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  • so imagine for a moment that you have the opportunity to go for dinner with any American living on know it.

  • Who would you choose?

  • George Washington.

  • Abraham Lincoln?

  • Rosa Parks.

  • I am.

  • I'm a foot guy.

  • And for a foot guy like me, I would choose Norman Borlaug.

  • Now, if you don't know who normal on Barlow goes, that's a really shame.

  • Because Norman was a botanist from Iowa who developed semi dwarf high yield disease resisting wheat varieties in the mid 20th century.

  • His methods transformed food production in Mexico, India and Pakistan, and that and his methods were followed across the world in many different places.

  • He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1970 the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 for his work, and it really is not an exaggeration to say that he was the man that saved a 1,000,000,000 lives.

  • Now we've had major advancements in food over the last 100 years.

  • My parents told me about World War two and post World War two, when ration books were the order of the day when there was limits on the amount of meat and eggs and butter that you could access ration books and you would only get a limited amount for your family.

  • I think where we are today, the advancements of transformed where food production is and that's being fantastic.

  • But as we sit today, we need to make much, much, much more progress in the future.

  • We need to double food production by the year 2050 on the current systems and infrastructure are just no capable off producing the amount of food that we're going to need in the year 2050 to this challenge, the challenge of food production is something that Wal Mart thinks our Lord, a boat take a commodity like bananas, which is our number one item.

  • We sell over £1.1 billion of bananas in our stores, and it's astonishing the amount of water that used to produce that banana.

  • There was bananas, the manure fertilizes.

  • It used to produce those bananas on the cost associated with that.

  • So we really feel that we face the same challenges in the world.

  • Faces on that challenge effectively is how do we produce more foods sustainably because the practices we have today one banana.

  • We sell a £1,000,000,000.1 banana, 27 gallons of water.

  • It's not sustainable as we try and grow the food for the planet.

  • And if we try and double the production, that's gonna have to happen in that period of time and at the same time is doubling production.

  • We need to produce food safe.

  • Put this affordable on food that is sustainable to the planet.

  • It is the only way forward.

  • The challenges we think about the food industry is very much about taking a holistic view.

  • The interdependency of the food industry is something I come across a lot I've got.

  • I've got a really great job, and I get the opportunity to visit some fantastic places and really interesting places.

  • One of the things that did not long ago was down in Mississippi, spending some time with some farmers who spent who produced an inordinate amount of soy and corn for helping feed people around the world.

  • On the next day, we went on a Louisiana fishing, bored to see the Gulf of Mexico.

  • That was really interesting for a Scotsman to try and communicate with two Louisiana fisherman, Let me tell you, um, we didn't really understand.

  • I think we were both speaking English but that the really ending we almost didn't need to communicate because what you could see was a dead zone where there's no fish and probably no fish, because the fertilizer runoff from where we'd be in the day before it's creating those dead zones.

  • So the economic efficiency of producing in Mississippi is creating economic problems on sustainability problems in the Gulf of Mexico.

  • So how do we resolve these things?

  • First of all, we've got to use less fertilizer, and what's really encouraging is those two progressive farmers that I sport.

  • We spent some time with in Mississippi using really good technology to try and improve how they used how the use fertilizer, using really good telling techniques to enable them to be more productive on the land that the farming so less fertilizer.

  • We also need to use Ah, lot less water on when you go to a country like Israel again is astonishing when you see is really Israeli scientists who are developed and really sophisticated drip irrigation techniques that contract one drip on the route that needs the water on Mrs the BET millimeters away that doesn't need the water and that those kind of techniques are making are transforming production and some many, many out of places around the world.

  • We can do a lot more as we think about the challenges going forward of producing More officially, there are also some opportunities to source products in new and more interesting and different places.

  • Peru Somewhere we've been spending a lot of time recently.

  • Peru.

  • Lots of water in the Andes.

  • Relatively temperate climate for an equatorial country.

  • What for?

  • The southern winds coming through on soil that can be can be fair toe.

  • But it's a country that hasn't got all our ports or harbors.

  • Hasn't got a lot of roads, so the kind of public service private service interface is too high.

  • Try and challenge these things.

  • We've opened an office in Lima.

  • We really believe that those opportunities to produce a lot more great product there that can help to feed the world.

  • So we got to produce food more efficiently.

  • But as well as producing food more efficiently, we really do have to solve the problem off food waste.

  • Let's use the food that we do produce much more effectively.

  • It's a moral imperative for us to all of us to challenge the food waste that exist across the system.

  • Not only is our moral imperative, it's really good business as well.

  • We were in M Washington looking at the apple amazing apple orchards in Washington.

  • And you see the number of apples are no harvested and they drop down onto the ground and you walk around.

  • You see apples lying on the ground.

  • You think, Why can that be?

  • Comes to comes to it that most of the apple juice that we sell here in the United States is imported because the economics make it more sensible to imported.

  • So what are the opportunity?

  • What we've been doing is we've tried to work with some processes.

  • We've just launched a US apple juice.

  • We really do think there's opportunities to do a lot more processing capacity to help use that the resources that have been created for the for those those crops.

  • So in India, 40% of all the projects produced in India or some wonderfully fertile country, 40% of all the produce wastes on it waste because the infrastructure isn't there to get it to the marketplace and get it to people's moves again.

  • We're investing a lot in India.

  • We think there's opportunities in that country on something.

  • It's got to be about more Childress tributes in facility.

  • Better roads, better distribution capabilities to enable that food to get to market cashews is another really interesting thing.

  • Cashews.

  • A lot of our cast is globally.

  • Was hella cashews globally.

  • A lot of them are produced in West Africa.

  • What happens to them as they get shipped to Vietnam, where the but the grown in West Africa shipped to west to Vietnam to be processed, then sent back to the United States to be sold?

  • It just doesn't make a lot of sense.

  • So there's lots of things going on in the food system that we think we can work on two really reduce waste on.

  • We're quite excited about some of the work that's going on there.

  • So as we move on, I really do have an optimistic future.

  • We have to produce safe, affordable on sustainable food because it's good business.

  • It's good business for Wal Mart is good business for the food system, and it's very much at the heart of how we're going to solve the food problem going forward.

  • The challenge of producing double the amount of production by the year 2050 by working together and it really is, nor one company, no matter how large console this problem on the road, it really is about the food system working together and transforming some of the practices that are out there to try and improve where we are today.

  • We really can produce bananas using less water.

  • We really can grow blueberries and keen wine.

  • Peru really effectively.

  • We really can get apple juice used the apples that are being produced in Washington.

  • We really can get India to get more of its foot to its to population.

  • On really is my hero.

  • Norman Borlaug.

  • Set man cannon must prevent the tragedy of farming in the future instead of merely trying with pious regret to salvage the human wreckage off that famine.

  • Let's hold, get together and get after this big challenge.

so imagine for a moment that you have the opportunity to go for dinner with any American living on know it.

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ジャック・シンクレア未来を養う (Jack Sinclair: Feeding the future)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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