Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • the Mona Lisa was stolen by that horrible tyrant, Napoleon Bonaparte.

    モナリザはあの恐ろしい暴君ナポレオン・ボナパルトに盗まれました。

  • Well, it wouldn't be in the hands of those French bullies for long.

    フランスのいじめっ子の手には渡らないだろうな

  • Vincenzo Perugia was going to commit the greatest theft of the twentieth century, and the French could kiss his cool.

    ヴィンチェンツォ・ペルージャは 20世紀最大の窃盗を犯そうとしていた フランス人は彼に冷静なキスをすることができた

  • Oh, he didn't even much like that grinning damsel, the girl who perpetually looks a sconce at all the fawning fans that sit it or alter.

    ああ、彼はあのニヤニヤした乙女のような女の子もあまり好きではありませんでした。

  • But it would be hiss, and one day it would be returned to its rightful owners.

    しかし、それはヒスになり、いつか元の持ち主に戻されるだろう。

  • Mr.

    旦那

  • Perugia was an audacious thief.

    ペルージャは大胆な泥棒だった。

  • He was a celebrated patriot, and he almost pulled it off.

    愛国者として名を馳せていた彼は、危うくそれを引きずり落としそうになった。

  • Almost he would have if it weren't for those pesky backstabbing weasels.

    厄介な裏切り者たちがいなければ、ほとんど彼はそうしていただろう。

  • Okay, so we get.

    分かったわ

  • Some of you aren't familiar with the Mona Lisa, Not everyone's an art critic.

    モナリザを知らない人もいるだろうし、誰もが美術評論家ではないだろう。

  • And when you've grown up on a strict diet of grand theft auto in days of our lives, there's not much time for classical art.

    厳格な食生活で育った日々の中で大盗りオートを見ていると、古典芸術に触れる時間はあまりありません。

  • The Mona Lisa is a big deal.

    モナリザは大したものだ。

  • It's the most visited, best known and most parodied artwork in the world.

    世界で最も多くの人が訪れ、最も知られ、最もパロディ化された作品です。

  • It's also expensive.

    値段も高いですしね。

  • It holds the record for the insurance value of an artwork that was one hundred million dollars back in nineteen sixty two, which is around eight hundred fifty eight million in today's money.

    1962年に1億ドルだった美術品の保険価値の記録を保持しており、現在の貨幣では約8億5,800万ドルとなっています。

  • Why so expensive?

    なんでそんなに高いの?

  • What's so special about it?

    何か特別なことがあるのか?

  • Well, we're talking about the art world, a topsy turvy world that doesn't make much sense.

    まあ、アートの世界の話をしてるんだから、あまり意味のないトゲトゲした世界だよね。

  • You could scribble with paint like a child in the painting might fetch over forty six million dollars or paint something that looks like you might paint a bedroom wall and you might get over eighty four million.

    あなたは絵の中の子供のように絵の具で落書きすることができ、あなたが寝室の壁をペイントするかもしれないように見える何かをペイントして、あなたは8400万以上を取得する可能性があります4600万ドル以上を取得するかもしれません。

  • So while there's no doubt that the Mona Lisa took a bit more effort and skill the paint than some atrocious and plausibly expensive modern art, it's not really any better than many paintings created by people living out of trailers and surviving on rations of hostess Twinkies.

    だから、モナリザは、いくつかの非道い、もっともらしい高価な現代美術よりも、もう少し努力と技術を要したことは間違いありませんが、トレーラーで生活し、ホステスのトゥインキーの配給で生き延びている人々によって描かれた多くの絵画よりも、実際には何も優れているわけではありません。

  • The art world deems the Mona Lisa valuable, and that's that it is valuable for this reason.

    芸術の世界ではモナリザが価値あるものとされていますが、それはこのような理由で価値があるということです。

  • Thousands of people go to see it every day at the loop in France, and that's why it's kept behind bulletproof glass.

    フランスのループでは毎日何千人もの人が見に行っていますが、それが防弾ガラスの裏に保管されている理由です。

  • We should also say the amazing story you're about to hear is added a lot to its value.

    また、これから聞くであろうすごい話が、その価値に大きく加味されていると言うべきでしょう。

  • Who is the woman?

    その女性は誰ですか?

  • She looks pretty drab and unprepossessing, to be honest, albeit she's a shifty looking gal that looks quite pleased with herself.

    正直、かなりドタバタしていて無愛想な感じのギャルで、自分ではかなり満足しているように見えますが。

  • Maybe that's because under those dark robe, she's hiding the cheese.

    その暗いローブの下にチーズを隠しているからかもしれません。

  • She just stole that or she just let one rip.

    彼女はそれを盗んだのか、それとも一人だけ裂いたのか。

  • Okay, enough of the childishness.

    子供じみたことはもういい

  • She was painted by Leonardo da Vinci at the beginning of the fifteen hundreds.

    彼女はレオナルド・ダ・ヴィンチによって描かれた15百年の初めに。

  • She was the wife of a fairly well off merchant named Francesco del Gioconda.

    彼女はフランチェスコ・デル・ジョコンダというかなり裕福な商人の妻だった。

  • Oh, a man who liked younger women, namely Lisa Del Gioconda, who married him at the young age of fifteen.

    ああ、年下の女性が好きだった男、つまりリサ・デル・ジョコンダは15歳の若さで結婚した。

  • Hey, her dowry was one hundred seventy Florence, so her family was content with the deal.

    持参金は170ドルだったから家族は納得してたよ

  • Mona or Mona likely relates to the word Madonna or just Lady and short.

    モナまたはモナは、おそらく単語マドンナまたは単にレディと短いに関連しています。

  • People in the past like this painting a lot.

    昔の人はこの絵が好きな人が多いですね。

  • Some people thought Lisa was quite the hottie.

    リサはかなりのイケメンだと思っていた人もいました。

  • She ended up with kings of France, and once she adorned the bedroom wall of Napoleon, people said she was enchanting, captivating, mysterious one nineteenth century art critic.

    彼女はフランスの王様と一緒に終わり、彼女はナポレオンの寝室の壁を飾った後、人々は彼女が魅惑的で、魅惑的で、神秘的な1つの19世紀の美術評論家だったと述べています。

  • When is far to call her a vampire?

    彼女を吸血鬼と呼ぶには、いつ頃が遠いのでしょうか?

  • When the twentieth century rolled around, she was dubbed one of the greatest artworks of all time, and then she went missing for a long time.

    20世紀が回ってきた頃、彼女は史上最高の芸術作品の一つと呼ばれ、その後、長い間行方不明になった。

  • Now we welcome to this story one, Vincenzo Perugia, the man that would become a national and, to some extent, an international hero.

    さて、今回はヴィンチェンツォ・ペルージャのお話をお届けします。国民的な、そしてある程度国際的な英雄となった男です。

  • We won't bore you with all that early life stuff.

    初期の人生を退屈させないためにも

  • Well, we couldn't if we tried because we don't know much about a young Peru Jha.

    まあ、若いペルージャのことをあまり知らないので、やろうと思ってもできませんでした。

  • We do know that he was fond of art.

    彼が芸術が好きだったことは知っています。

  • We also know that he had a job at the loop.

    ループで仕事をしていたこともわかっています。

  • One of his test in that job was to protect the paintings.

    その仕事での彼のテストの一つは、絵画を保護することでした。

  • You see, some folks back then were a bit peeved that artworks could be so expensive with them subsisting on bread and butter after all.

    当時の人々の中には、美術品がとても高価で、パンとバターで生活していたことに腹を立てていた人もいました。

  • And at times they go to the museum and spit at the paintings.

    そしてある時は美術館に行って絵画に唾を吐く。

  • Sometimes they attack works of art with a razor blade.

    時には剃刀で美術品を攻撃することもある。

  • For this reason, some really valuable paintings were protected by glass cages.

    そのため、本当に貴重な絵画はガラスの檻に守られていました。

  • Guess who was one of the guys responsible for making and fitting those cages?

    檻を作って取り付けたのは誰だと思う?

  • None other than Mr Perugia making cages wasn't exactly a money spinner.

    籠を作っているのは ペルージャ氏以外にはいないが 金儲けにはならなかった

  • And as the story goes, perusal lived hand to mouth.

    そして、物語の通り、熟読者は手と口を合わせて生きていた。

  • He disliked aspects of France as much as he disliked hunger.

    彼は飢えを嫌うのと同じくらいフランスの側面を嫌っていた。

  • But he also loved art.

    しかし、彼は芸術も愛していた。

  • Okay, so you're broke and you love art.

    金がなくて芸術が好きなんだな

  • What do you do?

    あなたは何をしているの?

  • You steal paintings?

    絵を盗むのか?

  • Of course he also hated the fact that Napoleon had looted the Mona Lisa from Italy.

    もちろんナポレオンがイタリアのモナリザを略奪したことも嫌っていた。

  • He was actually laboring under a misapprehension here because Napoleon didn't plunder the painting at all.

    実はナポレオンが絵を略奪したわけではないので、彼はここで勘違いをして労働していたのです。

  • Leonardo died while he was living in the court of King Friends, while the first the king kept the painting.

    レオナルドはキングフレンズの宮廷で生活している間に亡くなり、最初の王は絵画を保管していた。

  • So one day workers at the museum where a little shocked to see their most treasured painting gone, The cops turned up and said, OK, this must have been done by some kind of criminal mastermind.

    ある日、美術館で働いていた人たちは、自分たちの大切な絵が消えたのを見て少しショックを受けました。 警察が現れて、これはある種の犯罪の首謀者がやったに違いないと言いました。

  • He must have broken into the museum and hit.

    博物館に侵入して殴ったに違いない。

  • Then when the place was closed, he must have came out of hiding, taken the painting and left through the backdoor.

    そして、その場所が閉鎖された時、彼は隠れて出てきて、絵を取って裏口から出て行ったに違いありません。

  • Not true when peruse.

    Peruseの時はそうではありません。

  • A was no longer working at the loo if he did have a white smog, the same as other museum workers head.

    Aは他の館員の頭と同じように白いスモッグをしていたら、もうトイレの仕事はしていなかった。

  • So when he walked in the front door with him on on a Monday morning, no one thought much about it.

    だから、月曜日の朝に彼と一緒に玄関に入っても、誰もあまり考えていなかった。

  • He was one of them.

    彼はその中の一人だった。

  • He knew the Mona Lisa was hung in the part of the museum called the Salon Career.

    彼はモナリザがサロンキャリアと呼ばれる美術館の一部に吊るされていることを知っていた。

  • When that was empty, he lifted the painting along with the case off the wall.

    それが空になると、彼は壁からケースと一緒に絵を持ち上げた。

  • After that he crept to a staircase and started to take the painting out of the case.

    その後、階段に忍び寄り、ケースから絵を取り出し始めた。

  • He built it.

    彼が作ったんだ

  • After all, The funny thing was only minutes before all this happened.

    結局、おかしかったのは、こうなる数分前のことだった。

  • The lose maintenance director, a guy named PK, had looked at the painting and remarked to a co worker, They say it's worth a million and a half.

    負けた保守部長のPKという男が絵を見て、共同作業員に「100万円半の価値があると言われている」と言っていた。

  • Some folks said that he must have hidden the painting painted on wood under its smoke, but the fact is he was just too short to get away with that.

    木に塗った絵をその煙の下に隠したのではないかと言う人もいますが、実際には彼はあまりにも背が低すぎて、それで逃げられなかったのです。

  • What really happened is he took office smoke, wrapped it around the painting, put the bundle under his arm and headed for a back door.

    実際に何があったのかというと、彼はオフィスの煙草を取り、絵に巻きつけ、束を腕の下に入れて裏口に向かったのです。

  • Now there was a small problem.

    さて、ちょっとした問題がありました。

  • Peru's A had somehow gotten the key for that door, but when he arrived there, the key didn't work.

    ペルーのAさんは、どうにかしてそのドアの鍵を手に入れていたのですが、現地に着いてみると、鍵が効かなかったのです。

  • He'd used the same screwdriver.

    同じドライバーを使っていた

  • He used to get the painting off the frame to take off the door handle.

    枠から塗装を外してドアの取っ手を取るのに使っていたそうです。

  • That didn't help much.

    それはあまり役に立たなかった。

  • Then the Onley man, ever to see Peru via a plumber named Sylvia, turned up.

    それからオンリーの男はシルビアという配管工を経由してペルーに会いに行ったことがあります。

  • The thief told him he couldn't get through the door, so survey produced a pair of pliers and managed to open it mercy.

    泥棒は、彼がドアを通過することができなかったと彼に言ったので、調査はペンチのペアを生産し、それを慈悲を開くことができました。

  • Be cool, the plumber said.

    冷静になって、配管工が言っていた。

  • It was best I leave the door open so others might get through.

    ドアを開けたままにしておいた方が良かった 他の人が通るかもしれないから

  • To which Peruvian nodded his head.

    それにはペルー人も頷いた。

  • He was seen out in the street carrying an object, but no one thought anything of it.

    彼は通りで何かを運んでいるのを見られたが、誰も何も考えていなかった。

  • One person saw men throw something to the side that turned out to be the door knob.

    ある人は、男性が何かを横に投げるのを見て、それがドアノブであることが判明しました。

  • Okay, so that's not quite the crime of the century in terms of technical brilliance.

    技術的な輝きという点では世紀の犯罪とは言えないな

  • But he still managed to walk out of a place with one of the most valuable paintings in the world.

    それでも彼は世界で最も価値のある絵画の一つを持っている場所から出て行くことができました。

  • It was massive news, a British newspaper headline read.

    イギリスの新聞の見出しに書かれていたのは、大規模なニュースだった。

  • Paris has been startled, and the U.

    パリスはびっくりして、U.

  • S.

    S.

  • The Washington Post wrote to the art world was thrown into consternation.

    ワシントン・ポスト紙は、アートの世界は混乱の中に投げ込まれたと書いている。

  • The New York Times wrote that the theft had caused such a sensation that Parisians, for the time being, have for gotten the rumors of war.

    ニューヨーク・タイムズ紙は、盗難がパリの人々に戦争の噂を得たようなセンセーションを引き起こしていたと書いている。

  • War was about three years away at this point, by the way, the masterful Peruzzi kept the Mona Lisa in his apartment in Paris for a couple of years.

    この時点で戦争は3年ほど先のことで、ちなみに、名手ペルッツィはモナリザをパリのアパルトマンに数年間保管していた。

  • Meanwhile, the museum didn't fill the space on the wall.

    一方、館内は壁のスペースが埋まらなかった。

  • What's funny is the fact that people flocked to see the empty space anyway.

    何がおかしいって、とにかく空っぽの空間を見ようと人が群がってきたことだよ。

  • The crime became his popular as the painting, and the newspapers couldn't stop writing about it.

    この犯罪は絵に描いたように彼の人気者となり、新聞も記事にしないわけにはいかなかった。

  • This only served to make the Mona Lisa even more famous.

    これはモナリザの知名度をさらに高めることになった。

  • Investigators grew desperate, and France was very embarrassed by the ordeal.

    調査官は自暴自棄になり、フランスはその試練に非常に困惑していた。

  • For a time, the country even sealed its borders.

    一時は国境を封鎖したこともありました。

  • People carrying cases were stopped in the street.

    ケースを持った人たちが路上で止められていました。

  • Checkpoints were set up all around Paris, and cars, trucks and wagons were stopped and searched.

    パリのあちこちに検問所が設置され、車やトラック、ワゴン車が止められて捜索された。

  • The authorities feared that someone would try and take it out of the country, so people's luggage on trains and ships was routed through.

    当局は誰かが持ち出そうとするのを恐れて、電車や船に乗った人の荷物はスルーされた。

  • When the German Ocean liner Kaiser Wilhelm, the second, turned up in New York City, all its luggage was searched.

    ドイツの海洋定期船カイザー・ヴィルヘルム号がニューヨークで発見されたとき、荷物はすべて捜索された。

  • Why did they discover nothing?

    なぜ何も発見できなかったのか?

  • One of the enduring rumors was that some rich American art collector had committed the crime or at least commissioned it.

    不朽の噂の一つは、アメリカの金持ちのアートコレクターが犯罪を犯したか、少なくともそれを依頼したというものだった。

  • Folks whispered that it was the incredibly wealthy, art loving baking magnate J.

    信じられないほど裕福で芸術を愛するパン作りの大家Jがやったのではないかと噂されていました。

  • P.

    P.

  • Morgan Jr.

    モーガンJr.

  • Who was behind the theft.

    窃盗の背後にいたのは誰だ?

  • He denied the accusations and even said a million dollars and no questions asked if someone just handed it in.

    告発を否定し、100万ドルとまで言っていたし、誰かが渡しただけなら問答無用である。

  • That would have netted Peruzzi about twenty six million bucks in today's money, but he was having none of it.

    ペルーッツィは今の金で約2600万ドルを手に入れただろうが彼はそれに満足していなかった

  • The Brits were also blamed, of course, they'd only been fighting the French for the good part of a thousand years.

    もちろんイギリス人も責められていたが、彼らは千年の間フランスと戦っていただけだった。

  • But no, it wasn't them.

    しかし、いや、それは彼らではありませんでした。

  • Then, when a man named Joseph Jerry Perry walked into the Paris Journal and told the reporters that he was an art thief and he knew where the Mona Lisa Waas, the authorities suddenly started grinning like the woman in the painting.

    そして、ジョセフ・ジェリー・ペリーという男がパリ・ジャーナル紙の中に入ってきて、「自分は美術品泥棒で、モナリザ・ワアスの居場所を知っている」と記者団に話したところ、当局は突然、絵の中の女性のようにニヤニヤし始めた。

  • One thing led to another, and the gendarmes were knocking at the door of a young Pablo Picasso.

    あることがきっかけで、ゲンダルムたちが若いパブロ・ピカソの家のドアをノックしていた。

  • He actually was a thief, but he hadn't taken the painting.

    実は泥棒だったのですが、絵を持っていかれていませんでした。

  • The cops found two statues that both had stamps on them, saying, Property of theme use a deluge.

    警察は、テーマのプロパティを使用して洪水を使用して、と言って、両方がそれらにスタンプを持っていた2つの像を発見しました。

  • Weeks past months passed, and still the French authorities thought that the Spanish rat Picasso had taken the painting.

    数週間の過去数ヶ月が経過したが、それでもフランス当局は、スペインのネズミのピカソが絵を取ったと考えていた。

  • They had no idea that it was sitting in a trunk that belonged to some poor Italian handyman and decorator, a man that would shock the world, shocked the courts and win the hearts of his countrymen.

    彼らはそれが、世界に衝撃を与え、法廷に衝撃を与え、同胞の心を掴むであろう、イタリアの貧しい便利屋や装飾家のものであるトランクの中に鎮座しているとは知らなかった。

  • Down on his luck in without much cash, Peru, you finally decided that he would get rid of the painting and he got in touch with Alfredo.

    大金がなくて運が落ちたペルー、あなたはついに彼が絵を処分すると決め、彼はアルフレードと連絡を取り合った。

  • Jerry, the owner of an art gallery in Florence, will call him Jerry the Trader.

    フローレンスのアートギャラリーのオーナーであるジェリーは、彼をトレーダーのジェリーと呼ぶことになります。

  • At this point in time, the French authorities had pretty much accepted that they wouldn't be getting the painting back.

    この時点でフランス当局は絵を取り戻せないことをかなり受け入れていた。

  • Investigators had no leads and could Onley stare with frustration at an old door knob?

    捜査官は何の手がかりもなく、オンリーは古いドアノブに不満を持って見つめていたのか?

  • They've done everything, literally search the bags of France and beyond.

    彼らは、文字通りフランスのバッグを検索して、すべてを行ってきました。

  • They've shown hundreds of photos of past and present museum employees to that plumber, but he picked none of them out.

    その配管工に過去と現在の博物館職員の写真を何百枚も見せているが、どれも選ばれていない。

  • They'd worked with law enforcement in the U.

    彼らはアメリカの法執行機関で働いていました。

  • S.

    S.

  • Japan, the UK, Italy, Germany, Poland, Russia, Brazil, Argentina and Peru.

    日本、イギリス、イタリア、ドイツ、ポーランド、ロシア、ブラジル、アルゼンチン、ペルー。

  • Nothing, November nineteen thirteen, afraid of Jerry wakes up in the morning and collects his mail.

    何もない、11月19日13日、ジェリーを恐れて朝起きて、彼のメールを収集します。

  • There's a letter signed off by someone named Lenard.

    レナードという名前の人が署名した手紙がある

  • The letter states that he is in possession of the great Mona Lisa.

    手紙には、偉大なるモナリザを所有していることが記されている。

  • It says that he wants to return the painting to its native country, Italy.

    絵を母国イタリアに返したいと書いてある。

  • And while he won't ask for a specific payment being poor and all, he would be grateful if he were compensated for bringing the Mona Lisa home.

    貧乏だから具体的な支払いは要求しないが、モナリザを家に持って帰った時の補償があれば感謝するだろう。

  • The return address was a post office box in Paris.

    返却先はパリの私書箱でした。

  • Jerry didn't believe a word of it.

    ジェリーはその言葉を信じていませんでした。

  • of course, but he still went to the director of Florence's, who fits a gallery and told him about the letter.

    もちろんですが、それでも彼はギャラリーにフィットしたフィレンツェのディレクターのところに行き、手紙のことを話しました。

  • His name was Giovanni Poggi.

    彼の名前はジョバンニ・ポッジ。

  • Poggi had a collection of photos of the Mona Lisa, and some of them showed markings on the back of the panel.

    ポッジはモナリザの写真集を持っていたが、中にはパネルの裏にマーキングがあるものもあった。

  • If the writer of the letter was telling the truth, the painting he had would have those markings.

    手紙の作者が真実を言っていたとしたら、彼が持っていた絵にはそのような印があったはずです。

  • Jerry always thought he was being led on a merry dance, trolled by some dude with too much time on his hands.

    ジェリーはいつも陽気なダンスに導かれていると思っていました。時間を持て余している男に荒らされていました。

  • But then some months later, he received another letter in that the writer said he was in Italy.

    しかし、その後数ヶ月後、彼は作家が彼がイタリアにいたと言ったことで別の手紙を受け取った。

  • And would Jerry like to see the world's most famous painting?

    そして、ジェリーは世界で最も有名な絵画を見てみたいと思いますか?

  • Soon, the mysterious lanyard was in his gallery office.

    やがて、謎のストラップが彼のギャラリーオフィスにあった。

  • He wore a fastidiously groomed mustache, a smart suit, and he described the Mona Lisa and those markings on the back.

    きちんと手入れされた口ひげを生やし、スマートなスーツを着て、モナリザと背中のマークについて説明していました。

  • The man said he only wanted a reward, not the millions, that the painting was worth five hundred thousand lire, said Leonardo.

    男は、絵が五十万リラの価値があるとレオナルドは言った、数百万ではなく、報酬が欲しいだけだと言った。

  • That's about two point six million in today's cash.

    今日の現金で2ポイント600万くらいですね。

  • But let's remember that the painting was actually worth closer to one hundred thirty million in today's money.

    しかし、この絵は現在のお金では1億3000万に近い価値があったことを覚えておきましょう。

  • Jerry held out his hand and said That's fine.

    ジェリーは手を差し出して言った。

  • That's not too high.

    それも高くはない。

  • The next day, Mr Perugia, masquerading as Leonardo, took Jerry and Poggi to the Hotel Tripoli, Italian in Florence.

    翌日、レオナルドに扮したペルージャ氏は、ジェリーとポッジをフィレンツェのイタリアンホテルトリポリに連れて行った。

  • He took them to a room on the third floor, closed the curtains and pulled a white wooden trunk from under the bed.

    彼は三階の部屋に連れて行き、カーテンを閉めてベッドの下から白い木のトランクを取り出した。

  • It was time.

    時間でした。

  • It was what the world was waiting for.

    それは世界が待っていたものだった。

  • Fake Leonardi opened the trunk.

    偽レオナルディがトランクを開けた。

  • Jerry was aghast, shocked when what he saw were in his own words.

    ジェリーは愕然とし、見たものが自分の言葉であったことにショックを受けた。

  • Wretched objects, broken shoes and mangled hat, a pair of pliers, plastering tools, a smoke, some white paint brushes and even a mandolin.

    惨めなもの、壊れた靴とつぶれた帽子、ペンチ、左官道具、煙草、白いペンキの筆、マンドリンまでも。

  • Damn lanyard wasn't done, though.

    糞ヒモは終わってなかったけどな

  • He emptied the trunk and then opened a secret compartment.

    彼はトランクを空にして、秘密のコンパートメントを開けた。

  • Jerry's eyes sparkled.

    ジェリーの目が輝いていた。

  • He almost wet in front of him.

    目の前で濡れそうになった。

  • Was the Mona Lisa marvelously preserved.

    モナリザは見事に保存されていました。

  • He and Poggi meticulously checked it for its authenticity.

    彼とポッジはそれが本物であるかどうかを入念にチェックした。

  • It was the real deal, No doubt about it.

    本物だったんだ 間違いない

  • The three men almost didn't make it out of the hotel when the concierge pulled him up and asked him what they were carrying.

    コンシェルジュに引っ張られて何を持っているのか聞かれて、3人はホテルから出られなくなりそうになった。

  • Were they stealing artwork from the hotel?

    ホテルから美術品を盗んだのか?

  • They were OK, and they showed him credential stating that they were art gallery directors.

    彼らは問題なく、ギャラリーのディレクターであることを証明する書類を彼に見せた。

  • The painting was kept at Poaches Gallery, and Peruzzi, a still pretending to be Leonardo, was told that he'd have to contact the Italian government to get his reward.

    絵はポアッシュギャラリーに保管されており、レオナルドになりすましたままのペルーツィは、イタリア政府に連絡しないと報酬がもらえないと言われていた。

  • He believed that the two guys were honest and trustworthy.

    彼は、この二人が誠実で信頼できると信じていた。

  • His shook his hand and told him he was a true patriot.

    彼は握手をして、真の愛国者だと言った。

  • An hour or two later, when perusal was lying on his hotel bed, wondering how he'd spend his windfall, there was a knock on the door.

    1時間か2時間後、ペルサールがホテルのベッドに横たわっていた時に、ドアをノックする音がした。

  • It was the cops.

    警察の仕業だ

  • Or, as they say in Italy, the Carbonetti.

    イタリアではカルボネッティと呼ばれています。

  • The love was informed, but the tail didn't ring true.

    愛は知らされていたが、尻尾は本当の意味で鳴らなかった。

  • Some wretch just walked out with the Mona Lisa.

    モナリザを持って出て行った奴がいる。

  • No way.

    ありえない

  • The next day they issued a statement to the media.

    翌日、彼らはメディアに声明を発表した。

  • The curator of the loop wished to say nothing until they've seen the painting.

    ループの学芸員は、絵を見るまで何も言わないことを望んでいた。

  • After some diplomatic chit chat on the phone, it was agreed that the Mona Lisa would be returned to the loo.

    電話での外交的な世間話の後、モナリザをトイレに戻すことに合意した。

  • Although the masterpieces dear to all Italians is one of the best productions of the genius of their race, we will willingly return it to its foster country, announced the Italian government on January fourth, nineteen fourteen.

    すべてのイタリア人に愛されている傑作は、彼らのレースの天才の最高の作品の一つであるが、我々は喜んでその養育国にそれを返すだろう、1月4日、1914年にイタリア政府を発表しました。

  • It was back in the salon carry the poor patriot was behind bars.

    貧乏な愛国者が刑務所に入っていたのは、サロンキャリーに戻っていた。

  • Miserable and angry, he received another metaphorical kick in the teeth when he heard that Jerry collected thousands of dollars in reward money and was bestowed with France's Legion of Honor.

    惨めで怒りに満ちた彼は、ジェリーが報奨金で数千ドルを集め、フランスのレジオンドヌール勲章を授与されたことを聞いたときに、別の比喩的なキックを歯に受けた。

  • How could this have happened to him?

    どうしてこんなことになってしまったのでしょうか?

  • Prison guards reported that he sat all day in a state of deep depression, occasionally weeping at the cold stone walls.

    刑務官の報告によると、彼は一日中座っていて、深い憂鬱な状態で、時折冷たい石の壁に泣いていたという。

  • Little did he know that he was a hero, not just in Italy, but around the world.

    彼はイタリアだけでなく、世界中の英雄であることを知らなかった。

  • He might have been a villain of sorts, but oh boy, did he inspire people, especially the poor, age thirty two.

    彼はある種の悪役だったかもしれないが、彼は人々を鼓舞した、特に貧しい人々を、32歳の時に。

  • Standing in court, he told all in attendance, including the journalists from all over the world, how he had done it, the judge then asked.

    裁判官は法廷に立ち、世界中のジャーナリストを含む出席者全員に自分がどうやってやったのかを話した後、質問した。

  • But why?

    でも、なぜ?

  • Why did you do such a thing?

    どうしてそんなことをしたの?

  • To which Peruzzi replied.

    ペルーツィは答えた。

  • All those Italian paintings in the loo, they're all stolen.

    トイレにあるイタリアの絵は全部盗まれてるんだよな

  • He was merely bringing one home.

    彼は一人を家に連れて帰っただけだ

  • National museums what they are, really.

    国立博物館とは何か、本当に。

  • They're just the loot Stashes of criminal enterprises, he said he considered taking paintings by Raphael, Correggio, Giorgianni but the Mona Lisa.

    彼らはただの犯罪企業の略奪品だ 彼はラファエロの絵画を取ることを考えたと言った コレッジョ ジョルジアンニだが モナリザは違う

  • It was small enough to hide under a smoke.

    煙の下に隠れるくらいの小ささでした。

  • It wasn't about the value, he said, and added I never acted with that in mind.

    それは価値の話ではない、と彼は言い、私はそんなことを考えて行動したことはない、と付け加えた。

  • I only desired that the masterpiece would be put back in its place of honor.

    傑作が名誉ある場所に戻されることだけを願っていました。

  • Here in Florence, the judge fired back.

    ここフィレンツェでは判事が反撃してきた

  • But didn't you try and sell it to the English?

    でもイギリス人に売ろうとしたんじゃないの?

  • Peruzzi denied it, but the fact is, he had earlier said in a statement that he tried to fence it to an Englishman.

    ペルーツィは否定したが、事実は先に声明で「イギリス人に柵をかけようとした」と発言していた。

  • Whether he did or didn't remains a mystery.

    彼がやったのかやらなかったのかは謎のままです。

  • A lot of what he said is confusing because he contradicted himself a bunch of times.

    彼が言ったことの多くは、彼自身が何度も矛盾していて混乱しています。

  • Did he act alone in the theft was a part of a global conspiracy of thieves and scammers who intended to steal the Mona Lisa so they could make and sell forgeries and sell them to the wealthy.

    彼が単独で行動したのは、モナリザを盗むことを目的とした泥棒や詐欺師の世界的な陰謀の一部だったので、偽造品を作って富裕層に売ることができたのです。

  • Art collectors who knows perusal was sentenced to one year in fifteen days.

    ぺルサールを知る美術収集家は、15日に1年の実刑判決を受けた。

  • When asked by a reporter how he felt about that, he replied, It could have been worse.

    記者にそのことについてどう感じているかと聞かれると、「もっとひどいことになっていたかもしれない」と答えた。

  • He was out in seven months.

    彼は7ヶ月で退院した

  • Crowds of cheering people were there to greet him.

    応援に駆けつけた人だかりができていた。

  • He was front page news for a while anyway.

    彼は一面のニュースになっていた

  • The Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria had just been assassinated.

    オーストリアの大公フランツ・フェルディナントが暗殺されたばかりだった。

  • World War one was just around the corner.

    第一次世界大戦はすぐそこまで来ていた。

  • Human blood would cover the canvas of a continent old, present and budding empires Thieves of land in life would relegate proved a small crime