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  • flow.

  • So I see my art students struggle every time I assigned a new art project of them.

  • I've been teaching art here a bellman university for the last few years, and it is hard at the beginning of every new project to give them that pressure to come up with something unique and original new.

  • And I remember what was like when I was an undergrad student to, um I didn't necessarily know what I was making all the time or had a style or felt like I was making artwork about something all the time.

  • And I was really envious of those students who just seemed to be driven.

  • They always kind of knew what they were gonna make and had a style every time and coming back to my students.

  • They always seem to ask me the same questions at the beginning.

  • Which is, um, is this idea good?

  • Or will this get me a good grade or, you know, what do you think?

  • And I always turn it back on them.

  • I was like, Well, is it good?

  • What do you think?

  • Um, I think the mistake that many of them make is thinking that the creative revelation comes in the ideation process that it's the idea where they're like Ah ha, that was the hard part.

  • Now I know what to make.

  • I think that we are idea machines, that we can brainstorm 100 ideas in the 1st 5 minutes of being challenged to make something new.

  • Uh, the real challenge and the rial creative revelation is in asking that question that sparks project after project after project and could make a career, and it will help you achieve that style.

  • I recently was contacted by a former student who's asking for a letter of recommendation for a grant application, and I reached backed out to her and I said, Why me?

  • It's been five years.

  • We had one class together.

  • I was a grad student at the time, and she told me she is asking me because in my class she completely rethought.

  • What artwork and making artwork.

  • Waas.

  • Because I was the first teacher to ask her why she was making that she made.

  • She said that most other teachers would grade her work on what they expected her the project to be, and I was the first teacher toe.

  • Ask them if their work was successful for their vision, and I realized what she did was she put words to a teaching philosophy that I had never really put words to, and that is what I try to give.

  • My students are the tools to achieve that creative revelation that they can use to move forward year after year after they're out of my class.

  • So I'm here to share three steps that you ca n't take to create your own creative revelation that will help you find your purpose and your style.

  • So Step number one is to just take action and quiet your judgment.

  • So just like those questions that my students always ask, Is it good?

  • What do you think?

  • I just say?

  • I don't know.

  • Try it out.

  • Start to sketch, start to make quiet all those doubts and just start making.

  • And if the problem is the process, you don't know what to make or how.

  • Then I say, just copy people.

  • There are plenty of artists who have figured it out, and they've done it.

  • So how can you take their process or their ideas and put your own twist on it?

  • So one of these images up here is a piece that I made and another is a picture I took of a solid wall drawing from the Mass MoCA Museum in Massachusetts.

  • When I was an undergrad, I fell in love with Salo.

  • It's work.

  • He is one of the founders of conceptual art, and he believed that the idea was more important than the actual execution of the work.

  • Ah, and I just love the fact that he could simply write instructions on how to make work and he would sell that, and then other people would paint the wall after his instruction.

  • So to put my own spin on it, I would take stuff like glossy paper and my interest in origami, and I would fold the paper and leave a crease and just follow his instructions.

  • What I was doing was just trying on his style for size to see if it fits.

  • And that's what I encourage my students to do is they've done it.

  • Put your own spin on it, see if it fits, and if it doesn't, that's okay.

  • You've learned something to keep going.

  • Just keep making and keep making step.

  • Number two make a daily practice, make it a part of your routine.

  • So about junior year of my undergrad, I was in a class and we were talking about public art and specifically, those large public sculptures you see around town.

  • I always thought of them as playground equipment.

  • I always looked like fun things to climb on.

  • So my professor challenged me to share.

  • My perspective is someone who climbs, and I then put a VHS recorder on my head and walked in a straight line and climbed anything I encountered.

  • And when I shared that video with my class, I got a mix of engagement some people couldn't watch.

  • It was too nauseated.

  • Others loved it.

  • Others kind of made him think of childhood tree climbing stories.

  • But what it had done that none of my work had ever done was really engaged the audience.

  • For the first time, I realized I had hit on a creative revelation that that question of what's it mean to share my perspective as a climber led to work after work after work.

  • So I made my senior project on all tree climbing projects.

  • But when I left school and I left that structure, I struggled for four years to figure out how to make a career out of being an artist who makes work about climbing trees.

  • But I got my first artist residency at Mount ST Francis in southern Indiana, and I had six months to explore their 400 acres of trees and fields.

  • So, just like an artist, would use a sketchbook to practice drawing every day.

  • I decided I would climb a tree every day, so I went out, found a tree climb to size.

  • I could, I wrote in a journal How it went.

  • Took a couple pictures, and then I went out the next day and did it again.

  • I did that without missing a day for six months, and I just couldn't stop.

  • So it became a year in two years in three years, and what I found in doing this daily practice was I did get stronger climbing, and I was putting myself in that place where I was thinking about what it meant to be a climber, and I was coming up with all kinds of art projects to share that perspective.

  • For the first time, I gained the confidence to really say that I was an artist and I was selling work and I was building a career.

  • And that brings me to Step three, which is Watch out for labels and be wary of becoming the art that you make and taking that on as an identity.

  • I had gotten so confident in the 12 years that I made art as a tree climber that I became the tree climbing guy.

  • I was so confident that I could go out in public like this.

  • Yeah, to make this lighten up Siri's, which was long exposure photographs sharing my route through the trees end That daily climb project finally ended after 1187 days in a row because I was working hard on the sculpture project and midnight came and went and I had a conga tree, and that started a five year struggle with my identity.

  • I didn't know what it meant anymore to make.

  • Art wasn't about climbing trees, so I cried a bit.

  • I kept climbing.

  • I didn't know what to Dio.

  • I was like Maybe I'll give up, But I finally decided maybe I should go back to school.

  • So 11 years after undergrad, I went back to get my M f A and I followed step number one.

  • I just started take action and didn't judge it.

  • I didn't worry if it was about trees or if it was good.

  • I copied some people.

  • I took bio art classes and sound design and media geography, and I just made everything I could.

  • I also showed up daily to my studio, and I made sure that I was working or thinking or trying to make something new, and I was really challenging that identity.

  • And when I completed my M F A, the city of Louisville had put out a call for public art proposals having to do with alternative modes of transportation.

  • And so finally I put a project out there had nothing to do with climbing trees, and it got accepted.

  • And it became back since Level This project launched last summer in July, and what it is, is I'm giving little sensors 200 volunteer cyclists around the city, and these sensors will track where they go, the temperature and the air quality that they encounter along the way.

  • And I'm using all that data in real time and turning it into a sound for use that is playing on the Big Four Bridge right now, and it's also can be heard on bike since dot net.

  • So this is a really exciting, very uncertain place for me because I don't have the same confidence that I did when I was making work back climbing trees.

  • But I'm really excited about where this could go and how this might lead to another creative revelation.

  • So invite you all to follow those three steps to take action without judgment, to make a daily practice and to watch out for those labels and becoming the art that you make.

  • I don't want to become another bike artist so that I can have a long career and follow my interests as they travel.

  • Thank you.

flow.

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A2 初級

創造的な啓示|トッド・スミス|TEDxBellarmineU (Creative Revelation | Todd Smith | TEDxBellarmineU)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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