Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • [music]

  • The United States Food and Drug Administration presents

  • "The Food Label and You."

  • Now here's your host, Dr. Samuel Franklin.

  • Hello.

  • I am Dr. Samuel Franklin with the United States

  • Food and Drug Administration.

  • Today, significant advances in the areas of nutrition science

  • and modern day chemistry make the United States one of

  • the foremost authorities in the production and supply--

  • [music]

  • We've all got to eat three squares a day:

  • breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

  • And most of the time I bet you don't even think

  • about what you're eating.

  • That's not good.

  • Your body is like a fine tuned machine.

  • The food you eat is the fuel that keeps you running,

  • but how do you know the nutritional value

  • in that cup of yogurt or that bowl of cereal?

  • Look on the label.

  • Hey, I'm Gia and I'm here to talk about

  • the nutrition facts label.

  • If you want to stay healthy and energetic,

  • then reading and understanding food labels can help you make

  • food choices that give you more energy

  • and help you feel your best.

  • And we can all use a little more brain power.

  • Don't say it.

  • Don't even think it.

  • There are three things you need to know about

  • the nutrition facts label, just three.

  • Calories, serving size, and percent daily value.

  • Got it?

  • Well, if you still feel kind of overwhelmed by the whole idea

  • of actually reading and understanding food labels,

  • you're not alone.

  • Let's see how much the ordinary person on the street knows

  • about this subject.

  • Thanks, Gia.

  • Well, it's a little cold for dining al fresco,

  • but we've got work to do.

  • Let's find our first victim.

  • So what do you think is the official serving size

  • of a bowl of cereal?

  • I think that one.

  • That one? Yes.

  • Two. Two?

  • 'Cause I'd probably eat number two.

  • Totally two.

  • What would be the official serving size of cereal?

  • Number three. It looks like number three.

  • Tell me which number you think?

  • Bowl number two.

  • Your opinion on what you think an official serving size

  • of cereal might be.

  • Three. Would you eat what's in--

  • Oh, I didn't know. Bowl number three.

  • You would--big breakfast.

  • What's in bowl one, bowl two, or bowl three?

  • I would probably do two.

  • Would you point to what you think would be an official size?

  • I think it's a lot smaller than I usually have.

  • Lots more than I think it is.

  • I think it's gonna be number one.

  • My work is done here.

  • Okay, we're gonna make this easy to understand

  • because this can be confusing.

  • For instance, if I have 1 of those 20 ounce sodas,

  • how many servings is that?

  • One? Two? Twenty?

  • You're craving a nice, juicy burger.

  • How many calories are you getting?

  • Add cheese, supersize it, you know the calories are going

  • ka-ching, ka-ching.

  • But exactly how many are there?

  • If you eat 18 grams of fat, which is 28% DV at breakfast,

  • how much can you eat at lunch to remain below

  • the recommended daily value?

  • Have the salad.

  • Okay, it's not algebra, but you do need to do a little math

  • to make the best food choices you can.

  • To give us a hand, we've turned to the experts at CSI

  • to help us out, the calorie scene investigators.

  • [music]

  • Hey, don't tamper with the evidence.

  • What do we got so far, Sally?

  • Well, I think we're up against the toughest case

  • this lab has ever had.

  • I've got a serving of vanilla ice cream.

  • That's exhibit A in the new caloriemograph our lab just got.

  • Oh, yes.

  • We're the first to get the multimillion dollar

  • caloriemograph.

  • Checking calories, huh?

  • You know, calories provide a measure of how much energy

  • is in a serving of this food. That's right.

  • And calories are assessed based on serving size.

  • And as a calorie scene investigator,

  • I have come to find that appearances can be deceiving.

  • Consuming too many calories per day can lead to obesity

  • and being overweight.

  • Here's what doesn't add up, Derrick.

  • I'm getting a calorie reading of 150 calories for 1 serving

  • of exhibit A, vanilla ice cream, while an identical serving

  • of fruit juice pop is only 60 calories.

  • The same serving size of the frozen juice pop has almost

  • a third of the calories of exhibit A?

  • That's right.

  • Then let's call the juice pop exhibit B.

  • Good idea.

  • Let's check past histories to see if there's a trend.

  • Hand over those chips.

  • I want to get an analysis of them.

  • This isn't gonna be pretty.

  • [music]

  • Oh, only 170 calories per serving.

  • Not so bad.

  • But Derrick, do you know the reading I'm getting

  • for a serving size?

  • Nine to fifteen chips.

  • Yeah? No biggie.

  • Actually, it's really not very big.

  • The point is you've already had about 30 without even thinking.

  • How can this be? I didn't even eat the whole bag.

  • I've got to contact Lieutenant Vain

  • and tell him our new finding.

  • [music]

  • Thank you, Derrick.

  • Let me know when the final results are in.

  • Well, Pete, while we were making a case for calories,

  • Derrick seems to think that the answer lies in serving size.

  • And serving sizes are not always what they appear to be.

  • What's going on here?

  • Ma'am, this is a calorie scene investigation.

  • I'm CSI Lieutenant Vain.

  • I'm going to have to inspect your groceries

  • before you enter the scene.

  • What are you looking for?

  • We're looking for calorie content and its elusive

  • accomplice, serving size.

  • These will have to go back to the lab.

  • The lab? Why the lab?

  • Don't worry, ma'am.

  • With our multimillion dollar caloriemograph,

  • we can tell exactly how many calories

  • are in a single serving.

  • Multimillions?

  • Lieutenant Vain, there is no need to go to all that trouble.

  • Why don't you enlighten me?

  • When I go shopping,

  • I just look at the nutrition facts label.

  • Just the nutrition facts label, ma'am?

  • It tells me everything I need to know about the percent

  • daily values of the food that I buy for my family.

  • Let me show you.

  • Each label actually starts out with serving size

  • and calories per serving size.

  • So peanut butter, serving size is 2 tablespoons,

  • that's 190 calories.

  • Hummus is 70 calories for 2 tablespoons.

  • Hummus, the Middle Eastern dip made from mashed cooked

  • chick peas, blended with lemon juice, tahini, garlic,

  • olive oil, and salt.

  • It became quite popular in the U.S., but what I didn't know is

  • that it was so low calorie.

  • But here's the tricky part.

  • While 2 tablespoons of peanut butter or hummus might be

  • satisfying, they aren't necessarily what I would eat

  • in a sitting.

  • And they certainly aren't what my growing son would eat.

  • He's on the swim team and his idea of a serving can be totally

  • different from what's on a label.

  • Luckily he swims a lot.

  • Ma'am, what about this bag?

  • May I?

  • Mm, while this bag might seem like one serving

  • to my son's untrained eye, there are actually

  • two and a half servings here.

  • That means instead of 140 calories,

  • it's actually 350 calories.

  • And that extra 200 calories a day can add up to 20 pounds

  • of weight gain over the course of a year.

  • What's interesting is that serving sizes are often given

  • in familiar measurements like cups or pieces.

  • Even so, a package may contain more than one serving.

  • For instance, milk is calculated based on an 8-ounce cup serving.

  • I guess that is just the way the calorie cookie crumbles.

  • [music]

  • Serving size, servings per container, calories per serving.

  • Starting to get the picture?

  • Well, how do you tell just what a single serving is when it's

  • something like cereal?

  • For instance, which of these bowls is the right size

  • for a single serving of cereal?

  • As described on most cereal boxes, you're thinking,

  • pfft, both of 'em.

  • I want a bowl of cereal and they're bowls, right?

  • But that's exactly the problem, they're bowls.

  • But the nutrition facts label is based on a cup of cereal.

  • Not how I eat cereal.

  • Now that's a bowl of cereal, but it takes about 2 cups

  • to fill this bowl.

  • That's two servings you're eating at once.

  • Add milk and you've got a lot of calories.

  • That's why it's so important to pay attention

  • to the nutrition facts label.

  • Sure, bowls come in all different sizes,

  • but mostly they hold more than a cup.

  • And an 8 ounce cup is the serving size listed

  • on most cereal food labels based on a typical

  • 2,000 calorie-a-day diet.

  • So even if you eat a healthy, low fat, low sugar,

  • high fiber cereal, eating enough of it tips the scales,

  • literally.

  • Pour yourself a bowl of high protein granola with lots

  • of nuts and dried fruit.

  • That's more than you need if you're sitting at the computer

  • all day, but fine if you're planning a workout

  • like running or hiking.

  • It's all about balance.

  • And there's actually a nutritional rule to help you

  • achieve balance in your eating habits.

  • Ever heard of the 5-20 rule?

  • It sounds just about as complicated as a mathematical

  • equation, but let's see if anybody here on the street

  • can help us out.

  • Excuse me, sir.

  • What's the 5-20 rule?

  • I don't know what the 5-20 rule is actually.

  • I've never heard of it.

  • It sounds like a tax code thing.

  • The 5-20 rule.

  • Exactly.

  • Any ideas, Sam?

  • Yeah.

  • Maybe vitamins?

  • Five carbs, twenty grains?

  • There--wait, are there five or seven--?

  • Let's keep asking the 5-20 rule.

  • Is it local or federal?

  • Okay, could you tell me--can you tell me what

  • the 5-20 rule is?

  • I don't know.

  • The 5-20 rule? Mm-hmm.

  • Is it something about five fruits and vegetables every day?

  • Where is everyone?

  • I don't know.

  • Can you tell me what the 5-20 rule is?

  • What is it about?

  • It has something to do with nutrition.

  • Does anything come to mind?

  • The 5-20.