Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • My name is Marty.

  • I'm an actor, and I have an audition in 24 hours where I have to do a Boston accent.

  • I think I might need a little help.

  • I tracked down Page Clements.

  • Who?

  • The professional dialect coach here in New York City.

  • And hopefully she can help me master my Boston accent for today's audition.

  • So I have come to you because I need a little help.

  • Wonderful.

  • I have an audition coming up and I need to master a Boston accent.

  • When is your audition?

  • Today.

  • Okay.

  • All right.

  • Yeah, really?

  • To master an accent, you would practice for anywhere from 3 to 4 to five weeks.

  • But we will work with what you have, and I will get you as close to it is possible.

  • Okay.

  • Within the time constraint.

  • Yeah.

  • I've just been wicked distracted lately between the love of my life moving away in my on shop closing.

  • I've got no idea what's next, but if this game gets rains out, I'm gonna go down to the Paki for some beers.

  • You see, if Ricky's around, I can't sit around this house anymore.

  • There's too many memories.

  • You quite the actor Marti.

  • So here's what I want you to do.

  • First of all, take a back step from actually trying to do any acting connection.

  • I would say this to anybody, whether your audition is in five hours or five weeks.

  • Choose a person.

  • Okay to listen to, we're gonna watch a scene.

  • Matt Damon is coming up.

  • He's very consistent.

  • Listen, moxie.

  • Convinced of that till next month when you get to James Lemon, then you're gonna be talking about how the economies of the economy here, that the economy's economy, economy, economies and he's very natural with this.

  • He's not showing his accent how the economies of Virginia and Pennsylvania were entrepreneurial and capitalist way back in 17 40 c 17 40.

  • He's got an upward inflection.

  • Very important thing to do that you don't repeat every sentence with a falling inflection.

  • So you're not dropping the ends like that.

  • Okay, here's what I want to say instead of Here's what I want to say.

  • I want to finish the thought out here way back in 17 40 17 40 17 40.

  • So he's got that upward in election.

  • This guy's like a duck.

  • I think we got a storm coming in.

  • Massive is gonna be a parking lot.

  • Don't drop.

  • That could be a parking lot.

  • Yeah.

  • Okay, Okay.

  • Doesn't mean that every single thought has to be up.

  • I just want you to be mindful that the habit, especially for the average American, is to drop it down.

  • And that's how you could use an actor or anybody to help you break it down.

  • Right?

  • But if you watched the departed, you've got really good accent work.

  • And so so accent work.

  • We have a blind spot.

  • Why do we have a blind spot here?

  • The difference between the usage of the word spot.

  • Blind spot, He went spot.

  • Spot, spot?

  • Yeah.

  • Do you hear that?

  • Yeah.

  • Okay, so it was.

  • Write him any calls?

  • They turned off their cellphones, search randomly for calls made from the area.

  • 807 phones alive in this area.

  • The narrow the area, would you see there for service is what you're gonna get.

  • Why the fuck did they turn their phones off?

  • All these guys speaking, right.

  • And then all of a sudden, Mark Wahlberg walks in and his accent's perfect again.

  • Not that every single human being in a film or play has to sound exactly like so choosing one person instead of trying to listen to five different people.

  • If you're going, I'm going to sound like Mark.

  • We'll put the fucking cameras in this place.

  • Then he's gonna be the one to help you with the fucker.

  • You I'm the guy who does his job.

  • You must be the other guy.

  • A lot of accents are housed primarily in one area.

  • Boston has a little bit of forward and up almost into the mask.

  • That's why some people sound a little bit more nasal.

  • There's a lot of lateral sounds, so that's where we're going to start.

  • I want you to think of the ass sound, which makes your lips feel very flat, horizontal relaxed.

  • And the resignation of the vowel is in the front of your mouth.

  • So it's gonna feel right here around your lips.

  • Specifically Southie, which is what they were gonna go for.

  • Is the ad in Pat So it's just say that word, Pat.

  • Pat.

  • Now say, man, Man, What you did was actually terrific already for Boston.

  • In the word man, you've got to nasal continents.

  • You've got an M and an end and normally with the Southie accent that a sound becomes nasal prior to an ember.

  • And then you say these words with me say mass Mass Pat, Pat man man Cat, cat.

  • Ask, ask task task Packing, Packing.

  • What do you think Jackie is?

  • I know it is believed A liquor store.

  • The liquor store.

  • Okay, be careful.

  • I just noticed something you did.

  • This happens when you first start.

  • You could add like a physical.

  • Almost articulation.

  • Campbell, you don't go Paki because then your audition mate like that.

  • You wonder why you're my shoulders a part of this pack.

  • Yeah.

  • Pat Mass Mass.

  • Have Packy Packy.

  • Let's go to a different sound.

  • So the next town would have a stew is we're going to switch from the front to the back of the mouth now.

  • Okay.

  • Okay.

  • The word on, on or off.

  • Honest God long Aw is a back vowel, So it's placed in the back of the mouth.

  • What Bostonians do specifically Southie is they treat this vowel as what we call a diff from now a diff long.

  • It's just a speech term.

  • A different song is simply a blending of two vowels.

  • Okay, if you move your tongue like it's sort of doing a little bit of a wave in there on, we're gonna have a lilt.

  • So listen to it instead of honest general American.

  • Honest, honest, honest, Honest to God, it's not honest to God, it's not.

  • Do you feel how you've not only changed the vowel?

  • You change the place in the mouth?

  • Yes.

  • Right on.

  • On coffee.

  • Coffee want Want?

  • What do you want?

  • What I want.

  • What do you want?

  • That's a dog want on dog want on?

  • I've got no idea what's next.

  • I've got no idea what's next.

  • What's next?

  • What's next in my on shop closing and my art shops Closing my aunt and my own shop shop I'm gonna go down to the Paki.

  • I'm gonna go down to the Packy Packy Packy for some beers and see if Ricky's around.

  • Good.

  • I can't sit around this house anymore.

  • There's too many memories like I hope it's not end of the day.

  • No, no, it can't be ready.

  • This sound.

  • Yeah, Okay.

  • This is a big one.

  • In the world of accents and dialects, you may hear the word row tick or non road IQ.

  • It's referring to whether or not we use ours or not in our vowels.

  • Okay, we have the word stir.

  • That's a vowel that has what is called our coloring, so that makes it ro tick.

  • Now people in Boston will round the lips a little bit, so the vowel feel more forward.

  • So instead of stir, stir stir.

  • Now, let's personal lips.

  • Let's see if we can find the sound a person person worth worth around your lips.

  • A little more are perfect.

  • Perfect.

  • I feel like I'm talking in a British accent.

  • Officer.

  • You're not British.

  • Perfect.

  • Perfect.

  • That's the stronger.

  • And what I mean by strong is is in the accented syllable of the word.

  • We have a week, especially when it's at the end of a word, like in Father sister brother theater in Boston.

  • We're gonna drop the are forgot about.

  • All right.

  • Say dinner, dinner theater, theater Father, Father, Sister, Sister.

  • I did it.

  • That was It s so when you see the word or you're not just saying vowel vowel, you're saying two vowels, two vowels.

  • Think about it, se or or yes, Good.

  • Okay, that's what it is.

  • a song is.

  • So what we want to do is make the second vowel.

  • I have no are coloring or or short.

  • So So you're relaxing the lips a little bit.

  • Dawson.

  • Just like a chill.

  • It's a little much year, of course, of course.

  • Short short.

  • Park Park, North North.

  • Start stop spots.

  • You're smart.

  • Thank you.

  • Work work Worth birth?

  • Certainly.

  • Certainly off course.

  • Orchard more, of course.

  • Ordered more.

  • There you go.

  • That's great.

  • Dinner theater, Father.

  • Dinner theater.

  • Father.

  • Father, Let's go to the patio under the dinner theater.

  • Let's go.

  • Purpose off.

  • Working on an accent over time is so that not only you feel more comfortable with it, but the truth of the sentence sounds more fluid.

  • You wanted to enhance the work, not be in the way of it.

  • Okay.

  • You want it to be putting on a costume, and we're not just looking at the costume because of the time element.

  • There are many more sounds that we could go over.

  • We've hit the stronger choices.

  • Okay?

  • I'm getting better.

  • Yeah, I think you are.

  • Yeah.

  • I might have something to do with that.

  • You feel like you're more prepared.

  • I feel like I am more prepared.

  • Yes, you're right.

  • Just been wicked distracted lately.

  • I've got no idea what's next.

  • I've got no idea what's next.

  • I've got no idea what's next in my on shop.

  • Closing on my own shops, closing my aunt shop closing.

  • I'm gonna go down to the Paki for some beers.

  • I'm gonna go down to the Paki for some beers and then go down to the Paki, grab some beers to remember Intention, breathing, inflection, all the sound changes and world peace.

  • Perfect.

  • Perfect.

  • But this game gets written for skin gets reamed out.

  • North Star North style locket.

  • Coffee pot.

  • The corporate coffee pot.

  • Yeah, just the wicked distracted lately.

  • Barney Miller.

  • So whenever you're ready, Okay.

  • Hi.

  • My name is Marty Miller, and I'll be reading for the role of Bobby Skies.

  • Wicked Doc, We got a storm coming in myself is gonna be a pocket gonna take forever to get the lands down.

  • Yeah, no, I just don't like it.

  • Distracted lately between the love of my life moving away and lie on shop closing.

  • I just got no idea what's next, But if the gang gets rings out, I'm gonna go down to the packing grabs and B is See if Ricky's around.

  • Maybe, you know, I just can't sit at home anymore.

  • Just too many memories.

  • Thanks.

  • We'll be in touch.

  • So I think you and I came here to see you and tell you that I love you.

  • Well, to be quite honest, because we're all very territorial about our accents and where we're from, I'm sure that if someone from this outside of Boston heard Marty do this accent, they would probably say it's not accurate.

  • But I think it's a little bit exaggerated now is all.

  • There was just 1/2 guessed it was.

  • He's put it on just trying too hard.

  • Now I'm thinking about how I'm telling you, ever since I saw you on the dunking, only there it is the word Saul needs to be a little bit more of, as I described to him saw, and he's just rounding it.

  • It could be slightly confused with New York when I start getting into a conversation with people.

  • Sometimes they think I'm from New York, and I said I was gonna be a pocket gonna take forever to get be insurmountable like plucking, want instead of pocket.

  • You could make a little bit more of a difference in pocket law.

  • They were a little too close together in shape and placement, and he starts a little bit fast.

  • But I think he gets better as it goes on.

  • I just don't get distracted lately, not attend.

  • I'd give the guy like a four, maybe five.

  • I think it needs a little bit of work.