Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • You all look the same.” “Let me guess, your name is Singh?”

  • “I like you hat.” Er, if you don't mind, it's a turban.

  • Oi, go back home.” What to South East London mate?

  • Um, yeah?

  • “I like your hat.” “Rag-head or like egg head.”

  • Have you had an accident? It looks like you have a bandage on.”

  • It's a turban, and it comes in different styles, it comes in different colours.

  • What's under you turban?” Thinking that it's something magical under

  • there, like I've got an extra brain or something. If you see someone with a turban you instantly

  • know he's a Sikh, like there's no denying it.

  • Well you can't buy one of these, for starters. It's practice.

  • People just think you get it and just put it on your head.

  • And there's an actual...there's a finesse, there's a process, there's an art.

  • There's an art to tying the turban. It's basically like a piece of cloth that's

  • on this table, and it's a bit longer, it wraps around my head three times.

  • I have many different types of turban underneath this. It's like Russian Dolls, when you

  • take one out there's another one, you take one out there is another one.

  • It's a symbol, it's my crown, it's my identity.

  • Repping. Repping the paag anyway.

  • Repping my tradition. I look good in it anyway.

  • Exactly. Don't worry about it.

  • Can you sing, Singh?” Yeah, ama-Singh-ly.

  • The middle name Singh was given by the 10th Guru to all the guys.

  • I'm a female Sikh, so I'm a Kaur. Because I've not got Kaur in my name, they're

  • like, “But you're not really Sikh then.” Every white guy has an Indian friend and they

  • get really excited when they meet you, be like, “Oh I know an Indian guy. His name

  • is so and so, you must know him.” “Do you know Jagpal? Do you know Jagpal?”

  • Yeah we go back in like Africa. No we don't. No we don't.

  • You'd always wait for your name on the register and you'd just wait for that teacher to

  • pronounce it wrong. They'll be like, “John?” Yeah, “James?”

  • Yeah, “Patrick?” Yeah. And then AmYou can see them struggling, they're like,

  • Karamvir” , genuinely trying to, they're really trying as well.

  • It's the commitment to get it out. I was like, oh I signed my name, you know

  • Poonam. And she was like, by the end of walking me around, she was like, “It was really

  • great to meet you Susan.” And I was thinking, “Who the fuck is Susan?”

  • Are you Muslim?” I get this a lot.

  • Are you though? Are you Muslim?” No.

  • They don't understand that there are different types of brown people.

  • Yeah. When you do tell them, “I'm Muslim, I'm

  • not Sikh.” They're like, “Oh ok,” Like they get sort of relieved, likeOh

  • thank God you're not a Muslim.” That is, I find that really offensive.

  • Because there are similarities in both religions, but obviously there is a big difference in

  • how we live our lives to a certain extent. Everything post, you know, all those events,

  • we've also taken that on, because people presume we're Muslim, we get that abuse

  • as well as Muslim people. But then I think when it comes to that point,

  • is when people start saying, “Are you Muslim?” I say no. They say, “Are you sure?”

  • And I'm a bit like, “Erm… I don't know last time I checked.” At home, my Mum

  • told me this morning, “You're Sikh, have a good day.”

  • You all look the same.” Well clearly not, because, because you know

  • We don't. I've had other Sikhs telling me we all look

  • the same. And it's when people use it as a way of

  • you know like, apologising as a get out. So if they've said, “Oh I thought you were

  • Muslim. Oh no sorry, it's just because you all look the same.”

  • People always say to me, “Oh you really look like that girl from 'Goodness Gracious

  • Me'.” It doesn't matter who you are or where you're

  • from, you want to be like you, you don't want to be like, your cousin, your brother,

  • or like someone else that wears a turban and a beard, it's like no.

  • Not every Sikh looks like that, you get girls obviously that have long hair, short hair.

  • The whole idea of having a turban and a beard and having this kind of identity was to look

  • different was to stand out the crowd. I think that's my favourite thing about

  • Sikhism, it doesn't matter what gender you are, or what kind of background you're from,

  • everyone is equal. So My family has never differentiated me,

  • if i ever get into a fight, they're not like, “Don't you're a girl.” My grandad

  • was like, “Did you smack him in the face or not?” and I was like, “Yes I did.”

  • Good on you.

  • You smell like curry.” Yeah and what? And what?

  • I eat that. You eat it don't you?

  • You don't always smell like curry. Obviously you're going to smell like what you cook

  • in your house. You know what, it's really funny, growing

  • up, you were always aware, When your Mum is making a dish at home and there's a strong

  • smell and you had to go out. And you're like spraying everything on you, because you

  • don't want to be a stink. And you know when you smell it on the train

  • and you think, “Oh that's me! Is that me? No that's not me.” I smell like Gucci

  • Guilty or something, it's the person over there.

  • And actually curry is great. Yeah, it's like Britain's number one dish

  • for take away. Yeah.

  • I think curry smells like. I mean I like a good curry, I don't go to

  • a curry house or whatever. No you can't beat traditional cooked Indian

  • food. I think if you walk passed a chippy it smells

  • great, or whatever food it is. Yeah.

  • But it's definitely the smell of our culture and of our heritage.

  • And we're proud of it!

  • But I was born here, so this is my country. I don't know how many other ways we can

  • say this, I'm from Birmingham, born and raised, this is my county.

  • You take it for granted, they do mean, “Go back to India.” It;s just like

  • I don't want to. Yeah I want to stay here.

  • I don't want to, I'm alright here thanks. I love this country.

  • So people will come up to me and they'll say, “Oh where are you from?”

  • And I'll say, “Oh, from the midlands.” “Yeah, but where are you actually from?

  • Where are you really from?” “No, no, no, no, where are you from?”

  • Birmingham, England. And it's such a beautiful culture, the food,

  • the clothes, you know, there's so much to be proud of to be Asian in Britain today.

  • Also another thing that I love is our history. It's so deep and it's so rich and it's

  • beautiful. And as a woman, it is so empowering to know,

  • that even 200-250 years back, they were preaching men and women being completely equal.

  • You know, it's just another thing I love about that, being proud to rep that.

  • Rep that. I love that word in the end. Rep that!

  • Rep that!

You all look the same.” “Let me guess, your name is Singh?”

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

A2 初級

シーク教徒に言ってはいけないこと (Things Not To Say To Sikh People)

  • 35 0
    Amy.Lin に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語