Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • It can be hard to make rational sense of the world.

    合理的に考えるのは難しいかもしれません。

  • But is your brain your own worst enemy?

    しかし、あなたの脳はあなた自身の最悪の敵なのでしょうか?

  • Here are four of the many ways your brain's processing shortcuts

    ここでは、あなたの脳の処理のショートカットの多くの方法のうち、4つの方法を紹介します。

  • are playing tricks on you.

    いたずらをしている

  • Welcome to cognitive bias.

    認知バイアスへようこそ

  • Understanding a bit about it could change the way you see the world.

    それを少し理解することで、世界の見え方が変わるかもしれません。

  • So here goes.

    これがそうだ

  • A recent peer-reviewed scientific study found caffeine consumption

    最近の査読付き科学研究でカフェインの消費量が判明

  • is strongly linked with developing cancer.

    は、がんの発症と強く関連しています。

  • On this scale,

    この規模で

  • to what extent do you agree or disagree

    どの程度

  • with the findings of this study?

    この研究の結果と一致しますか?

  • Relax,

    リラックスして

  • this study is fake.

    この研究は偽物だ

  • However, your answer will be directly influenced

    しかし、あなたの答えは直接影響を受けることになります。

  • by the amount of caffeine you drink.

    飲むカフェインの量によって

  • Cognitive bias number one...

    認知バイアスナンバーワン...

  • Self-serving bias is your brain's

    自分勝手なバイアスは、あなたの脳の

  • strong natural tendency to interpret information in such a way as

    解釈力

  • to unduly favour itself.

    自分自身を不当に有利にするために。

  • In this experiment,

    この実験では

  • caffeine drinkers rated the study's validity consistently lower

    カフェイン摂取者は、この研究の妥当性を一貫して低く評価した。

  • than non-caffeine drinkers.

    ノンカフェインの人よりも

  • Subjects with a negative personal stake in the outcome of research

    研究の結果に個人的な利害関係が否定的な被験者

  • were less convinced by the data.

    は、データにあまり納得できませんでした。

  • How irrational.

    なんて非合理的なんだ

  • Your brain will reject perfectly viable information

    あなたの脳は完全に実行可能な情報を拒絶する

  • simply because it has negative implications

    弊害があるからといって

  • for your personal beliefs and behaviours.

    あなたの個人的な信念と行動のために

  • Likewise, it will tend to eagerly accept information

    同様に、情報を熱心に受け入れようとする傾向があります。

  • with positive implications,

    肯定的な意味合いで。

  • even if that information is flawed or inconclusive.

    たとえその情報に欠陥があったり、決定的ではないとしても。

  • So why does your brain do this?

    では、なぜあなたの脳はこんなことをするのでしょうか?

  • Self-serving bias protects one's fragile ego from threat and injury.

    利己的なバイアスは、自分の壊れやすい自我を脅しや怪我から守ってくれます。

  • That last group presentation you gave was either a success,

    最後のグループ発表は成功したのか?

  • thanks to your brilliant work.

    あなたの素晴らしい仕事に感謝します。

  • Or was a failure, thanks to everyone else.

    それとも失敗だったのか、みんなのおかげで。

  • You gotta look after that ego.

    その自我を大事にしないと

  • OK, a new thought experiment.

    OK、新しい思考実験。

  • Look at this parking.

    この駐車場を見てください。

  • What do you think of the red car's driver?

    赤い車の運転手さんはどう思いますか?

  • If you thought poorly of the driver's character,

    運転手の性格を悪く考えていたら

  • you have performed cognitive bias number two.

    あなたは認知バイアスの2番を実行しました。

  • This is your brain's attempt to explain behaviour

    これはあなたの脳が行動を説明しようとしている。

  • by placing undue emphasis on internal characteristics of the person,

    その人の内面的な特徴を過度に強調することによって。

  • rather than external factors.

    外的要因よりも

  • Consider that just moments ago,

    ついさっきのことを考えてみてください。

  • these cars were parked in a way

    これらの車は

  • that left the red car's driver with little option.

    赤い車の運転手にはほとんど選択肢がなかった。

  • Does that change your opinion?

    それはあなたの意見を変えるものですか?

  • Fundamental attribution error is often performed when driving.

    根本的な帰属誤差は、運転時によく行われます。

  • I'm speeding because I'm in a rush,

    焦っているからスピードを出している。

  • whereas, they're speeding because they're an inconsiderate maniac.

    一方、スピード違反をしているのは、彼らが無分別な狂人だからだ。

  • Your brain has limited capacity to interpret the world.

    あなたの脳は世界を解釈する能力に限界があります。

  • It can observe the badly parked car

    それはひどく駐車された車を観察することができます

  • and understand that someone put it there,

    と誰かが置いたことを理解しています。

  • but that's it.

    でも、それだけです。

  • To theorise about the historical arrangement of the cars,

    歴史的な車の配置を理論化すること。

  • or the situational needs of the driver

    またはドライバーの状況に応じたニーズ

  • is a complex and potentially unending use

    は、複雑で終わりのない使い方をする可能性があります。

  • of finite cognitive resources.

    限りある認知資源の

  • On to the next one.

    次の一本に移ろう

  • Here's a famous experiment by Peter Wason.

    ここにピーター・ワソンの有名な実験があります。

  • Play along at home.

    家で一緒に遊ぶ。

  • Subjects were given a three number sequence,

    被験者には3つの数字の羅列が与えられた。

  • told that it follows a simple rule, and asked to figure out the rule.

    簡単なルールに従っていることを伝え、ルールを把握するように求めました。

  • They were allowed to suggest their own number sequences

    彼らは自分の数列を提案することが許されていました

  • and told to continue until they were confident

    確信が持てるまで続けるように言われた

  • that they had cracked the rule.

    ルールを破ってしまったことを

  • Were you thinking of a sequence like this?

    このようなシーケンスを考えていたのですか?

  • This follows the rule.

    これはルールに従っています。

  • And another, something like this?

    もう一つは、こんな感じ?

  • This also follows the rule.

    これもルールに従っています。

  • So, what is the rule?

    では、そのルールとは何か?

  • It's to multiply by two, right?

    2倍にすることですよね?

  • Well...no.

    いや...

  • Your brain just performed another cognitive bias,

    あなたの脳は、別の認知バイアスを実行しました。

  • The actual rules is any sequence of numbers in ascending order.

    実際のルールは、昇順の任意の数字の列です。

  • So what went wrong?

    で、何が悪かったの?

  • Your brain landed on its first hypothesis, multiply by two,

    君の脳は最初の仮説に着地したんだ 2倍にして

  • from there, every suggested number sequence was used

    そこから、提案されたすべての数列が使用されました。

  • to confirm that initial hypothesis rather than actually test it.

    実際に検証するのではなく、その初期仮説を確認するために

  • A rational approach would be to attempt to disprove this hypothesis

    合理的なアプローチは、この仮説を反証しようとすることである。

  • by suggesting other number sequences that didn't follow it.

    それに従わない他の数列を提案することで

  • But, your brain isn't rational.

    でも、あなたの脳は合理的ではありません。

  • It has a tendency to search for, interpret, favour and recall

    それは、検索、解釈、好意、リコールの傾向があります。

  • information that confirms its pre-existing beliefs,

    既成の信念を確認するための情報を提供します。

  • numbers or otherwise.

    数字があるかどうかで判断してください。

  • Confirmation bias is based on limitations

    確認バイアスは限界に基づいている

  • in the brain's ability to handle complex tasks,

    複雑なタスクを処理する脳の能力において

  • and the shortcuts that it uses as a result.

    と、その結果として使用されるショートカットがあります。

  • The brain finds it really difficult

    脳はそれを本当に難しいと思っている

  • to test alternative hypotheses in parallel.

    を使って、代替仮説を並行して検証することができます。

  • It's good, but it's not that good.

    美味しいんだけど、そこまでではない。

  • OK,

    いいわよ

  • so you've learnt a few cognitive biases,

    認知バイアスを学んだのね

  • you're now prepared to combat them in your own brain.

    あなたは今、自分の脳内でそれらと戦う準備ができています。

  • After all, knowing is half the battle, right?

    結局のところ、知ることは戦いの半分ではないでしょうか?

  • Well, not exactly.

    そうとは言えないけど

  • That's cognitive bias number four.

    それは認知バイアスの4番です。

  • The action figure and TV character, G.I. Joe,

    アクションフィギュア、テレビキャラクターのG.I.ジョー。

  • famously said, "Knowing is half the battle."

    "知ることは戦いの半分である "と言った

  • When it comes to cognitive bias, he was well out.

    認知バイアスに関して言えば、彼はよく出ていた。

  • Knowing is one thing,

    知ることは一つです。

  • but habits, situations and other processes still rule the roost.

    しかし、習慣や状況、その他のプロセスは依然としてねぐらを支配しています。

  • Self-awareness wont beat it.

    自己認識はそれに勝てません。

  • You may know a badly parked car does not make a bad person,

    下手に駐車した車が悪者になるわけではないことを知っているかもしれません。

  • but you'll still feel negatively towards them.

    と言っても、相手に対してネガティブな感情を抱くことになります。

  • You may know your brain will take shortcuts to confirm the hypotheses

    仮説を確認するために脳が近道をすることを知っているかもしれませんが

  • it already holds,

    それはすでに保持しています。

  • but it will still take those shortcuts.

    しかし、それはまだそれらのショートカットを取るでしょう。

  • You may know that your brain will protect your ego at every turn,

    自分の脳があらゆる場面で自分のエゴを守ってくれることを知っているかもしれません。

  • but the ego security will still be out in force.

    しかし、自我の安全保障は、まだ力を発揮するでしょう。

  • So knowing about cognitive biases is way less than half the battle.

    だから認知バイアスを知ることは戦いの半分以下なんだよ

  • Even knowing the G.I. Joe fallacy about knowing about cognitive biases,

    認知バイアスを知っているというG.I.ジョーの誤謬を知っていても

  • is still way less than half the battle.

    はまだ半分以下の戦いです。

  • Funny how your brain can pontificate about its own limitations

    お前の脳みそが自分の限界を独り言で語るのはおかしい

  • but do almost nothing about them.

    しかし、それらについてはほとんど何もしない。

  • But, in the true spirit of cognitive bias

    しかし、認知バイアスの真の精神では

  • you will be able to point it out in others.

    他の人にも指摘できるようになります。

It can be hard to make rational sense of the world.

合理的に考えるのは難しいかもしれません。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

B1 中級 日本語 バイアス 仮説 ルール 数列 ショートカット 合理

あなたの脳があなたの上にトリックを果たしている4つの方法|BBCのアイデア

  • 3082 59
    Tracy Wang   に公開 2020 年 02 月 19 日
動画の中の単語

前のバージョンに戻す