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字幕表 動画を再生する

  • All of this kinda connects to this.

  • We added sound.

  • It's a silent movie.

  • This chart shows all the movies directed or produced by legendary director D.W.

  • Griffith in 1912.

  • He was a Hollywood titan, but most of his movies?

  • They were about the same length.

  • Around 15 minutes, with the exceptions topping out around a half hour long.

  • Now look at the run time for 1915's Birth of A Nation.

  • What happened there?

  • The reason movies changed from 15 minute trifles tofeatured attractions,” can be traced

  • to one silent movie.

  • It changed the game in a way that transformed all movies.

  • But it wasn't invented in Hollywood.

  • It came from 6,000 miles away.

  • This is a foothere you go metric people.

  • Early silent film historians actually talk about these movies in...feet.

  • And it makes sensethe same way that measuring tape comes on a reel, movies come on reels

  • too.

  • One reel of film is 1,000 feet, give or take.

  • That's 15 minutes or fewer, depending on what frame rate you play it back at.

  • In the early days of moviesthe 1900s — almost all movies were about 1,000 feet.

  • One reel.

  • 15 minutes or fewer.

  • These short movies were usually screened in variety shows or a smorgasbord of short films.

  • You'd drop into a Nickelodeon — a lower-class theatre where you'd see a bunch of movies

  • for a nickel — 5 cents.

  • You'd see Laura Comstock's Bag Punching Dog, followed by The Trapeze Disrobing Act,

  • followed by the first screen adaptation of Frankenstein.

  • The whole thing was 14 minutes long - 975 feet.

  • In America, some of this was enforced by East Coast movie trusts that controlled and licensed

  • movie patents for film and projection.

  • They preferred single and double reel films.

  • But even renegade filmmakers out in Hollywood kept movies pretty short.

  • And, with some exceptions, so did filmmakers across Europe.

  • It was just easier to transport and project one-reel films.

  • That chart, from the beginning?

  • It's not a chart of time, but feet.

  • And this right here is a thousand feet - that one reel cutoff.

  • For the most part, movies were...small.

  • Until the Italians thought bigger.

  • Italian movies were becoming spectacles in the 1900s.

  • They were breaking out of the standard 15-minute short, and trying new things.

  • By being outside the American system of high-powered movie trusts, one film in particular was able

  • to rewrite the rules.

  • That's 1913's Quo Vadisan epic story of Romans in the time of Nero.

  • To tell that story the Italian filmmakers took 2 whole hours - not 15 minutes.

  • It was 8,000 feet long!

  • To get people to see it, Quo Vadis's promoters needed to invent a new business model.

  • Instead of trying to force the long movie into those movie theaters playing a bunch

  • of one-reel shorts, promoters rented out classy concert halls for Quo Vadis alone.

  • They did the same in the US, at the Astor Theatre in New York, and playing themammoth

  • photodramaeverywhere from Arkansas to the future state of Hawaii.

  • To draw crowds from nickelodeons into those big halls to watch just one really long thing,

  • Quo Vadis needed to be special.

  • It used real Roman locations, thousands of extras, and the first big stunts - like chariot

  • races where the actors rode real chariots and gladiatorial battles with big hits and

  • realistic weapons.

  • The posters sold the spectacleand sold out seats.

  • And people noticed.

  • In the years following the release of Quo Vadis, DW Griffith, increased the length of

  • his own movies.

  • Quo Vadis and other Italian epics were proof that big movies could work.

  • Griffith's movies likeJudith of Bethuliacrept into feature film lengths - 61 minutes,

  • a full 4 reels.

  • He released Birth of a Nation in 1915.

  • It was sold as themightiest spectacle ever produced” — and a long one clocking

  • in at 12 reels.

  • It had big stunts too, like many big battle scenes.

  • Now this movie was so controversial that people called it racist in 1915.

  • I mean, the KKK are the good guys.

  • But despite that, it brought the spectacle of Quo Vadis to Hollywood.

  • The trusts that wanted to keep movies short were already fading.

  • The public's love of long movies finished the job.

  • Birth of a Nation solidified single movies as a style worth funding and paying for.

  • And even though today, we don't measure movies in feet, Quo Vadis is not a relic.

  • This chart shows average movie times for the most popular 25 movies each year, from 1930

  • on.

  • This time here?

  • It's 2013, 100 years after the 120 minute Quo Vadis came out.

  • The running time?

  • 121.4 minutes.

  • This edition of Almanac's all about big changes to the movies that came from outside

  • Hollywood, and there are a ton of other business model changes like Quo Vadis, so let me know

  • some of the ones that you've heard about in the comments.

  • However, I wanna just prove to you one more time that Quo Vadis really was a huge hit.

  • This is an ad forWhen Ursus Threw the Bull,” a parody movie that was made in response

  • to Quo Vadis's enormous success.

All of this kinda connects to this.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B2 中上級

映画が15分から2時間になった理由 (Why movies went from 15 minutes to 2 hours)

  • 38 1
    Mackenzie に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語