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  • -It's "Star Wars" day. It's May the 4th.

  • Are you excited about May the 4th, Ricky?

  • -It's a date, isn't it?

  • I'm -- I'm always excited.

  • I'm excited about every day.

  • Every -- I celebrate every day.

  • -[ Laughs ]

  • -I don't know how long I've got left.

  • So it's like, every day becomes a bigger percentage

  • of my time left on Earth.

  • So I celebrate it more and more. -[ Laughs ]

  • -You -- I want to congratulate you

  • on the second season of "After Life."

  • This is a fantastic show.

  • It's really funny, but it's also about -- you know,

  • it's about things like depression, addiction,

  • just in general, mortality.

  • Is this always -- I mean, obviously, you know,

  • I think from watching your comedy,

  • people have always thought these are interesting to you.

  • Was it an undertaking to sort of write about it?

  • -I guess I've always been attracted to blue subjects

  • as a comedian, particularly standup.

  • I like to do that because I want to take the audience

  • to a sort of scary place. So I think that's fun for me.

  • I think comedians in general sort of like doing that.

  • We like being scary to some extent.

  • And comedy is a relief, isn't it?

  • It's like, I want to take you to a scary forest

  • and out through the other side and it's all sunny and lovely.

  • Everything I've done has been vaguely existential.

  • You know, "The Office" is about being 40

  • and making the most of your life.

  • "Derek" was about the end of your life.

  • And this is explicitly -- it's about, you know,

  • losing the love of your life.

  • And I suppose ask the big question,

  • if you lose everything, is life still worth living?

  • And that was the sort of -- the jumping-off point, really.

  • A man who loses everything,

  • he's gonna kill himself, but the dog's hungry.

  • He doesn't. He decides to punish the world.

  • So that's the high concept of it.

  • And then I think it was because after the first season,

  • I'd never had a reaction like it.

  • People writing me letters, coming up to me in the street

  • and saying, "Oh, I lost my brother three weeks

  • before I watched it," or "I lost my mum last year."

  • And they really identify with it.

  • I liked the fact there was this show about grief and depression.

  • And they, you know, they -- they like the character,

  • they identify with the character.

  • So I thought then I would have to treat it with,

  • you know, a lot of respect.

  • That's why he couldn't just get better.

  • So he's going through the seven stages of grief.

  • And so we're watching his journey.

  • And he's trying to be well.

  • And he's trying to be a good person,

  • but he's really hurt.

  • And that sounds really dark and depressing,

  • but actually it's quite uplifting because, you know,

  • he's got a nice bunch of friends and family, but he's wounded.

  • And the comedy comes from that, as well,

  • because he says and does what he wants now.

  • He thinks he's got nothing to lose.

  • So I suppose we sort of live vicariously through his candor.

  • He's so free. And he's only burdened by conscience

  • and doing the right thing.

  • So that's -- that's the conflict.

  • He's a nice man who's lost everything.

  • And he's angry and hurt.

  • And what better subject for comedy?

  • -I -- One of the most interesting comparisons

  • for me is because he presents

  • as someone who doesn't need anything,

  • it's really funny to watch you play him because I do consider

  • David Brent to be the person

  • who presents as the most needy person in the world.

  • And so it is a really interesting --

  • just to compare the two side by side

  • is obviously a very different performance style.

  • -Well that's it, because David Brent,

  • the big joke there is his blind spot.

  • We're laughing at the difference between how he sees himself

  • and how we see him, you know?

  • He's a buffoon who wants to be taken seriously.

  • And that's the staple of the comedy.

  • It's an ordinary guy trying to do something

  • they're not equipped to do, and that's what's funny.

  • I suppose Tony in "After Life" is sort of the opposite.

  • He's very self-aware.

  • He knows what's going on, and he hates it.

  • And that's sort of interesting, too.

  • But I suppose -- I suppose you're right.

  • The big -- Where they're similar and why we're all similar

  • is that deep down, we all want to be loved.

  • And we all need a hug whether we admit it or not.

  • And I think that it's breaking this -- he tried to turn himself

  • into a psychopath so he wouldn't feel pain,

  • but he can't because he's not a psychopath.

  • So that's the thing they've got in common, really.

  • As I say, everyone has.

  • We all want to be loved, deep down -- even you.

  • -You -- Another thing consistent I've always found about

  • your shows is there's always like one or two people

  • in the casting that I feel like if it wasn't for you

  • finding them, would never have been on television.

  • And it strikes me that you have gone out of your way

  • to cast people that looked and behaved like regular people.

  • -Exactly. And it's so funny,

  • because I sometimes get comments, like,

  • what freaks, what a freak show on telly.

  • Well, no, they're only a freak show compared to people

  • like Brad Pitt and, you know, Tom Cruise.

  • But that's what most English people look like.

  • They look more like the people I cast.

  • -[ Laughs ] -That's normal here.

  • [ Laughs ] We are a freak show.

  • -Yes. -So thanks for bringing that up.

  • -It's an antidote to "Downton Abbey."

  • Anyone who's watching "Downton Abbey" thinking

  • that's how England is, just check out "After Life."

  • -Yeah. -And you might --

  • This might be the first show

  • that you will do a third season of.

  • Are you actively considering that?

  • -Yeah. Again, you know, I even did the first season

  • like it could end there

  • in case I got knocked over by a bus,

  • but it went down really well.

  • It was the most-watched British sitcom in the world, apparently.

  • I think that's a reflection of how big Netflix are, though.

  • I can't take credit for that, really, but people enjoyed it,

  • so I did a second. Because I really --

  • I loved writing it. I loved directing it.

  • I loved the cast.

  • So I think for the first time ever,

  • I might do a third, but it's got to go down the storm again.

  • I don't want to do an unwanted encore

  • just because I can get paid.

  • But it seems to be -- It seems to be on the cards.

  • If things carry on like they are,

  • yeah, probably a third season.

  • -Well, that's really exciting. Congrats on season two.

  • It's always wonderful to see you.

  • Thanks for being here, Ricky. -Cheers.

-It's "Star Wars" day. It's May the 4th.

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リッキー・ガーヴェイスは、彼のコメディで観客を怖がらせたいと考えている (Ricky Gervais Wants to Scare Audiences with His Comedy)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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