Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I was about 10 years old

    10歳の時

  • on a camping trip with my dad

    父とキャンプに行きました

  • in the Adirondack Mountains, a wilderness area

    行き先は 手付かずの自然が広がる

  • in the northern part of New York State.

    NY州北部のアディロンダック山脈でした

  • It was a beautiful day.

    その日は素晴らしい日で

  • The forest was sparkling.

    森はキラキラ光り

  • The sun made the leaves glow like stained glass,

    太陽で木の葉はステンドグラスの様に輝き

  • and if it weren't for the path we were following,

    歩み行く道がなければ

  • we could almost pretend we were

    その土地に足を踏み入れたのは

  • the first human beings to ever walk that land.

    自分達が最初だと思えるほどでした

  • We got to our campsite.

    キャンプ場では

  • It was a lean-to on a bluff

    切り立った崖の上に簡素な小屋があり

  • looking over a crystal, beautiful lake,

    澄んだ美しい湖を見渡せましたが

  • when I discovered a horror.

    そこでぞっとする光景を目の当たりにしました

  • Behind the lean-to was a dump,

    小屋の後ろはゴミ捨て場になっており

  • maybe 40 feet square

    12㎡くらいの広さだったでしょうか

  • with rotting apple cores

    腐ったリンゴの芯

  • and balled-up aluminum foil,

    丸められたアルミフォイルや

  • and a dead sneaker.

    履かれなくなったスニーカーの片方が捨てられていました

  • And I was astonished,

    私は非常に驚き

  • I was very angry, and I was deeply confused.

    とても腹立たしくなり 深く感情が混乱しました

  • The campers who were too lazy

    キャンプ場に来た人達が怠慢で

  • to take out what they had brought in,

    持参品を持ち帰らなかったら

  • who did they think would clean up after them?

    誰が代わりに清掃してくれると思ったのでしょうか?

  • That question stayed with me,

    そんな疑問が頭に残りました

  • and it simplified a little.

    疑問はさらにシンブルな問いとなりました

  • Who cleans up after us?

    誰が私たちの代わりに清掃してくれるのでしょうか

  • However you configure

    「私たち」の定義がどうであれ

  • or wherever you place the us,

    「私たち」がどこにいようとも

  • who cleans up after us in Istanbul?

    私たちの代わりに誰がイスタンブールで清掃をしているのでしょうか

  • Who cleans up after us in Rio

    リオデジャネイロでは

  • or in Paris or in London?

    パリやロンドンでは 誰が清掃をしているのでしょうか

  • Here in New York,

    ここ ニューヨークでは

  • the Department of Sanitation cleans up after us,

    衛生局の人達が私たちの代わりに清掃をしています

  • to the tune of 11,000 tons of garbage

    1万1千トンもの大量のゴミと

  • and 2,000 tons of recyclables every day.

    2千トンの資源ごみを毎日回収しています

  • I wanted to get to know them as individuals.

    私は彼らについて知りたいと思いました

  • I wanted to understand who takes the job.

    清掃をしている人達を理解したいと思ったのです

  • What's it like to wear the uniform

    衛生局の制服を着て

  • and bear that burden?

    ゴミを回収するのはどのような感じなのでしょうか

  • So I started a research project with them.

    私は清掃作業員と一緒に調査を始めました

  • I rode in the trucks and walked the routes

    私は清掃トラックに同乗し 回収ルートを歩き

  • and interviewed people in offices and facilities

    町中のオフィス 施設で

  • all over the city,

    人々にインタビューをしました

  • and I learned a lot,

    私は多くのことを学びましたが

  • but I was still an outsider.

    それでもまだ部外者にしか過ぎません

  • I needed to go deeper.

    そこでもっと深く入り込みたいと思い

  • So I took the job as a sanitation worker.

    私は清掃職員の仕事に就きました

  • I didn't just ride in the trucks now. I drove the trucks.

    ただトラックに同乗するだけではなく 今ではトラックを運転します

  • And I operated the mechanical brooms and I plowed the snow.

    清掃機も操作しますし 除雪もしました

  • It was a remarkable privilege

    私にとってはかけがえのない体験でしたし

  • and an amazing education.

    多くのことを学ぶ機会となりました

  • Everyone asks about the smell.

    誰もがごみの臭いについて質問します

  • It's there, but it's not as prevalent as you think,

    もちろん臭いはありますが 皆さんが思うほどのものではありません

  • and on days when it is really bad,

    臭いが本当にひどい時でも

  • you get used to it rather quickly.

    割とすぐに慣れます

  • The weight takes a long time to get used to.

    慣れるのに時間がかかるのはゴミの重さです

  • I knew people who were several years on the job

    清掃員の職に就いて数年はたっている人達を知っていますが

  • whose bodies were still adjusting to the burden

    彼らは 未だにその負荷に苦戦しています

  • of bearing on your body

    体で支えて

  • tons of trash every week.

    毎週何トンものゴミを持ち運ぶ負担に

  • Then there's the danger.

    さらに そこには危険も伴います

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics,

    労働局の統計によると

  • sanitation work is one of the 10 most dangerous

    清掃作業はアメリカで最も危険な職業の

  • occupations in the country,

    トップ10の中に入っており

  • and I learned why.

    私もその理由が分かりました

  • You're in and out of traffic all day,

    清掃員はものすごいスピードで駆け抜ける交通の中へ

  • and it's zooming around you.

    一日中出入りしています

  • It just wants to get past you, so it's often

    清掃車を通り越そうとする時によくあることですが

  • the motorist is not paying attention.

    運転手は清掃員には注意を払ってくれません

  • That's really bad for the worker.

    これは彼らにとって非常に危険です

  • And then the garbage itself is full of hazards

    ゴミ自体も危険の塊で

  • that often fly back out of the truck

    トラックの後ろへ飛び出て

  • and do terrible harm.

    ひどい危害が及ぶこともあります

  • I also learned about the relentlessness of trash.

    私は ゴミは終わりがないことも知りました

  • When you step off the curb

    縁石から降りて

  • and you see a city from behind a truck,

    トラックを背にして街を見ると

  • you come to understand that trash

    ゴミはそれ自体 自然の力のようだと

  • is like a force of nature unto itself.

    思うようになります

  • It never stops coming.

    ゴミには一向に終わりがないのです

  • It's also like a form of respiration or circulation.

    まるで呼吸や血の循環のように

  • It must always be in motion.

    ゴミは常に動いているにちがいありません

  • And then there's the stigma.

    また 清掃員は侮辱も受けます

  • You put on the uniform, and you become invisible

    清掃員の制服を着て 特に意識されない存在となるのは

  • until someone is upset with you for whatever reason

    誰かが何らかの理由で彼らに腹を立てるまでです

  • like you've blocked traffic with your truck,

    例えば 清掃車が道をふさいでいたり

  • or you're taking a break too close to their home,

    清掃員が他人の家に近すぎる場所で休憩をしているとか

  • or you're drinking coffee in their diner,

    レストランでコーヒーを飲んでいても

  • and they will come and scorn you,

    清掃員のところにやって来て 罵ったり

  • and tell you that they don't want you anywhere near them.

    近くに寄らないで欲しいと言う人がいるのです

  • I find the stigma especially ironic,

    このような侮辱は特に皮肉なことだと思います

  • because I strongly believe that sanitation workers

    というのも 強く思うこととして 清掃作業員は

  • are the most important labor force

    道路における最も重要な労働力だという事です

  • on the streets of the city, for three reasons.

    その理由は3つあります

  • They are the first guardians of public health.

    清掃作業員は公衆衛生を第一線で守っています

  • If they're not taking away trash

    清掃作業員がゴミを毎日

  • efficiently and effectively every day,

    効率的 効果的に回収しなければ

  • it starts to spill out of its containments,

    ゴミ箱はあふれ始め

  • and the dangers inherent to it threaten us

    それが原因で引き起こさせる危険に

  • in very real ways.

    実際に脅かされることになります

  • Diseases we've had in check for decades and centuries

    何十年も何世紀も抑制されていた病気が

  • burst forth again and start to harm us.

    再び猛威を振るうようになります

  • The economy needs them.

    経済的に見ても清掃作業員は必要です

  • If we can't throw out the old stuff,

    古くなった物を捨てることができなければ

  • we have no room for the new stuff,

    新しい物を買う事が出来ません

  • so then the engines of the economy

    そうなると 消費が落ち込み

  • start to sputter when consumption is compromised.

    経済が回らなくなってしまいます

  • I'm not advocating capitalism, I'm just pointing out their relationship.

    私は資本主義的観点から述べているのではなく その関係性に着目してほしいのです

  • And then there's what I call

    それから いわゆる

  • our average, necessary quotidian velocity.

    平均的で 必要な日々のスピードというものがあります

  • By that I simply mean

    簡単に言うと

  • how fast we're used to moving

    この現代において いかに早く動くことに

  • in the contemporary day and age.

    慣れているかということです

  • We usually don't care for, repair, clean, carry around

    私たちは普段コーヒーカップ 買い物袋や

  • our coffee cup, our shopping bag,

    ペットボトルを気にかけて 修理したり 洗ったり

  • our bottle of water.

    持ち歩いたりしません

  • We use them, we throw them out, we forget about them,

    それらを使ったら 捨てるので その存在を忘れます

  • because we know there's a workforce

    というのも 私達は 掃除をしてくれる人が

  • on the other side that's going to take it all away.

    別にいることがわかっているからです

  • So I want to suggest today a couple of ways

    そこで今日は 清掃に対する

  • to think about sanitation that will perhaps help

    考え方をいくつか提案したいと思います

  • ameliorate the stigma

    それらが この問題の改善につながり

  • and bring them into this conversation

    持続可能で人間らしい街の作り方の話し合いに

  • of how to craft a city that is sustainable and humane.

    役に立つでしょう

  • Their work, I think, is kind of liturgical.

    清掃員の仕事はある意味 儀式のようなものだと思います

  • They're on the streets every day, rhythmically.

    彼らは 毎日決まった時間に街に出ます

  • They wear a uniform in many cities.

    多くの街で 彼らは制服を着用します

  • You know when to expect them.

    私達はいつ彼らが来るのか把握できます

  • And their work lets us do our work.

    彼らの仕事のおかけで 私達は自分の仕事ができます

  • They are almost a form of reassurance.

    彼らは安心させてくれる存在と言ってもいいでしょう

  • The flow that they maintain

    彼らの一連の作業で

  • keeps us safe from ourselves,

    私達自身や 街のゴミ 捨てられた物から

  • from our own dross, our cast-offs,

    私達は身を守られます

  • and that flow must be maintained always

    そして その流れは 常に 何があっても

  • no matter what.

    守らなければなりません

  • On the day after September 11 in 2001,

    2001年9月11日 あの日に

  • I heard the growl of a sanitation truck on the street,

    私は街で清掃車の音を耳にし

  • and I grabbed my infant son and I ran downstairs

    幼い息子を抱き 急いで階段を下りたところ

  • and there was a man doing his paper recycling route

    ある男性が紙の回収をしていました

  • like he did every Wednesday.

    毎週水曜日に彼がやっていることです

  • And I tried to thank him for doing his work

    あの日に一日中 仕事をしてくれていることに

  • on that day of all days,

    感謝しようとしました

  • but I started to cry.

    でも 涙が出てきたのです

  • And he looked at me,

    すると その人は私を見て

  • and he just nodded, and he said,

    うなずいて こう言いました

  • "We're going to be okay.

    「大丈夫だよ

  • We're going to be okay."

    きっと大丈夫だよ」

  • It was a little while later that I started

    その少し後に 私は清掃のリサーチを

  • my research with sanitation,

    始めました

  • and I met that man again.

    そして 私は再びあの時の清掃員にお会いしました

  • His name is Paulie, and we worked together many times,

    彼はポーリーという名前で 私達は何度も一緒に仕事をし

  • and we became good friends.

    良き友人になりました

  • I want to believe that Paulie was right.

    私はポーリーの言ったことが正しいと信じたいと思います

  • We are going to be okay.

    大丈夫だよ という事を

  • But in our effort to reconfigure

    この地球上で生きていく種として

  • how we as a species exist on this planet,

    私達が生き方を再設計するためには

  • we must include and take account of

    清掃員が仕事をする上で被る犠牲など

  • all the costs, including the very real human cost

    あらゆるコストを

  • of the labor.

    考慮しなければなりません

  • And we also would be well informed

    また 私達は清掃する人と触れ合う事で

  • to reach out to the people who do that work

    持続可能性なシステムをどのように考え

  • and get their expertise

    どのように作ればよいのか

  • on how do we think about,

    専門的な意見を聞くことで

  • how do we create systems around sustainability

    多くの情報が得られるでしょう

  • that perhaps take us from curbside recycling,

    道端で資源ゴミを回収する方法は

  • which is a remarkable success across 40 years,

    アメリカだけでなく世界中で 40年にわたり

  • across the United States and countries around the world,

    素晴らしい成果を上げてきましたが

  • and lift us up to a broader horizon

    製造の過程で または原材料から

  • where we're looking at other forms of waste

    排出されるゴミが削減されるような

  • that could be lessened

    今までとは違うタイプの新たな次元を

  • from manufacturing and industrial sources.

    見ることができるかもしれません

  • Municipal waste, what we think of when we talk about garbage,

    ゴミというと 町の生活ごみを思い浮かべますが

  • accounts for three percent of the nation's waste stream.

    それらは国のゴミの3%に相当します

  • It's a remarkable statistic.

    見過ごせない数字です

  • So in the flow of your days,

    皆さんが一日過ごす中で

  • in the flow of your lives,

    人生の中で

  • next time you see someone whose job is

    今度 皆さんの代わりに

  • to clean up after you,

    清掃をしてくれる人を見かけたら

  • take a moment to acknowledge them.

    一瞬立ち止まって その存在を確認してください

  • Take a moment to say thank you.

    一瞬の時間をとって お礼をいってください

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

I was about 10 years old

10歳の時

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED 清掃 ゴミ 回収 作業 トラック

TED】ニューヨークのゴミで発見したこと (【TED】What I discovered in New York City trash)

  • 6492 522
    VoiceTube に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語