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  • GWEN IFILL: Good evening, and welcome to this special "PBS NewsHour" coverage of the New

  • Hampshire primary.

  • I'm Gwen Ifill.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF: And I'm Judy Woodruff.

  • They finished second in Iowa, but, tonight, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump have claimed

  • victory in New Hampshire.

  • Democrat Sanders scored a resounding win over Hillary Clinton.

  • It guarantees him a majority of the 24 delegates at stake.

  • And Republican Trump won big in a crowded field, with John Kasich finishing second.

  • Trump will take at least nine of that state's 23 GOP delegates.

  • In the battle for third place on the Republican side, Ted Cruz, Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio continued

  • in a tight race late into the night.

  • As results came into focus, the candidates came out to claim victory and offer concessions.

  • GWEN IFILL: Donald Trump was triumphant as he appeared before a crowd of supporters in

  • Manchester.

  • DONALD TRUMP (R), Presidential Candidate: We want to thank the people of New Hampshire,

  • right?

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • DONALD TRUMP: Do we love the people of New Hampshire?

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • DONALD TRUMP: You know, I said it.

  • And I said it even a year ago.

  • I think, I'm going to do really well there, because I'm here a lot.

  • And it's so beautiful.

  • And I love it so much.

  • And I love the people.

  • And I said I actually think they like me a lot.

  • And then, all of a sudden, we started getting numbers in.

  • And everyone said, how come they like Trump so much?

  • But I have so many friends up here.

  • And they are special, special people.

  • So, New Hampshire, I want to thank you.

  • We love you.

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • DONALD TRUMP: We're going to be back a lot.

  • We're not going to forget you.

  • You started it.

  • Remember, you started it.

  • GWEN IFILL: Meanwhile, Bernie Sanders revved up a jubilant crowd of his supporters in Concord.

  • SEN.

  • BERNIE SANDERS (VT-I), Presidential Candidate: And let me take this opportunity to thank

  • the many, many thousands of volunteers here in the Granite State who worked so tirelessly.

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN.

  • BERNIE SANDERS: Our volunteers worked night and day, made phone calls, and knocked on

  • a heck of a lot of doors.

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN.

  • BERNIE SANDERS: And we won because of your energy.

  • Thank you all so much.

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN.

  • BERNIE SANDERS: I want to thank Julia Barnes and our great campaign staff.

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN.

  • BERNIE SANDERS: Together, we have sent a message that will echo from Wall Street to Washington,

  • from Maine to California.

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN.

  • BERNIE SANDERS: And that is that the government of our great country belongs to all of the

  • people, and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors and their super PACs.

  • (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • GWEN IFILL: And now we go to our political director, Lisa Desjardins, who is reporting

  • for us tonight in Manchester, New Hampshire.

  • Lisa, you have had your ear to the ground, talking to voters, talking to candidates.

  • What have you learned in the past several days while you have been in New Hampshire

  • that explains what we saw happen tonight?

  • LISA DESJARDINS: Dramatic results for those of us watching, I think, from outside of New

  • Hampshire, maybe not as dramatic, Gwen, for voters here.

  • Going to the polls this morning, the names I heard from voters were the same names that

  • are doing well tonight.

  • Let's start with Donald Trump.

  • Voters who told me that they were supporting Donald Trump told me that they were doing

  • it despite fact that they think he might be someone who is offensive.

  • They think that this country needs someone who is going to be a strong leader and who

  • -- maybe who will offend people, especially offend, in their words, America's enemies.

  • I think the strong leader label also might apply in way to Bernie Sanders.

  • When I talked to Democrats who voted for Bernie Sanders today -- and there were many, many

  • of them, as the results are showing -- they said they like that he has been genuine and

  • he has pushed for his ideas, even when they were remarkably unpopular, to today, when

  • they're gaining traction.

  • They see that a kind of strength.

  • Those voters who chose not to go for Hillary Clinton said they felt that she is someone

  • who is trying too hard to say what the people want to hear, vs. strong leader type is what

  • they see in Bernie Sanders.

  • Not to oversimplify things, but I think that was a very real theme for voters here in New

  • Hampshire today.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF: And, Lisa, were you able to tell what it is that people want the strong

  • leader to do?

  • What is the source of the unhappiness, the frustration, the anger?

  • Were you able to figure -- pick that up from people?

  • LISA DESJARDINS: Yes, it is absolutely the economy, Judy and Gwen.

  • Here in New Hampshire, incomes are far above average in the -- of the country, unemployment

  • levels are low, but yet many voters here don't feel like things are getting better.

  • And even more so, they are worried about their children's future.

  • They're worried about student loan debt, which is very high in this state.

  • And they don't see anything changing to help that situation.

  • They think new ideas are the only way for things to go -- get on a better course for

  • them.

  • And they say they weren't hearing new ideas from other candidates.

  • Now, all of this said, it should be remarked that John Kasich also had a big night.

  • He won, I think, with voters who are looking for a more stable, proven leader, someone

  • who also they related to personally.

  • He went out, shook hands in this state, sat by firesides, quite literally.

  • And I think that made a difference here for him.

  • I also think it's really going to be interesting to watch the Marco Rubio-Jeb Bush race with

  • -- for number three with Ted Cruz.

  • I just came from Marco Rubio's concession speech.

  • Fascinatingly enough, right off the top, he said: This was my fault.

  • It was my poor performance in the debate that led to this.

  • And he apologized to his followers.

  • He said it won't happen again.

  • It was a very interesting moment for Marco Rubio, a sign that he is going to try and

  • reverse course or kind of get back on track after New Hampshire.

  • GWEN IFILL: That's what I want to ask you about a little bit, Lisa, because Marco Rubio

  • did an unusual thing in admitting that it was his fault.

  • But we also see lot of other candidates who didn't necessarily benefit, like Chris Christie,

  • who was a weapon against Marco Rubio the other night.

  • Do we know who might go home after tonight?

  • LISA DESJARDINS: Well, we know that Chris Christie is taking at least a little bit of

  • time off the trail to sort of recoup and take another look at his campaign.

  • There were some false reports that he was announcing a suspension earlier tonight.

  • But, instead, what is actually happening, we're told, is that he is just taking some

  • time to take a look.

  • I do think he's got he -- he's got to really take a hard look at what's ahead, especially

  • going into South Carolina.

  • We haven't talked about Ben Carson or Carly Fiorina very much.

  • They're at the very bottom of the New Hampshire pack.

  • And I think, as far as staffing, money, and momentum go, those two candidates have to

  • really make some difficult choices probably in the next few weeks ahead.

  • GWEN IFILL: OK.

  • Well, Lisa, thank you so much for your contributions tonight and all week long in New Hampshire.

  • LISA DESJARDINS: It's been amazing to be here.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF: And now we're joined by Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report.

  • So, Amy, you have been poring over those exit polls, interviews with voters as they left

  • the polling places in New Hampshire.

  • What are you seeing that you could add to what Lisa's talking -- hearing from voters

  • on the ground?

  • AMY WALTER, The Cook Political Report: Well, it's very interesting, because what we're

  • seeing from the exit polls, it lines up in some ways, the idea that Trump is going to

  • be the candidate that is going to shake things up.

  • But it doesn't mean that the majority of Republicans in the state feel that that's what they would

  • like to see going forward.

  • In fact, when you asked the question if Trump won the nomination, would you be satisfied

  • with him as the nominee, voters, Republicans voters were evenly divided; 49 percent said,

  • 48 percent said no.

  • So, he won a -- want to give him his due.

  • He won a big victory tonight, but he's still a very polarizing figure among Republicans.

  • GWEN IFILL: So, is it fair to say that neither Republicans who voted overwhelmingly for Donald

  • Trump tonight and -- or Democrats who voted overwhelmingly for Bernie Sanders tonight

  • give a fig about electability?

  • (LAUGHTER)

  • AMY WALTER: It is -- that is a heart over the head, I think, is one theme in this election

  • in New Hampshire tonight.

  • In fact, when I looked at what Democrats were saying, for those who said that the most important

  • issue to them was who can win in November and who has the most experience, Hillary Clinton

  • was winning those voters with 81, 82 percent.

  • But when you asked them -- or when those voters said it was honest -- who was honest and trustworthy,

  • who they thought was the most relatable, who understood them, Bernie Sanders wins by big,

  • big, big margins.

  • The problem for Hillary Clinton is that her message of electability, while she's winning

  • it, wasn't seen as important as sort of the heart issues.

  • (CROSSTALK)

  • AMY WALTER: That's right.

  • Sixty percent of voters wanted to see somebody who they could relate to and who they saw

  • as honest and trustworthy.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF: So, what is the message Hillary Clinton can take from here?

  • AMY WALTER: Well, that...

  • JUDY WOODRUFF: She told -- she told the crowd tonight: We're going to go vote after vote,

  • state after state.

  • But what is the message she carries from New Hampshire?

  • AMY WALTER: Well, this is going to be her challenge going forward is how she balances

  • that heart and that head.

  • We talked about this the other night, that the best candidates are the ones who campaign

  • in poetry and then govern in prose.

  • She seems stuck on prose and hasn't really found much poetry.

  • So, finding a way to get that gap smaller.

  • And when she is talking about the firewall of these next few states that she's going

  • to now after New Hampshire, especially South Carolina, that are more diverse -- these are

  • overwhelmingly white states -- she's hoping that her success with minority voters will

  • help put her over the top in those states.

  • But I don't know.

  • But she's got to be able to -- now that she's lost in New Hampshire, does she still have

  • that...

  • (CROSSTALK)

  • GWEN IFILL: Well, that's the thing.

  • Every piece of conventional wisdom this year has gone out the window.

  • AMY WALTER: Exactly.

  • Exactly.

  • GWEN IFILL: So, do firewalls even exist anymore?

  • AMY WALTER: That's right.

  • And when you start -- when you hear a campaign start talking about firewalls, then you know

  • have a problem, right?

  • When the campaign -- that is usually -- the issue is the message and the messenger are

  • usually the bigger problem.

  • And Bernie Sanders, his message is resonating.

  • Again, we haven't seen it resonate outside two small states that are pretty homogeneous.

  • Let's see how it -- once we get into states that are a little more diverse and bigger

  • if that is still going to work.

  • But it's clearly struck a chord.

  • And I think the problems that we're seeing for Hillary Clinton raised in New Hampshire,

  • raised in Iowa are going to continue to dog her.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF: And fascinating, the difficulty she's had with women voters.

  • She made this a central feature of her campaign this time, unlike in 2008.

  • And yet Bernie Sanders won with women.

  • And she had very tough time with women in Iowa.

  • AMY WALTER: He won with women narrowly.

  • But here is the other takeaway.

  • He won among men by over 30 points.

  • That is remarkable.

  • So, we spent a whole lot of time talking about, will women rally around her?

  • We kind of ignored the fact that...

  • (CROSSTALK)

  • GWEN IFILL: There could be a backlash.

  • AMY WALTER: That's right, or that she's not finding a way to connect with men in the way

  • that she needs to.

  • GWEN IFILL: I don't want to underplay Donald Trump's victory tonight.

  • He exceeded expectations, 2-1, I think, over John Kasich, who came in number two.

  • AMY WALTER: Yes, absolutely.

  • GWEN IFILL: He even seemed a little bit surprised and muted by it tonight.

  • AMY WALTER: Yes.

  • GWEN IFILL: So, what does he do next?

  • AMY WALTER: Well, he goes to South Carolina.

  • And I think this gives him a great, big boost.

  • He's in a great position in South Carolina.

  • He was already running ahead in that state.

  • And he also benefits from the fact that that establishment that was supposed to coalesce

  • behind one candidate in New Hampshire still looks like a muddled mess.

  • So, we go into South Carolina with a Rubio, a Christie, a Kasich battling for that.

  • Cruz, I think, will do well in South Carolina.

  • And right now, that is going to be the big thing to look for, is Cruz vs. Trump in South

  • Carolina.

  • Do they go at it so hard that it allows a third candidate to come up and win?

  • GWEN IFILL: Fascinating.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF: Fascinating, so many questions.

  • Amy Walter, thank you.

  • AMY WALTER: Thank you.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF: And we're going to do some digging now into facts and figures that aren't