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  • Let's not forget last night.

  • Yeah, way in 1993 I thought I could fly.

  • What was the reason for this self belief?

  • This confidence.

  • It was because I was living the dream and not just any dream, either.

  • I was living my very specific dream of being a singer songwriter, a creative artist, and that was all I'd ever wanted to do since I was a kid jumping around our living room with a fake cardboard electric guitar mining my band.

  • Things have stunning.

  • Would had a hit song, the song that is currently going through the speaker.

  • There we had a hit song on the radio, and we're launching our debut album, The Yearning at Melbourne's Corner Hotel, one of the biggest venues in Melbourne.

  • And it was filled with people eagerly awaiting this, the most important show of our career to date, and I felt awesome.

  • I'd taken this leap of faith onto a stepping stone in the middle of the river, and it was working.

  • As I went to walk on stage.

  • I had an idea, an idea I now recognizes having questionable worth going.

  • Wouldn't it be really, really cool if I jumped into the sky like a total rock star and landed on the first beat the shocker.

  • As I walked on stage, I still thought this was a great idea.

  • In fact, as I flew into the air, I felt so great, I felt that I could have flown out into the stratosphere.

  • I reached the zenith of my leap and began, Come back down and the lights exploded into life, and I was about to hit the stage and smash out the show Only when I hit the stage I didn't stop the stage.

  • I fell straight through the stage and I was left with this stage up to my armpits, and I was looking at the audience and they were looking at me, shocked and confused, and I was looking at them, shocked and confused, and they were right here.

  • The band, who was hoping to launch into a fiery folk rock song, had to play a little bit of cocktail jazz in the background while the roadies came and pulled me and my tragically out of tune guitar from the wreckage.

  • So a lot of my the band's good fortune at this point could have Bean put down to our hit single Happy Birthday, Helen, I just have to say on a side note.

  • Helen has just proven herself to be a very worthy subject of hypnosis.

  • I just have to say, But anyway, we'd release this song in 1992 and watch that become a radio hit and then a genuine, bona fide chart Top 10 hit.

  • And it was life changing for the band and for me, as the band's songwriter, I'd written a song for my wife's 22nd birthday.

  • We'd just come back from a trip to India, which was very confronting and reflective and was struggling to readjust to life in the comfortable Mobin suburbs.

  • I'll write a lyric filled with air filled with memories of our 1st 3 years together, and I put them to an upbeat folk rock song.

  • It was written entirely for an audience of one, and I'm happy to say that Helen enjoyed her birthday present.

  • So that was that, I thought.

  • But a couple of months later, I played the song to Mike Yellen, the bass player in things of stone and Wood, and he went, huh, That's a good song.

  • We should do that song in the band and I thank him.

  • Not for the first time I've last 29 years because it seemed that observation was right.

  • But I've always been but surprised by the reaction to the song.

  • Why hit such a nerve?

  • Because it's so insular.

  • It wasn't is a two person memory catalog.

  • I know what the lyrics mean.

  • Helen eyes with the lyrics Maine, but nobody else does.

  • But I think it hit a nerve for two reasons.

  • I think people heard the truth of the love in the song, The authenticity of the love.

  • It has aesthetic purity of heart.

  • It was not written to please any specific demographic.

  • It wasn't written to please any radio programmer.

  • It certainly wasn't written to cynically cell records.

  • And I think the, uh, second reason that people responded so well to this song was that they translated it into their own experience.

  • I mean, they didn't know what it was like to drive along Milburn's muddy river.

  • The Yarra.

  • They didn't know what it was like to kiss on that bridge that fell down.

  • I mean, what bridge are you talking about, mate?

  • But I think they translated those lyrics into their own lives.

  • I believe the audience and the song had a conversation they shared.

  • Arguably, they collaborated in the composition of meaning.

  • Now, sadly, they can't all be heavy Birthday Helen's are.

  • The band enjoyed further successes.

  • We toured around the UK, Europe, Canada and every gig and festival Bigon Small in Australia.

  • But we never enjoyed the same level of success again.

  • And I'm sure I'm not the only musician who has to reconcile themselves to the fact that a 26 My Korea in that area had pate.

  • After the band stopped touring, I continued on in my creative life a singer, songwriter and musician, a record producer, small steps to small stones, sometimes forward, sometimes backwards.

  • But I was happy, even if I was less likely to be asked for an autograph.

  • But by the time of 40 something changed.

  • I just written an album called Lost Marie, and it was entirely filled with story songs fiction.

  • I've removed myself entirely from the album, and that was telling me something that was telling me that I was sick of myself.

  • I was at the end of the road, not all roads, but that specific road.

  • I just didn't want to do it anymore.

  • I didn't want to be away from my family every weekend.

  • I don't want the financial in insecurity of it all.

  • I still had lots of nice geeks, but when I had a bad one, I didn't feel like a folk rock warrior fighting the good fight.

  • The bad Biggs would hurt me deeply now.

  • So I I stopped touring and I thought, t, what do I do now?

  • What do I know how to do?

  • What did I know how to do before music so took over my life?

  • And then I remembered Well, I know how to be a university student.

  • I'm taking about six years to complete a four year English literature degree.

  • Feel that had plenty of practice.

  • That was pretty good at it.

  • So I thought, I'll go back to university.

  • And so I enrolled in a master's of arts administration with the express purpose of leaving the creative life behind.

  • I wanted a life more regular, but it was only a matter of time before all arrows began pointing back to that very life I was trying to leave behind.

  • After I left University with my degree in hand.

  • I started teaching music, business, song, writing, record production, popular culture, and I had a full time job in the academy, something I never expected that have.

  • And then I took a very significant leap onto a very important stepping Stein, one from which I hoped I would understand creativity beyond the mere practice of us.

  • It's part of the process I was working on a new album with My band is swamped Andy's, and I hope to research the hypothesis that I was totally amazing.

  • I was hoping to be out of proving a bulletproof way that I was a stunning example off the G word.

  • That word that gets banded around so much in creative circles, a genius for all my life.

  • I believe these very romantic ideas that artistry was somehow some special gift bestowed upon the special few at birth.

  • So I didn't want to look too closely at my creativity, lest it would disappear like some sort of character from a fairy tale.

  • Now I'm sure you've all noticed at this point just took me a while to get there.

  • That's such thinking is utter nonsense.

  • It has no place in serious, postgraduate, critically self reflective study.

  • It just took me a long time to get there.

  • But I noticed when I started studying that all the riders in academics were drilling down on these ideas, these romantic ideas of creativity, and they were finding them unsatisfactory.

  • And I didn't like what I was finding.

  • I didn't like anything that made me seem less brilliant to myself.

  • But the more I looked at it, the more I found things like the systems model of creativity, a model where there's a relationship between the writer, the person and the field, as represented by expert gatekeepers and by the broader domain.

  • And in this systems model of creativity, the person invents something novel that is discovered, nurtured and developed by an expert gatekeeper and then launched out into the broader domain.

  • Well, I did not like that at all.

  • There is nothing romantic about a system and novelty inventing something novel.

  • In this context, novelty was like a swear word to me.

  • I was a serious artist.

  • I brought serious songs, but I couldn't help but notice as much as I might have liked it that the systems model could be applied to me, say, for example, the song we talked about Happy Birthday, Helen.

  • Authentic Love is many things in a popular song, but it must certainly is not novel, but a wailing harmonica is in my band.

  • Things that stunning would were a high energy, melodic and harmonically appealing band, but we're also broadcasting a novel suite of acoustic instruments.

  • That novelty was embraced by the expert gatekeeper, a producer and manager, James Black, already an established musician in Australia, and in turn we were signed by that mega gatekeeper, Sony Records, and were released at into the broader domain with vast commercial support, where were welcomed with open arms.

  • Now I must have locked it much that the systems model could be applied to May and our experiences.

  • But I felt better when I realized what it could be applied to me.

  • It could be applied to anybody, for example, my favorite ever creative artists, the Beatles, that invented a novel new approach to popular music where they wrote their own songs, which was unusual for poor performance at the time that Stella, three part harmonies but no established lead singer and with a seemingly boundless Joie de V, they re energized the fundamental, youthful spirit of rock and roll.

  • They were discovered by the expert gatekeeper producer George Martin.

  • He nurtured and developed that work.

  • And then there are broadcast out into the broader domain, right?

  • Am I?

  • And they were loved and understood in a manner that no one has enjoyed before or since.

  • Once I finished my PhD studies, I didn't stop writing songs.

  • I didn't lose any magical merger because magical Mojo is not a real thing to lose.

  • I still loved popular songs I loved as much as I ever had.

  • Maybe even more.

  • I love the simple blend of lyric and melody and harmony and rhythm that could be so moving.

  • Put simply, my love for pop music had grown up.

  • It's attributed to Thomas Edison.

  • That genius is 1% inspiration.

  • 99% perspiration are much more likely to appreciate the 99% of hard work or perspiration now that I'm no longer enamored with the vainglorious delusions of the moment of inspiration.

  • But I can see how this must look to you.

  • It must look like I've given up in some way that I've settled for some diminished notion of creativity, but that's not true at all.

  • I've discovered something that I find to be even more beautiful and more egalitarian than any of the room.

  • Man.

  • Tick, Nonsense.

  • I had come to the project with every one of you.

  • Every one of us is absolutely unique.

  • Nobody will ever share the identical perspective on life and the human condition.

  • As you do.

  • I've discovered that if you can find a way to broadcast that unique perspective in a manner that is discovered and embraced and nurtured by an expert gatekeeper, you two might enjoy the immense satisfaction.

  • Having your deepest emotions understood and enjoyed by a broad audience.

  • My PhD taught me to question the very existence of genius.

  • But you're such a thing does exist.

  • Then you are role.

  • We are role creative geniuses waiting to happen.

  • Thank you.

Let's not forget last night.

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クリエイティブライフ|グレッグ・アーノルド|TEDxHSG (A Creative Life | Greg Arnold | TEDxHSG)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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