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  • So this is a photo of my family and the tall pretty girl in the front row.

  • She's my mom.

  • It was actually taken shortly before her life would forever change.

  • In 1975 the Communists took over Cambodia.

  • The canary is toppled the government, and they forced millions of people into the countryside at gunpoint.

  • And over the next four years, roughly two million people died, including my grandmother and half the Children in this photo and what we now know, Woz.

  • The killing fields.

  • When the marriage fell in 1979 my mom was finally free.

  • But she had nowhere to go her home it and looted her family, devastated and her country destroyed.

  • So she walked.

  • Like thousands of other Cambodians.

  • Their goal was to get to a refugee camp in Thailand and hopes that someone, anyone there, could help them rebuild their lives in order to get there.

  • My mom, grandfather and her two surviving siblings, they relied on other people for help.

  • Some would carry the small Children too hungry and exhausted to move on, and others they would search the Fords for food, hoping and praying to avoid one of the millions of land mines have been planted during the war.

  • Everything they did during their flight, it was completely interdependent.

  • And for them that interdependence.

  • It was a matter of life or death.

  • After a few years at the refugee camp, my family got some good news.

  • They were the lucky ones chosen to be resettled in the United States, and this is a really big deal.

  • Because of the 21 million refugees day, less than 1% of them will ever be resettled that with my family guy here, they had no money, no assets, nothing.

  • But despite the odds, they survived.

  • And not only that, they crushed it, but really, when you consider the limited resources and opportunities they've had, so many refugees, just like my family, have been so successful in this country.

  • And in light of the biggest refugee crisis we've seen since World War Two, it really begs the question.

  • How is that possible?

  • How did we get from people like my mom, a survivor of genocide?

  • To people like me, just one generation removed, enjoying privileges like higher education, economic opportunity and so much more.

  • We got here because of that interdependence, and that same team mentality that helped my mom survived is alive in refugee came news around the World's Day.

  • We hear so much about refugees, and almost all of it is negative.

  • But there's another side to the story here.

  • It's a story of triumph, of empowerment and what I call the collective success mindset to believe that each one of us has an important role to play in the success of the community and their big lessons.

  • We can learn from this.

  • I believe the collective success minds that we've seen in refugees can actually improve the way we do business.

  • And despite what you may think, the refugee collectivist mindset and the self interested foundations of capitalism are not in conflict with each other.

  • They're actually complimentary because of growing up in my community.

  • Is Tom.

  • Anything is that there doesn't have to be a trade off between value for you in value for others, which means businesses.

  • They could be even more successful if they took a page from the refugee playbook.

  • And lesson on that first page is to create cultures of empowerment.

  • Before I was born, a young man named Sonny came to live with my family.

  • He had spent years living one those Thai refugee camps, similar to the one my mom had come from but my dad.

  • He been granted political asylum this country years before, so he took me in and he enrolled him in school.

  • But because war had re tab become Sonny's life said he had never been to school.

  • And because Sonny had never been to school, 14 year old Sonny was placed in kindergarten, understanding how difficult it was to start all over with nothing.

  • My dad not only provided Sonny with a home, but with counseling, to accelerate his learning both inside and outside the classroom.

  • And today, that 14 year old kindergartner, he's an engineer and a proud American citizen who works with our intelligence communities to fight the rial terrace If you have my dad, his actions were neither heroic, no charitable, my community.

  • Rather, they reflected his sense of duty, a duty that exists among established communities of former refugees to empower and help next wave.

  • And this lesson has really stuck with me.

  • So I cannot but wonder what if we had a sense of duty to empower each other and help business succeed it's actually not a crazy idea.

  • Johnny Founder Hump de Luca has created a brand that dominates Greek yogurt.

  • But even in all his success, Luc I recently did something remarkable.

  • He voluntarily gave up to 10% of his company to his workers, and doing so was the best decision he could have made.

  • Because some research shows that employee owned companies they tend to outperform the competition because when everyone has skin in the game, they're far more likely to make sure the whole succeeds.

  • Which Bunny's shows us is that business doesn't have to be a zero sum game, and what I mean is the belief that we're burdened with costs when we help other people.

  • It's just such an outdated to approach to the way values actually created.

  • Instead, when you empower others, the whole team advances.

  • Leading me to playbook.

  • Lesson number two communities can shorten the race.

  • When my mom was resettled here, she lived in close proximity to other refugees.

  • So growing up we go to Chris, she stores and hair salons and other small businesses owned by fellow Cambodians and a lot of the small business owners there.

  • Also, patrons of my dad's accounting practice.

  • You see, my parents chose to spend their money at Cambodian owned businesses because they knew that money would directly go back into helping the community, which would also help my family.

  • Now, to outsiders, us choosing the patronize Cambodian owned businesses looks like an unwillingness to assimilate.

  • And this criticism isn't just limited to my community, refugees and really all immigrants.

  • They get criticized all the time for not assimilating fast enough.

  • But here's what's really going on.

  • What appears to be a lack of assimilation is actually the power of collective buying in action.

  • And this is really important because as those communities become more successful, it actually shortens the assimilation process for the next wave.

  • What this means is, as consumer where you choose to spend your money really matters.

  • What if we chose this better money at businesses that reflected our values?

  • If nothing's did so when that compel others to follow suit, the way we spend her money could shorten the race because it makes it easier and faster for businesses to adopt good policies and make those policies norm.

  • And just consider I Kia.

  • The company is taking offensive position and doing something I think is really great.

  • By 2020 Ikey aims to make 100% of its supply chain sustainable.

  • In order to do this, it's having to radically alter the way designs, collects and recycles furniture.

  • And this is leading to the development of new business.

  • Models I've done correctly could get replicated by other big companies around the world.

  • When the power of collective buying compels more than to do so, we all win, leading me to the final page of the playbook.

  • Capitalism is best played as a team sport when the economy crashed in 2008.

  • My family's financial stability crash and burn with it in a flash.

  • My refugee parents once again and found themselves in a bad situation for my community.

  • We rallied around us like good defensive players.

  • They protected us from taking more hits.

  • They cooked his meals, dropped off groceries and Linda's a car so we could drive to work in school.

  • Have her bigger, small, their efforts.

  • It did so much just to make us a little happier every day and give us the strength, get back up on her feet and get back into the game if you were in trouble, would your company's step up to help you?

  • And would you do the same thing if your company was in trouble?

  • For the employees and the management team at Lincoln Electric, the answer would be yes.

  • What's remarkable about this company is that despite numerous economic downturns, hasn't laid off the single employee in normal 70 years.

  • Because when times were tough, everyone shares the burden from the CEO down to the workers on the line.

  • They make sacrifices like taking reduce wages and hours because they know then order to weather the storm.

  • It's an all hands on deck effort.

  • And when the company is thriving, everyone enjoys the security.

  • And, by the way, doesn't present Streak hasn't come at the expense of the company.

  • Today, Lincoln Electric remains highly profitable and the market leader in its industry.

  • Just like refugee communities.

  • Lincoln Electric shows us that we're all stronger when we think and act of the team.

  • When we stick our necks out just a little bit for the person standing tour right into the person sitting to our left, we're far more likely to get the help that we need in return.

  • I stand here on the stage today as a product of the collective success mindset that ran through the veins of my parents refugee community.

  • It is because of that mindset.

  • I went to college in graduate school, and now I work in business.

  • So, to me the idea that capitalism and collectivism are actually complimentary it just couldn't be more obvious.

  • Just imagine all the value we create.

  • If businesses could apply these refugee lessons into the way they do things today, they could become accelerators for good policies that benefit all of us.

  • Just by shifting the mindset from the individual to the group and the world is moving in this direction.

  • Big companies like Airbnb, Facebook in Patagonia, they realize the value of community, and they're integrating into the way they do things today.

  • But they can't do it alone.

  • No one person or company can, because while good teams win games, it's cohesive Teams that win championships.

  • So what if we adopted the refugee playbook and worked as a team to create a better future for not just any one person but for all of us?

So this is a photo of my family and the tall pretty girl in the front row.

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難民コミュニティからビジネスが学べること|クリスティン・タック|TED Institute (What businesses can learn from refugee communities | Christine Thach | TED Institute)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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