots or as immoral.

    自分と意見が合わない人を馬鹿にしたり、不道徳と見たりします。

  • Nearly half of Democrats and Republicans

    民主党と共和党の半数近くが

  • now think that the other side is not just mistaken

    あちら側が勘違いしているだけではないと思うようになった

  • but a threat to the nation.

    しかし、国家にとっては脅威です。

  • And that animosity prevents us from finding the common ground

    そして、その反感が共通点を見つけることを妨げています。

  • to change things.

    物事を変えるために

  • I'm a social psychology professor at the University of North Carolina,

    ノースカロライナ大学の社会心理学の教授です。

  • and I study the effects of inequality on people's thinking and behavior.

    と、人の思考や行動に与える不平等の影響を研究しています。

  • I'm going to argue that it's not just an unfortunate coincidence

    ただの不幸な偶然ではないと主張します

  • that inequality and political division have risen together.

    不平等と政界の分裂が一緒に起きていることを

  • There are good psychological reasons

    良い心理的理由がある

  • that inequality drives wedges in our politics.

    不平等が政治に楔を打ち込むのです

  • That means there are good psychological paths

    ということは、心理的にも良い道があるということ

  • to improve both at once.

    を使って、両方を一気に改善することができます。

  • To understand why inequality is so powerful,

    不平等がなぜ強力なのかを理解するために

  • you have to first understand that we are constantly comparing ourselves

    まず理解しなければならないのは、私たちは常に自分自身を比較しているということです。

  • to other people,

    他の人に

  • and when we do that,

    と、その時のことを話しています。

  • we really like to come out on top,

    私たちは本当にトップで出てくるのが好きなんです。

  • and we find it painful to be on the bottom.

    と、底辺であることを痛感しています。

  • Psychologists call it the "better-than-average effect."

    心理学者はこれを "平均以上の効果 "と呼んでいます。

  • Most people believe they're better than average

    大抵の人は自分が平均より優れていると思っている

  • at just about anything they care about,

    彼らが気にしていることは何でも

  • which isn't strictly possible, because that's just what average means.

    厳密にはそうではないが、それはあくまでも平均値の意味だからだ。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But that's the way people feel.

    でも、それが人の気持ちなんです。

  • Most people think they're smarter than average,

    大抵の人は平均より頭がいいと思っている。

  • harder working than average

    働き者

  • and more socially skilled.

    と、より社会的なスキルを身につけることができるようになりました。

  • Most people think they're better drivers than average.

    大抵の人は、平均よりも良いドライバーだと思っています。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • That's true even if you do the study with a sample of people

    人のサンプルで勉強してもそうなる

  • currently hospitalized for a car accident that they caused.

    現在、自分たちが起こした交通事故で入院中です。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So we really want to see ourselves as better than average,

    だから、私たちは自分たちが平均よりも優れていることを本当に見たいと思っています。

  • and if we find out otherwise,

    そうでないことが分かれば

  • it's a painful experience that we have to cope with.

    対処しなければならないのは辛い経験です。

  • And we cope with it by shifting how we see the world.

    そして、私たちは世界の見方を変えることで、それに対処します。

  • To understand how this works,

    その仕組みを理解するために

  • my collaborators and I ran an experiment.

    私の協力者と私は実験をしました

  • We asked participants to complete a decision-making task to earn some money,

    参加者には、お小遣い稼ぎのための意思決定タスクを完了させてもらいました。

  • and in reality, everyone earned the same amount of money.

    と現実にはみんな同じ金額を稼いでいました。

  • But we randomly divided them into two groups,

    でも、無作為に2つのグループに分けました。

  • and we told one group that they had done better than average,

    とあるグループに伝えたところ、平均よりも良い結果が出たとのことでした。

  • and we told the other group they had done worse than average.

    と他のグループに伝えたところ、平均よりも悪い結果になってしまいました。

  • So now we have one group that feels richer and one group that feels poorer,

    豊かさを感じるグループと、貧しさを感じるグループがあります。

  • but for no objective reason.

    しかし、客観的な理由はありません。

  • And then we asked them some questions.

    そして、いくつか質問をしてみました。

  • When we asked them, "How good are you at making decisions?"

    "判断力は?"と聞いたところ、"判断力は?"とのこと。

  • the better-than-average group said that they were more competent

    平均よりも優秀なグループは、能力が高いと答えた

  • than the below-average group.

    平均以下のグループよりも

  • The better-than-average group said that their success

    平均よりも優れたグループは、自分たちの成功を

  • was a fair outcome of a meritocracy.

    は実力主義の公平な結果だった。

  • The below-average group thought the system was rigged,

    平均以下のグループは、システムが仕掛けられていると思っていた。

  • and in this case, of course, they were right.

    そして、この場合は、もちろん、彼らの言う通りでした。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Even though the two groups had the same amount of money,

    2つのグループが同じ金額を持っていたにもかかわらず。

  • the group that felt richer said we should cut taxes on the wealthy,

    富裕層を感じる会は富裕層の減税をすべきだと言っていました。

  • cut benefits to the poor.

    貧困層への給付金を削減する

  • Let them work hard and be responsible for themselves, they said.

    頑張らせてあげて、自分に責任を持たせてあげてくださいと。

  • These are attitudes that we normally assume are rooted in deeply held values

    これらは、私たちが普段から考えている価値観に根ざした態度です。

  • and a lifetime of experience,

    と生涯の経験を積むことができます。

  • but a 10-minute exercise

    でも10分運動

  • that made people feel richer or poorer

    貧富の差

  • was enough to change those views.

    は、それらの見解を変えるのに十分でした。

  • This difference between being rich or poor and feeling rich or poor is important,

    この金持ちか貧乏人かの違いと、金持ちか貧乏人かの感覚の違いが重要です。

  • because the two don't always line up very well.

    この二つは必ずしもうまく一致するとは限らないからです。

  • You often hear people say with nostalgia,

    懐かしさでよく言われますよね。

  • "We were poor, but we didn't know it."

    "私たちは貧しかったが、それを知らなかった"

  • That was the case for me growing up,

    大人になってからもそうでした。

  • until one day,

    ある日まで。

  • in the fourth-grade lunch line,

    4年生の給食の列で

  • we had a new cashier who didn't know the ropes,

    ロープを知らない新しいレジ係がいました。

  • and she asked me for 1.25 dollars.

    と聞かれ、1.25ドルを要求されました。

  • I was taken aback, because I had never been asked to pay for my lunch before.

    今までお弁当代を要求されたことがなかったので、呆れてしまいました。

  • I didn't know what to say, because I didn't have any money.

    お金がなかったので、何を言っていいのかわからなかった。

  • And suddenly, I realized for the first time

    そして、突然、初めて気がついたのですが

  • that we free lunch kids were the poor ones.

    私たちフリーランチの子供たちが貧乏人だったことを

  • That awkward moment in the school lunch line

    給食の列での気まずい瞬間

  • changed so much for me,

    私の中で大きく変わりました。

  • because for the first time, I felt poor.

    初めて貧乏くさいと思ったから。

  • We didn't have any less money than the day before,

    前日よりもお金が減ることはありませんでした。

  • but for the first time,

    が、初めてです。

  • I started noticing things differently.

    違うことに気づくようになりました。

  • It changed the way I saw the world.

    世界の見え方が変わりました。

  • I started noticing how the kids who paid for their lunch

    お弁当代を払った子供たちの様子が気になり始めた

  • seemed to dress better than the free lunch kids.

    無料のお弁当の子供たちよりも格好が良さそうでした。

  • I started noticing the big yellow blocks of government cheese

    政府のチーズの大きな黄色いブロックが目につくようになりました。

  • that showed up at our door

    玄関先に現れた

  • and the food stamps my mother would pull out at the grocery store.

    そして母が食料品店で引き取っていたフードスタンプ。

  • I was always a shy kid,

    私は昔から人見知りの子供でした。

  • but I hardly talked at all after that at school.

    と言っても、それ以降は学校ではほとんど喋りませんでした。

  • Who was I to speak up?

    私は何者なんだ?

  • For decades, social scientists looked for evidence

    何十年もの間、社会科学者は証拠を探していました。

  • that feeling deprived compared to other people

    人並み外れた貧しさ

  • would motivate political action.

    が政治的行動の動機付けになるのではないでしょうか。

  • They thought it would mobilize protests, strikes,

    抗議やストライキの動員になると思ったんだろうな

  • maybe even revolutions.

    もしかしたら革命かもしれない

  • But again and again what they found was that it paralyzed people,

    しかし、何度も何度も発見したのは、それが人を麻痺させているということでした。

  • because the truth is,

    なぜなら、真実があるからです。

  • feeling less than other people

    人一倍

  • brings shame.

    恥をかくことになる。

  • It makes people turn away,

    人の目を背けさせてしまう。

  • disgusted with the system.

    体制に嫌気がさした。

  • Feeling better than other people, though --

    他の人よりも気分がいいと思っている

  • now that is motivating.

    今はやる気が出てきました。

  • It motivates us to protect that position,

    その立場を守りたいというモチベーションになります。

  • and it has important consequences for our politics.

    そして、それは私たちの政治にとって重要な結果をもたらします。

  • To see why, consider another experiment.

    その理由を知るために、別の実験を考えてみましょう。

  • Again, we asked participants to make decisions to earn some money,

    今回も、参加者の方には、ある程度のお金を稼ぐための判断をしてもらいました。

  • and we told one group that they had done better than average

    とあるグループには、平均よりも良い成績を収めたと伝えました。

  • and the other group that they had done worse than average.

    と他のグループが平均よりも悪い成績を残していたことがわかりました。

  • And again, the better-than-average group said it's a fair meritocracy,

    またしても平均より上のグループが公平な実力主義だと言ってたな

  • cut taxes on the wealthy,

    富裕層への減税を

  • cut benefits on the poor.

    貧困層への給付金を削減する

  • But this time, we also asked them what did they think

    しかし、今回は「どう思うか」ということも聞いてみました。

  • about other participants who disagree with them

    自分と意見が合わない他の参加者について

  • on those issues.

    それらの問題について

  • Are they smart or incompetent?

    頭がいいのか、無能なのか。

  • Are they reasonable or are they biased?

    理にかなっているのか、偏っているのか。

  • The better-than-average group said anybody who disagrees with them

    平均以上のグループは、彼らに同意しない人は誰でも言っていた

  • must be incompetent, biased,

    無能で偏っているに違いない。

  • blinded by self-interest.

    私利私欲に目がくらんだ

  • The below-average group

    平均以下のグループ

  • didn't assume that about their opponents.

    対戦相手のことを想定していなかった。

  • Now, there are lots of psychology studies

    今は心理学の勉強がたくさん

  • showing that when people agree with us,

    人々が私たちに同意したときに、それを示しています。

  • we think they're brilliant,

    私たちは彼らが素晴らしいと思っています。

  • and when people disagree with us,

    と、反対された時に

  • we tend to think they're idiots.

    バカだと思われがちです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But this is new because we found it was driven entirely by the group

    しかし、これは新しいことで、私たちはそれが完全にグループによって駆動されていることを発見したので

  • that felt better than average,

    平均よりも良いと感じた

  • who felt entitled to dismiss those people who disagree with them.

    自分と意見が合わない人を解任する権利があると感じていた人たち。

  • So think about what this is doing to our politics,

    これが私たちの政治に何をしているのか考えてみてください。

  • as the haves and have-nots spread further and further apart.

    持っている人と持っていない人がどんどん離れていく中で

  • Yes, a lot of us think that people on the other side are idiots,

    そう、向こう側の人間はバカだと思っている人が多いのです。

  • but the people politically engaged enough to be yelling at each other about politics

    が、政治について怒鳴り散らすほど政治的に関わっている人たちは

  • are actually mostly the well-off.

    は実際にはほとんどが裕福な人たちです。

  • In fact, as inequality has grown in recent decades,

    実際、ここ数十年で不平等が拡大したように

  • political interest and participation among the poor has plummeted.

    貧困層の政治的関心と参加が急落している。

  • Again, we see that people who feel left behind

    繰り返しになりますが、取り残されたと感じている人は

  • aren't taking to the streets to protest or organize voter registration drives.

    抗議や有権者登録運動のために街頭に出ているわけではありません。

  • Often, they aren't even voting.

    投票すらしていないことが多い。

  • Instead, they're turning away and dropping out.

    その代わり、目を背けて脱落していく。

  • So if we want to do something about extreme inequality,

    だから極端な不平等をどうにかしたいなら

  • we have to fix our politics.

    政治を立て直さなければならない

  • And if we want to fix our politics,

    そして、政治を立て直したいなら

  • we have to do something about inequality.

    不平等をどうにかしないと

  • So what do we do?

    で、どうすればいいの?

  • The wonderful thing about spirals

    スパイラルの素晴らしいところ

  • is that you can interrupt at any point in the cycle.

    は、サイクルのどの時点でも割り込みができるということです。

  • I think our best bet starts with those of us

    私たちの最善の賭けは、私たちのものから始まると思います。

  • who have benefited the most from inequality's rise,

    不平等の高まりから最も恩恵を受けているのは

  • those of us who have done better than average.

    平均以上の成績を残している人は

  • If you've been successful,

    成功しているのであれば

  • it's natural to chalk up your success to your own hard work.

    自分の頑張りを成功に結びつけるのは当然のことです。

  • But, like the studies I showed you,

    でも、私が見せた研究のように

  • everybody does that,

    誰もがそうする

  • whether or not it really was the hard work that mattered most.

    本当に一番大事な苦労だったのかどうか。

  • Every successful person I know

    私が知っている成功者は皆

  • can think of times when they worked hard and struggled to succeed.

    一生懸命働いて、成功するために苦労した時のことを思い浮かべることができる。

  • They can also think of times

    彼らはまた、時代を考えることができます。

  • when they benefited from good luck or a helping hand

    縁起が良い時

  • but that part is harder.

    でも、そこが難しいんです。

  • Psychologists Shai Davidai and Tom Gilovich

    心理学者のシャイ・ダヴィダイとトム・ジロビッチ

  • call it the "headwind-tailwind asymmetry."

    "向かい風-追い風の非対称性 "と呼ばれています

  • When you're struggling against headwinds,

    逆風と格闘している時に

  • those obstacles are all you can see.

    それらの障害物は、あなたが見ることができるすべてのものです。

  • It's what you notice and remember.

    それはあなたが気付いて覚えていることです。

  • But when the wind's at your back and everything's going your way,

    でも、風が背中に来て、全てが自分の思い通りになると

  • all you notice is yourself

    自分のことしか考えていない

  • and our own amazing talents.

    そして、私たち自身の素晴らしい才能。

  • So we have to stop and think for a minute

    だから、ちょっと立ち止まって考える必要があります。

  • to recognize those tailwinds helping us along.

    追い風が私たちを助けてくれていることを認識しています。

  • It's so easy to see what's wrong with people

    人の何が悪いのかが一目瞭然

  • who disagree with you.

    あなたの意見に反対する人

  • Some of you decided that I was an idiot in the first two minutes,

    最初の2分で「俺はバカだ」と決めつけた人もいましたね。

  • because I said inequality was harmful.

    不平等は有害だと言ったから

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • The hard part is to recognize

    難しいのは

  • that if you were in a different position,

    もしあなたが違う立場だったら

  • you might see things differently,

    違った見方をするかもしれません。

  • just like the subjects in our experiments.

    実験の被験者のように

  • So if you're in the above-average group in life --

    だから、あなたが人生の平均以上のグループにいるならば...

  • and if you're watching a TED talk, you most likely are --

    TEDの講演を見ている人は、たいていそうだと思いますが...

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • then I leave you with this challenge:

    ならば、私はあなたにこの課題を残します。

  • the next time you're tempted to dismiss someone who disagrees with you

    今度からは自分の意見を否定したくなる

  • as an idiot,

    馬鹿にして

  • think about the tailwinds that helped you get where you are.

    追い風のおかげで今の場所に辿り着いたことを考えてみてください。

  • What lucky breaks did you get

    どんなラッキーブレイクがあったのか

  • that might have turned out differently?

    違った結果になったかもしれない

  • What helping hands are you grateful for?

    どんな助っ人に感謝していますか?

  • Recognizing those tailwinds gives us the humility we need

    追い風を認識することは、私たちに必要な謙虚さを与えてくれます。

  • to see that disagreeing with us doesn't make people idiots.

    私たちの意見に反対しても人はバカにはならないということがわかる

  • The real hard work is in finding common ground,

    本当に大変なのは、共通点を見つけることです。

  • because it's the well-off who have the power

    富裕層が力を持っているから

  • and the responsibility to change things.

    と、物事を変えていく責任感を持っています。

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

You've probably heard by now

もうお聞きになったことがあると思いますが

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 平均 平等 グループ 政治 富裕 心理

不平等と政治的分裂の心理学|キース・ペイン (The psychology of inequality and political division | Keith Payne)

  • 5 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2020 年 10 月 23 日
動画の中の単語