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  • It's David Happened Filmmaker with another clip from 1979.

  • You know about Social Security may be gone.

  • It or your parents are on it.

  • The grandparent's I'm on Social Security.

  • So security is unbelievably personal, right?

  • It's like I got missing a finger.

  • I have heart disease.

  • I have, ah, skin problem.

  • Whatever it is, the Social Security Office is dealing with you as a person.

  • Well, back when they started in 1935 it was just Social Security.

  • And by the 19 fifties they were starting to personalize using computers, they used magnetic tape.

  • They used microfilm.

  • I don't know how many of you have seen that and they use something which I think most of you haven't seen.

  • The punch card, the punch card at all these little boxes in it.

  • And that allowed for personalization of information.

  • Now the punch card had something written on it.

  • Every single one and everybody old enough will remember.

  • Don't fold spindle or mutilate.

  • Okay, Don't fold.

  • Got it?

  • Don't merely got it.

  • Don't spindle.

  • Nobody ever knew what spent home and never could figure it out but didn't care.

  • Don't fold, spindle or mutilate became a mean George Carlin and others used it, and it became so famous we all knew it.

  • So Annabelle Annabelle is gentle, sweet, kind, articulate.

  • And she was there, back of the dawn of Social Security and the 1979.

  • She's an older woman selected by the Social Security Administration to present to me how it waas.

  • I think you wanna love listening to Annabelle talk.

  • And towards the very end, she said something that really got me then and now, she said.

  • I work for the people I'm doing.

  • What I'm doing to help the people are citizens.

  • I don't know if government people still talk like that, but I don't feel they do the ones I've end of You don't It's just beautiful.

  • So take a look at Annabelle Social Security Administration, Baltimore, Maryland 1979 and about Tell me a little tired.

  • You're history and Social Security pictures.

  • We see that when you first went to work in session, well, when I was 17 years old, I started working for the Social Security Administration.

  • I started to work in the Candler Building, located in downtown Baltimore.

  • We didn't have too many modern conveniences there.

  • Sometimes the wind would blow the papers.

  • The wind would blow in the windows and blow the papers all over.

  • In fact, a couple times we had punch cards laying on Pratt Street and Market place.

  • But, uh, it was a nice place to work until we moved into this building in 1960.

  • This is the picture of some of the old operations that we had there.

  • This had a posting machine.

  • On the end of it, we had a ledger sheet in quarterly.

  • All of the earnings were posted.

  • Everything at that time went into a punch card because we had no computers and all of the punch cards had to be stored in files that reached from the floor to the ceiling.

  • And this was a picture of the flex align, vile.

  • This is a listing of all of the names that we have on our Social Security records.

  • And of course, this was a large metal frame with a Iraq's Or, uh, what were they panels that turned like pages in a book and, uh, had the same information on it that we have today on our mike for film at the time.

  • What was the attitude of you and your co workers towards all the paper.

  • Enormous amount.

  • Well, I didn't think too much about it at the time.

  • That was my first job.

  • And now I look back and it seems like it was very small operation compared to what we have here today.

  • Uh, of course, Uh, we couldn't do the job today, Uh, on this equipment without computers and what we would do.

  • Did you think at the time, or did your you and your fellow workers think that you really had a pretty modern equipment that you space?

  • Nobody complained at all when, um, we had a job to do, whether we were working on a tabulating machine or a sorting machine.

  • Of course, when we would get new machines in, we would feel that the we had been working on an antique, But until that time, we didn't think anything about it.

  • It was just a day's work, and we just went into the best job we had, and it functions very well on the equipment that we had.

  • People at that time didn't think of being a bureaucrat or of bureaucracy.

  • In fact, there was very little politics in social Security at that time It just was a job like people would get any other office job.

  • Just didn't seem like politics were involved at all.

  • Tell me how, how It's different now.

  • Well, I never visualized a kn operation like we have today.

  • Used to be on a very small scale.

  • Uh, we did have 10 programs a TTE that time, but they were very small compared to our four large programs today.

  • And I never I realized that I would see computers in a large complex in the operations such as we have today.

  • Now, do you think it's better today?

  • Do you think it works better with all the new information on all the new computers and all bureaucrats?

  • Um, no, I don't the like the bureaucrat part.

  • I don't like politics of entered into a government organization and especially Social Security.

  • The never seemed to be political up to this point.

  • And I don't, uh, care to see it go political.

  • I think things operate better without politics.

  • Way really worked hard in those days.

  • It doesn't seem to me like the people who are coming in today work is, uh, laborer asle e as we did in that day, we worked in the film files and operated the machines and lifted trays of cards.

  • Where's the trail cards?

  • We don't seem to have a train cars around here, but anyway, these cards were coming out of a tray about this long.

  • There's a tray of cards see stacked on the floor there, and, uh, we would lift all of these cards but your hand on the bottom and all the time and lift him into the tray.

  • So it was harder.

  • So, yes, the work was more labor work than we have today when we have more modern conveniences, more machines, things to relieve the, uh, workload.

  • What about the boredom?

  • Or what about not really getting a sense of the big picture?

  • You're just doing your moving one little card from one place to another.

  • Is that a problem?

  • Well, uh, we had a feeling that we were servicing the public, and, uh, it was a good feeling to know that someone was going to receive a monthly benefit from the work that we were doing.

  • I think in that day we had, uh, more of a sense of responsibility to the public than we have today.

  • So you think, honestly, that if that if we go and see a row 100 yards long people doing their work that they really can't tell me something about how hard it is to have a sense of accomplishment or connection with all those today, it seems, uh, that people are working just for the money, putting their time in in, uh, they don't think about, uh, who will be benefiting from their work.

It's David Happened Filmmaker with another clip from 1979.

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A2 初級

甘いアナベルは、1935年に社会保障で働くことを記述しています。 (Sweet Annabel Describes Working At Social Security In 1935)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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