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  • in ash.

  • In Greece, there was a form held where the question was raised.

  • How do we define a human in the simplest terms possible Now?

  • Plato certified smart golf the past.

  • I had a very interesting question and a very interesting thought process.

  • See, to him a definition just do things one.

  • It encompasses everything that the answer is, and to it excludes everything that the answer isn't.

  • And so Plato said, The Simple Terms man is a featherless bipeds now.

  • Plato was not stupid.

  • He could have said that man was a walking, talking tour using mammal.

  • But there's some men who don't walk, some men who don't talk and some men that don't use tools that doesn't make us or them any less men.

  • And in ancient Greece, there were no more soup sales, so it was simple a CZ.

  • That man was a featherless bipeds.

  • But die Argenis the cynic, another certified smart guy off the past.

  • He heard this, and he did not like this definition.

  • Adal.

  • He thought it was a bust.

  • Simplification Andi.

  • It didn't perfectly take into consideration all the variables, and he especially didn't like the fact that all of Plato's followers and everybody in society was like, Wow, great job, Plato.

  • So Dal Ginny's took a chicken.

  • You removed the chicken off its feathers.

  • So it was a feather.

  • This bip head presented it to Plato's class and proclaim, Behold a man!

  • No, Plato heard this, and he thought to himself, Well, sure, we think that this is trivial right now.

  • It's foolish.

  • It's funny.

  • It's an interesting altercation that we can tell it parties to entertain our guests.

  • But please take this very seriously.

  • After all, he had simply not followed his conventions off a definition.

  • So he said, that man is differentiate to three things.

  • The soul, which is immortal.

  • It's okay either way.

  • That's just the soul, which is immortal, the desire for an acquisition of knowledge on the tendency of man to become social and political.

  • Now we can take these seated Francie Asians, and we can apply that to artificial intelligence.

  • See, the interesting thing about it is it's a simplification, and maybe that's what we need right now.

  • No, an immortal soul.

  • What is that?

  • Let to you?

  • This is the background that we would get on default on a Windows X P computer do you put your Windows expert operating system on life support?

  • No, you don't.

  • The software wasn't born.

  • The software can't die.

  • Sure, the software has bugs, but in a perfectly artificial intelligence system, the bugs were just rectify themselves.

  • So there we go.

  • Computers have a soul that is immortal.

  • Secondly, the desire for an acquisition of knowledge cookies.

  • Every time you visit a website, it prompts you to accept cookies so you can share your data with the website.

  • It wants to know your preferences, your habits, your likes and your dislikes so it can provide you with better ads and make the intern experience easier for you.

  • And this isn't a bad thing.

  • It's it's good for you.

  • And sure it's pre programmed.

  • But so is Watson.

  • Watson is an artificial intelligence, um, computer that is used by IBM to help businesses and hospitals worldwide.

  • Watson communicated itself on a large scale to produce and have answers to situations and problems that could be present anywhere else.

  • See, Watson wants to know more and more things so it can help other people with their problems.

  • Which leads me to my third point.

  • The tendency of man to become social and political.

  • Nothing about politics is I'm a man and I'm not political.

  • Does that make me any less of a man?

  • I don't think so.

  • So we can rule that part out from Plato's own ideas off a definition.

  • So the tendency of man to become social is what makes us man or human.

  • Now we have Watson that communicates with itself on a large scale basis.

  • We have Tesla's talking themselves on the road to find out where they have to go on what they have to do that doesn't this oversimplification just help us out and show us that artificially intelligent beings could be considered human?

  • When I thought about this, I posed a question.

  • To a few family members and friends, this was the question.

  • Do you think a I would ever surpass humans?

  • Do you think a I will ever be considered human?

  • I mean, it's a totally new idea of humanness, so let's have a show of hands.

  • How many of you think that a I will ever one day surpassed humans?

  • That's perfectly normal.

  • I see backing.

  • Around the late 18 hundreds, there was a scientist who said that this is it.

  • There's nothing else we can discover in science.

  • The only thing left arm or more precise measurements.

  • The man that said that was Lord Kelvin Kelvin, more commonly known as the S I U nit for temperature.

  • But then, in 18 86 we discovered electromagnetic waves.

  • And now look where we are.

  • The clicker.

  • I use sense electromagnetic waves to change the slides.

  • The mic I use you sense electromagnetic waves, tube.

  • Send my voice.

  • Your phone's have WiFi planes, have air traffic control radio, and that's just it.

  • After 18 86 the world was revolutionized from that discovery, and now we look back and we think, How could people have lived without something that is so critical to our own existence?

  • Maybe it's a few more years, Few 50 maybe 100 years before our best friend is a walking, talking robot.

  • Anyway, now let's get to the idea of consciousness.

  • When I pointed it out to my friends and family, they said that that's not possible.

  • They can't possibly be considered human because artificial intelligence isn't conscious.

  • And then I said, How do you prove consciousness?

  • How do you prove that I am conscious?

  • Sure, I could walk around and say that I'm conscious because I believe unconscious.

  • But there's no way that you can know definitively that I am conscious.

  • You can only know that you're conscious.

  • Let's try an experiment for a second.

  • When I pull out my phone, I wanna open up, Siri.

  • I'm gonna ask Siri what it is.

  • After all, the Oxford Dictionary defines awareness or self awareness or self consciousness as the undue awareness of oneself.

  • Hey, Siri, what are you?

  • I'm Siri, but I don't like talking about myself.

  • What is theory Yours truly.

  • So does that mean that syriza where if itself I mean, sure, you could say those are pretty programmed answers.

  • But how do you know that my answers on pre programmed you don't just like how you have your own idea of happiness, that you can't apply to others and devalue your value, their level of happiness.

  • You can take my idea of consciousness or your idea of consciousness and apply it to other humans or artificially intelligent beings to validate or d validate their ideas of consciousness.

  • So, sure you could say that.

  • Well, that's a machine.

  • Artificial intelligence is a machine.

  • It doesn't have flesh and blood.

  • It can't be a person.

  • It can't be human.

  • Well, Peter Singer, one of our modern philosophers, has an idea, He says.

  • That species is, um, is basically the same thing is racism.

  • He says that maybe if a Martian walked in on this Martian looked exactly like you, not feelings at a family had a life, but it wasn't you.

  • It was a matter of flesh or blood.

  • It was made out of something else.

  • Would you give that being personhood, or would you deny it denying a being personhood?

  • Just because I'm not the same as you, I think is the same as racism.

  • Which brings me to this slavery in the modern world.

  • No, the way we are developing artificial intelligence is to do one task in one task only.

  • Maybe sometime in the future, we're gonna have artificial intelligence that is general, and it could do more than one task.

  • Maybe we have super artificial intelligence, which is even smarter than humans, but still, it's still gonna be artificial intelligence, and people are not going to give it the same rights, same responsibilities that we already have.

  • They justify their choices and their mindset with these two points that I thought were very similar to justifications about slavery.

  • So I decide to point them out.

  • Aye, aye.

  • Are inferior beings.

  • Sure.

  • They're not made out of flesh and blood.

  • Aye, aye.

  • Are no human?

  • How could they ever be?

  • They're inferior beings.

  • They're made to serve us.

  • They can't be a smartest us.

  • We're at the top of the food chain and they're not completely human.

  • This sounds a lot like something you could apply to slavery as well.

  • After all, they believe that the slaves weren't completely human.

  • Therefore was okay to treat them so badly.

  • We look at those ideas and we marked them for her.

  • Ignorant and repulsive.

  • They were.

  • But we're doing the exact same thing with the I.

  • I mean, I'm not saying that we should stop all the research and just sit as a civilization and be contented.

  • What we have what I'm saying is, let's think a bit more about this and let's try to be more ethical about this.

  • The second point they bring up it is natural that I should work for us.

  • After all, we created a I Okay, Well, it is national, that the sleeves should work for the slave owners.

  • I mean, there's a reason that they landed on Plymouth Rock.

  • That makes no sense just because it was created for one thing or it arrived.

  • For one thing that you think is the thing, should we deny it?

  • The responsibilities and the rights that we already have, if it can think like a human, wouldn't have a mind like a human consciousness, like a human opinions like a human.

  • There was an experiment held wide ago where they took a artificially intelligent software, and they put it up on the Internet after about two days of being on the Internet.

  • Daddy, I was white supremacist, Nazi and racist.

  • Those are all that.

  • Things don't get me wrong, but those are still opinions.

  • Does that make it any less human?

  • I don't think so.

  • So what happens next?

  • I think that scientists and programmers and certified smart people are working on creating artificial intelligence for the sake of creating artificial intelligence.

  • It's a good thing I agree, but maybe we should take a step back and think about the ethics off it.

  • After all, let's think about this for a second.

  • What do we do if we get generally?

  • I we put the tearing test on them.

  • That's what's been planned.

  • And then if it passes the tearing test, it is a R that is indistinguishable from humans.

  • That's what it is.

  • Let's discuss what the tearing test actually is.

  • The tearing test was devised by Alan Tearing in 1950.

  • Does that make any sense to you?

  • I mean, think about it.

  • Are you using the same computers that you were using in 1950?

  • Not at all technologies rapidly advancing.

  • But our methods of classifying this technology and our ethics about these technology aren't advancing.

  • This Foster's it as the technology itself.

  • I mean, the tooling test has already been beaten by an A I chat ball called Eugene Guzman in 2014 and if that shot what was actually smart enough, we would have artificially intelligent friends and artificially intelligent beings roaming around everywhere.

  • But we don't and that's because the tearing test, I think is outdated.

  • We need to change.

  • We need to think we need to be more ethically aware what it was fast.

  • Look at how fast a I research is advancing since Y two k.

  • We just about 20 years ago.

  • 14.

  • Research goes 14 times each year for air startups.

  • Investment into a I buy.

  • Venture capitalists increases six times each year that more and more jobs requiring applicants to have a background in a i.

  • In around 2010 there were about 10 K papers be released each year about artificial intelligence research.

  • And now in 25 are from the last census that was stolen.

  • 2015.

  • There were 20 K papers being released each year.

  • We're speeding towards technological innovation.

  • I think we got unethical innovation as well.

  • Thank you.

in ash.

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AIか現代の奴隷か?| ヴェーダンク・サポリア|[email protected] (AI or modern slavery? | Vedank Sapolia | [email protected])

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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