Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • Hello, and welcome to "6 Minute English".

    こんにちは。「6 Minute English」へようこそ。

  • I'm Neil.

    僕はニールです。

  • And I'm Dan.

    そして、僕はダン。

  • Now then, Dan, do you ever feel awkward?

    ねえ、ダン。君は「askward = 気まずい」という気分になったことがある?

  • Awkward?

    「awkward = 気まずい」?

  • Yes, feeling uncomfortable, embarrassed or self-conscious in a social situation where something isn't quite right.

    うん。社会的状況で、不快な気分になったり恥ずかしかったり、自意識過剰になってたりという、なんだか何かが間違ってるような感じのことだよ。

  • Mmm... sometimes.

    うーん・・・時々。

  • I remember always feeling very awkward watching TV with my parents if there was an explicit love scene.

    そういえば、親とテレビを見ていて露骨なラブシーンがあったときには、いつも「awkward = 気まずい」という気分になっていたね。

  • You know, people canoodling.

    ほら、抱き合ってるシーンとか。

  • Oh yes, me too!

    ああ、僕もだよ!

  • And that feeling of awkwardness is what we are looking at in today's 6 Minute English, and how it is all connected to social rules.

    その「awkwardness = 気まずさ」という気分が、今日の 6 Minute English のテーマなんだ。それから、その気分がどう社会的ルールに関係しているかもね。

  • "Social rules" are the unspoken rules which we follow in everyday life, the way we interact with other people and particularly with strangers.

    「社会的ルール」とは、僕たちが日常生活で従っている暗黙のルールのことで、他の人たち、特に知らない人たちと交流するときの方法のことだ。

  • Yes, for example, if you're waiting at a bus stop, it's okay to talk about the weather to a stranger.

    うん。例えば、バス停で待っているときに見知らぬ人と天気の話はしてもいい。

  • But it would be very awkward if you broke that social rule by asking them about, oh I don't know, how much money they earned.

    でも、もしその社会的ルールを破って、見知らぬ人たちに・・・そうだな・・・「いくら稼いでる?」なんて聞いたら気まずいよね。

  • Oh yes, that would be wrong, wouldn't it?

    うん、それは間違っているよね。

  • And we'll find out about another awkward situation on the underground railway later in the programme.

    この番組の中で、あとからもう 1 つ地下鉄での「気まずいシチュエーション」を紹介します。

  • Before that though, a quiz.

    その前に、クイズを 1 つ。

  • Which city has the oldest underground railway?

    一番古い地下鉄のある都市はどこでしょう?

  • Is it a) London b) New York or c) Tokyo?

    A:ロンドン、B:ニューヨーク、C:東京?

  • Aha! Well, I'm pretty confident about this!

    わかった!これについては、かなり自信があるよ!

  • I think it's London.

    ロンドンだと思う。

  • Well, I'll have the answer later in the programme.

    その答えについては、この番組中にわかるよ。

  • Dr. Raj Persuad is a psychologist.

    ラージ・ペルソー博士は心理学者だ。

  • He was a guest on the BBC radio programme "Seriously".

    彼は BBC のラジオ番組「Seriously」のゲストだった。

  • He was talking about social rules.

    彼は社会的ルールについて話していた。

  • How does he say they affect our lives?

    彼は社会的ルールがどう僕たちの生活に影響があると言ったのだろう?

  • How do we understand what the implicit social rules are that govern our behaviour?

    私たちの行動に影響している暗黙の社会的ルールが何かを、私たちはどう理解しているのでしょう?

  • They're so implicit.

    それはとても暗黙的です。

  • They're so almost invisible yet we all obey them.

    それはほとんど見えないにも関わらず、私たちはそれに従っています。

  • I.e., they're massively powerful that the only way to get at them, because you couldn't use an MRI brain scanner or a microscope

    言い換えると、それは非常に強力で、そうすることが社会的ルールを理解するための唯一の方法なのです。MRI を使って脳スキャンをしたり、顕微鏡を使ったりはできませんから。

  • What's the tool you would use to illuminate the social rules actually govern our lives?

    私たちの生活を支配している社会的ルールを理解するための方法とはなんでしょうか?

  • How do they affect our lives?

    それはどのように僕たちの生活に影響しているのだろう?

  • He says that they govern our behaviour, they govern our lives.

    彼は社会的ルールは、僕たちの行動や生活を支配していると言っている。

  • This means that they 'control' our lives.

    それは、社会的ルールが僕たちの生活を管理しているということだ。

  • They 'rule' our lives.

    それは僕たちの生活を「支配」している。

  • What's interesting is he says these social rules are 'implicit'.

    興味深いのは、彼は社会的ルールが暗黙的だと言っている点だね。

  • They are not written down anywhere.

    社会的ルールはどこにも書き記されていない。

  • They are unspoken but understood.

    語られることはないのに、理解されているね。

  • If they are unspoken and not written down, how can scientists and sociologists study them?

    でも、それが語られていなくて、書き記されてもいないなら、科学者や社会学者たちはどうやってそれについて研究しているのだろう?

  • How can they find out about them?

    彼らはどうやって、社会的ルールについて知ることができるのだろう?

  • They need a way to illuminate the rules.

    彼らにはそのルールを明らかにする方法が必要だ。

  • This means a way of shining a light on them to see what they are.

    つまり、社会的ルールが何なのかを照らし出す方法ことだ。

  • Here's Dr. Persaud again.

    ペルソー博士の言葉を再び紹介しよう。

  • How do we understand what the implicit social rules are that govern our behaviour?

    私たちは私たちの行動を支配している暗黙の社会的ルールが何であるか、どう理解しているのでしょうか。

  • They're so implicit.

    それはとても暗黙的です。

  • They're so almost invisible yet we all obey them.

    それはほとんど見えないにも関わらず、私たちはそれに従っています。

  • I.e., they're massively powerful that the only way to get at them, because you couldn't use an MRI brain scanner or a microscope

    言い換えると、それは非常に強力で、そうすることが社会的ルールを理解するための唯一の方法なのです。MRIを使って脳スキャンをしたり、顕微鏡を使ったりはできませんから。

  • What's the tool you would use to illuminate the social rules actually govern our lives?

    私たちの生活を支配している社会的ルールを理解するための方法とはなんでしょうか?

  • One way to find out about a rule is to break it.

    そのルールを見つけるための方法は、ルールを破ることだ。

  • Another word for 'break' when we're talking about rules is 'breach' and breaching experiments were used to learn about social rules.

    ルールを「破る」ことを他の言い方に言い換えると「違背(違反)」だね。そして「違背実験」が、社会的ルールを学ぶために使われたんだ。

  • Here's Dr. Persaud describing one of those experiments.

    ペルソー博士がその実験について説明しているのを紹介しよう。

  • You breached the social rule on purpose.

    わざと社会的ルールに背きます。

  • So a classic one - people would go into the Metro, the underground railwayTubeand there'd be only one person sitting in a carriage.

    たとえば典型的な例を挙げると、地下鉄に乗ったときにその車両に 1 人しか乗っていなかったとします。

  • You would go and sit next to that person.

    そして、その 1 人の乗客の隣に座るのです。

  • And if that led to awkwardness or discomfort, where the person got off the tube stop immediately, you had discovered a social rule.

    そして、もしそれが気まずさや居心地の悪さに繋がり、地下鉄が止まった瞬間に最初に乗っていた乗客が降りたら、社会的ルールを発見できたということです。

  • So, what was the experiment?

    さて、何が実験だったのかな?

  • Well, quite simply, find a nearly empty train carriage and then go and sit right next to someone rather than a distance away.

    えー、シンプルに言うと、ほぼ空っぽの車両を見つけて、その車両にいる乗客と距離を離れて座るんじゃなくて、隣に座る。

  • If that person then feels uncomfortable or awkward, and that's something you can tell by watching their behaviour.

    もし乗客が居心地悪く感じたり、気まずく感じているなら、その人の行動を見ていればわかるということだ。

  • For example, do they change seat, move carriage or get off the train completely?

    たとえば、彼らは席を変えたり、車両を変えたり、電車から完璧に降りてしまったりするだろう。

  • If they do, then you know you've discovered a rule.

    もし彼らがそうしたら、社会的ルールを発見できたということだ。

  • So you find a rule by breaking it or breaching it.

    つまり、社会的ルールはルールを破ったり、ルールに背くことで見つけられるんだね。

  • OK, time to review our vocabulary, but first, let's have the answer to the quiz question.

    さて、語彙の確認の時間だよ。でもその前に、クイズの答えからみてみよう。

  • I asked which city has the oldest underground railway.

    僕は、一番古い地下鉄のある都市はどこか聞いたよね。

  • Is it a) London b) New York and c) Tokyo?

    A:ロンドン、B:ニューヨーク、C:東京?

  • Dan, you were pretty confident.

    ダン、君はとても自信があったね。

  • I was! I said London, but...now I'm having second thoughts.

    うん。僕はロンドンと言った。でも、今考え直しているとこだよ。

  • I think it might be New York.

    ニューヨークかもしれないと思っている。

  • Oh

    え・・・

  • That's a little bit awkward, isn't it?

    これはちょっと気まずいね。

  • Well, it is London, so I don't know if you're right or wrong!

    答えはロンドンだ。だから、君が正解なのか間違ってるのか言いづらいよ!

  • I feel a bit uncomfortable now.

    僕はちょっと今居心地が悪く感じているよ。

  • The facts are that London opened in 1863.

    ロンドンの地下鉄は 1863 年に開業したんだ。

  • New York was 1904 and Tokyo, 1927.

    ニューヨークは 1904 年、東京は 1927 年。

  • Well done, and extra bonus points if you knew any of those dates.

    もしこのいずれかの年まで知ってたなら、ボーナスポイントだよ。

  • Now it's time for our vocabulary.

    さて、じゃあ語彙の確認をはじめよう。

  • I hope it doesn't make you feel awkward, but can you start, Dan?

    君が気まずい気分にならないといいんだけど。ダン、はじめてもいいかな?

  • Of course!

    もちろん!

  • And the adjective 'awkward', and its noun 'awkwardness', are on our list for today.

    形容詞「awkward(気まずい)」と、その名詞「awkwardness(気まずさ)」は、今日のリストに載っているよ。

  • They mean 'an uncomfortable feeling in a social situation'.

    それらは、社会的な状況で感じる居心地悪い感じのことだ。

  • This is all connected with the idea of social rulesunspoken, but well-known rules which we follow in daily life to avoid awkward situations.

    これは社会的ルール・・・「語られることはなくても、よく知られていて、気まずい状況を避けるために僕たちが日常で従っているルール」に関連している。

  • The rules, as Neil said, are not spoken and they are not written down but we know them and understand them.

    ニールが言っているように、そのルールは語られることはなく、書き記されてもいない。でも、僕たちはそれを知っていて、理解しているんだ。

  • They are 'implicit'.

    それらは暗黙的。

  • And these implicit rules govern our lives.

    そしてその暗黙のルールが、僕たちの生活を「govern = 支配」している。

  • The verb 'govern' means to 'control and rule'.

    「govern = 支配する」という動詞は、「コントロール」や「支配」という意味だ。

  • To see something clearly, either in reality or metaphorically, you need to put some light on it.

    現実的にも、比喩的にも、何かをはっきり見るためにはそこに光を当てなければならない。

  • You need illuminate it.

    「illuminate = 照らす」ということだ。

  • And that was the next of our words, the verb 'illuminate'.

    そして、これが次の僕たちの語彙。動詞「illuminate = 照らす・明らかにする」。

  • And finally we had a word which means, when we're talking about rules, the same as break, to 'breach'.

    そして最後にもう 1 つ。ルールについて話しているときに、「破る」と同じ意味だと言った「breach = 違反・違背する」。

  • In experiments, they breached the rules to learn more about them.

    実験では、ルールに背くことでルールについて深く学んでいたね。

  • Well, we don't want to breach any rules so it's time for us to leave you for today.

    僕たちはルールに背きたくないから、そろそろお別れの時間だ。

  • But don't worry we will be back.

    でも、心配しないで。また帰ってきます。

  • In the meantime, you can find us in all the usual places online and on social media, just look for BBC Learning English.

    それまでの間は、ソーシャルメディア上などの BBC ラーニングイングリッシュで会いましょう。

  • Bye for now.

    またね。

  • Bye-bye!

    バイバイ!

Hello, and welcome to "6 Minute English".

こんにちは。「6 Minute English」へようこそ。

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 ルール 社会 暗黙 気まずい 地下鉄 支配

【BBC】気まずくなるのはなぜ? (Why do we feel awkward? - 6 Minute English)

  • 21871 740
    Annie Huang に公開 2020 年 03 月 12 日
動画の中の単語