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  • One two three listen

  • (upbeat music)

  • - Welcome to Real Deal.

  • Real Deal.

  • Real Deal.

  • Real Deal.

  • Real Deal.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Joining me today are The Happy Pear.

  • Welcome to Real Deal.

  • (upbeat music)

  • (applauding and cheering)

  • Welcome to Real Deal,

  • I am Brian Rose,

  • and we are live here

  • at London Real World Headquarters

  • to talk about culture and theatre.

  • Now hang with me for just a second here,

  • because you might think

  • this might not apply to you,

  • but it does, because I really wanna talk about

  • how we can put culture first,

  • and how we can really ensure

  • that London and your city

  • really has a world beating theatre industry.

  • I wanna talk about all the things

  • I've learned in the past week,

  • to really understand the part

  • that theatre and culture plays in our economy.

  • It really is a massive part of any local economy.

  • And I wanna talk about it today,

  • because if we can get our theatres back to work,

  • we can get our economy back on track.

  • And that goes to any city you live in,

  • the culture is such a big, important part of it.

  • And I'm gonna share with you

  • some great knowledge I learned this week.

  • I got to sit down with John Morgan,

  • who's the director

  • of the Theatres Trust here in Britain,

  • who really looks after these buildings,

  • and these cultural venues

  • that really change the game

  • when it comes to economic situation.

  • So I wanna talk about that today.

  • Again, this really applies to you and your city.

  • But I wanna kick it off by finding

  • a little bit about you.

  • Tell me, what is your single biggest economic challenge

  • right now, personally?

  • Whether you're an employee,

  • a contractor, an entrepreneur.

  • Tell me, what is your single biggest challenge?

  • I really wanna hear about that.

  • Second, I wanna know, do you think

  • culture and theatre

  • are important right now, period?

  • Do you think they are important things

  • for us to think about,

  • or should we be locked down

  • worried about other things?

  • Our health or making money, or do you think

  • culture and theatre are important?

  • And finally, I wanna ask you,

  • do you think we need better leadership,

  • and how do we get there?

  • So those are my big questions.

  • Again, type them wherever you're at.

  • However you're watching me now,

  • on Facebook, on YouTube, on Instagram,

  • I'd love to hear your comments,

  • because this is about us all coming together,

  • and getting the best ideas,

  • to help our communities,

  • to help our economies,

  • and help get our cities back on track.

  • That's what I'm really looking to do here.

  • And the problem is is that our governments,

  • they don't always get it.

  • Sometimes they have their own priorities.

  • Sometimes they have their own agendas.

  • And they're not really thinking

  • about the business owners,

  • the theatre goers, the creatives,

  • and that's really important.

  • And I think by having these conversations,

  • and by you even sharing these videos,

  • we can literally see policy change happen

  • within days or weeks,

  • and really change people's economic health,

  • mental health, physical health, it's all related.

  • And I've got some great points

  • about that today.

  • So again, this is a third in the series

  • of me trying to go out in the city of London

  • and speak to people.

  • I've spoken to entrepreneurs, business owners,

  • taxi drivers, community leaders,

  • and now people in the theatre and arts industry,

  • to try to find out what can we do

  • to get things back on track?

  • It's so important,

  • and it's really crucial

  • that we get this thing sorted.

  • And I just wanna talk about that today.

  • But first, I wanna let you know

  • that I am no stranger to going out there

  • and hanging out with some of these cultural venues,

  • because it's a big part of mine interaction.

  • And this is me with my son Kaden,

  • about two weeks ago.

  • And we were supposed to go

  • to the Natural History Museum,

  • but dad screwed up and couldn't get tickets.

  • So I promised him dinosaur bones,

  • and I gave him a lunar lander from the moon.

  • So we went to the Science Museum,

  • and we were showing him around.

  • And I can't emphasise how important this stuff is.

  • You know, for him to have an experience

  • that's not on a screen,

  • watching a cartoon or watching a Netflix movie,

  • to be able to go with his dad,

  • and ask questions.

  • He took my phone,

  • he was taking pictures of all the space vehicles,

  • and the science stuff.

  • You know, it's an important moment.

  • I remember the times I went to museums.

  • I remember the times I went out and saw plays,

  • and ballets and things like that,

  • and they were a big part of me growing up.

  • And actually this Sunday,

  • I will be taking Kaden and his brother Damon

  • to see the dinosaur bones.

  • And the truth is,

  • is that Kaden everyday when I come home says,

  • dinosaur bones, dinosaur bones,

  • because I never showed him the dinosaur bones.

  • So we're going on Sunday

  • to the Natural History Museum.

  • So I'll see you there,

  • if you're there in the afternoon.

  • And it's important to have culture in your city,

  • and I'm a big fan of supporting it,

  • and getting out there and engaging with it.

  • And so, again, for me,

  • it seems to be a really important part

  • of what the city is.

  • And it was funny,

  • because I was looking through some old history

  • here in England.

  • And I came upon this incredible quote

  • from Winston Churchill.

  • And it was during the time of a World War Two,

  • and the Blitz, and someone asked

  • Churchill the question,

  • should we cut funding in the arts,

  • in order to put all of our money

  • into the war effort?

  • And Churchill, you know,

  • in his great character and way

  • of putting back remarks, he said this,

  • and I think this is really powerful.

  • He said, then what would we be fighting for?

  • That's what he said.

  • When asked to cut that budget,

  • and put it into the military,

  • then what would we be fighting for?

  • And that's just such a great point.

  • You know, the culture is what makes

  • our city, our city.

  • Otherwise they all become the same thing

  • because they all have the same Starbucks,

  • they all play the same sports in the same venues.

  • They all have the same chain restaurants,

  • and there's no real culture.

  • And I don't know about you,

  • but I've been to cities

  • where there's no culture,

  • and I don't like it.

  • I don't wanna go back.

  • I wanna see the locals doing what they do.

  • I wanna see arts, I wanna see theatre,

  • I wanna see museums, I wanna see marketplaces.

  • I wanna see small businesses

  • doing what they do.

  • That's why people wanna come to see London.

  • And that's why people from all over Britain

  • wanna come into London,

  • because of the great culture we have.

  • I've been talking last couple of weeks

  • about the small businesses

  • that bring us great culture.

  • Whether it's a tailor who makes my suits,

  • or someone who makes a bespoke cup

  • of coffee for you,

  • that's what really gives the city its life,

  • and that's what builds economies.

  • And that's the way out

  • of this current mess that we're in,

  • in my opinion.

  • And so I love that Churchill quote,

  • I hope it resonated with you.

  • And I went deeper,

  • and started looking at the numbers.

  • And these numbers are gonna absolutely

  • blow you away, because they shocked me.

  • Because I thought theatre and culture

  • was just something nice to have, right?

  • It was just like,

  • oh, I'd like to go to a museum,

  • but I could stay home and watch Netflix.

  • I didn't think it was actually a major part

  • of the economy.

  • But when I looked into it,

  • the numbers were absolutely shocking.

  • 2.7 billion pounds is added to the UK economy

  • because of arts and culture, 2.7 billion pounds,

  • incredible number there.

  • 290,000 people are employed in this sector,

  • or sectors related to the theatre and the arts.

  • 290,000 people.

  • Massive, massive, it's a massive industry.

  • Over 70% of those jobs are at risk right now

  • because of the pandemic and lockdown,

  • and the lack of science based decision making,

  • which I wanna talk about shortly.

  • And finally, that is double the 1.1 billion pounds

  • spent on sports visitors,

  • which we would think that football and rugby

  • and all these other things

  • would be much more important.

  • Actually, it's significantly smaller,

  • which means we need to start paying attention

  • to these things

  • 'cause this is what's gonna get our economy

  • back on track.

  • And so I was lucky to be able to sit down this week

  • with John Morgan,

  • who is the director of the Theatres Trust

  • here in Britain,

  • who really looks after these cultural venues,

  • and has his finger on the pulse

  • of what's happening in the arts community.

  • And we talked about what's happening,

  • and what their struggles are.

  • And so I'd love to play for you a short video

  • of me speaking with John Morgan

  • about this incredible problem we have

  • of trying to solve the issue

  • with our arts and culture.

  • Here he is.

  • Look, it's great to have you here.

  • I've spent the last couple of weeks

  • getting out there and trying to talk to people,

  • to find out how we can get London back to work.

  • You know, as an entrepreneur,

  • I know it's a crucial part of the economy,

  • and also people's mental health,

  • and physical health.

  • And you know, most of the people out there

  • are complaining of a few things.