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  • Hey, Vsauce.

  • Michael here. And the year 6009

  • will be the very first year since 1961 that a year

  • when written in Hindu-Arabic numerals can be inverted

  • and still look the same. But you and I

  • probably won't live long enough to enjoy the year six thousand

  • and nine. Human lives just aren't long enough.

  • We will miss out on that. What other cool future offense will we be

  • missing? Well, first of all,

  • you and I will probably be gone before the completion of the time

  • pyramid in Wemding, Germany. It will eventually be a pile of

  • 120 concrete blocks. But the builders

  • are only adding one block every 10 years.

  • Since beginning in 1993 they've added

  • only the first three. At this rate the pyramid will be completed in the year

  • 3183.

  • The final block placed by

  • our great great great great great great, more than 30 greats

  • grandchildren. But even they will miss

  • an opportunity to frolic and play safely in the Chernobyl

  • Exclusion Zone. The zone of

  • alienation, where radioactive contamination from the 1986 disaster

  • will remain at levels too high

  • for safe human activity until not the year 4000,

  • not the 5000, not the 6000. It will finally be safe

  • probably in the year 22 000.

  • Possibly within our lifetimes but definitely within the next one

  • million years,

  • stars like Betelgeuse and Eta Carinae

  • will explode in brilliant supernovas

  • visible from earth. I'm bummed I'm probably going to miss out on these

  • events because

  • for a few weeks it will look almost as if earth

  • has two Suns. Despite being hundreds, thousands of light-years away,

  • their supernovas will shine brighter than the full Moon

  • at night and be visible even during daytime.

  • But the real sky show comes in 3.75

  • billion years. Our galaxy

  • is full of stars, viewed from the surface of the earth

  • they look like little drops of milk in the sky,

  • which is why we call it the Milky Way Galaxy.

  • But all galaxies are named after

  • milk. Milk, lactose,

  • lactic, ga-lactic, galaxies.

  • And every drop of milk in the sky, every star that you can see,

  • is inside our galaxy, the Milky Way.

  • But there's a blurry distant

  • shape. This one. It's not a star, it's not a cloud of gas

  • in our galaxy, it is an entirely different

  • Galaxy - the Andromeda Galaxy and it's two-and-a-half

  • million light years away from our own. It contains twice as many stars as the

  • Milky Way

  • and it is coming our way. Headed toward us

  • at 300 kilometres a second, faster than a

  • bullet. Right now, the sky looks like this.

  • In 2 billion years Andromeda will have approached so closely

  • that people will look up at the sky and see

  • this. In 3.75 billion years the night sky will be like

  • a scene from a science fiction movie or an awesome desktop wallpaper.

  • Incredible and kind of scary.

  • After this scene, the sky will literally be glowing with the birth of new stars

  • as the Milky Way and Andromeda collide, mixing up into a brilliant cosmic

  • tie-dye. This simulation shows how Andromeda might collide with the Milky

  • Way,

  • but keep in mind that you are watching billions

  • of years pass every second. These galaxies

  • are moving fast but they're also huge

  • and covering even huger distances. They

  • will collide in the future but within the briefness

  • of a single human life they appear almost frozen,

  • unmoving. A couple billion years after colliding

  • the course of both galaxies will be married together

  • in a bright glowing centre. Earth, now

  • a stepchild to what was once Andromeda,

  • part of a new, bigger family called

  • Milkdromeda. It would be so cool to be alive to see our galaxy

  • colliding with another. But don't get all fomo,

  • consumed by a fear of missing

  • out. Because whatever life is around then will have plenty to envy us for.

  • They may have spectacular nightly views, but secretly wish they'd been born in

  • our time

  • to experience, say, the beginning of the Internet.

  • They will actually miss out on a lot of things.

  • Because the Moon moves one centimetre further away from

  • earth every year, 600 million years from today

  • the Moon will no longer be close enough to earth to completely

  • block out the Sun.

  • Future humans or descendants of humans will therefore

  • miss out on a chance to ever see for themselves

  • the beauty of the total solar eclipse from the surface of Earth.

  • Long before earth dries up

  • Niagara Falls will dry up. Well,

  • not the water part, but the falls part.

  • Every year the rushing water of Niagara erodes the rock at the top of the

  • falls

  • one foot backward. By the year 52 000

  • it will have eroded all the way to Lake Erie and our progeny will have no

  • Niagara Falls

  • to enjoy. Granite has an erosion rate of about

  • one inch per ten thousand years.

  • So, certainly by the year 7 million

  • Mount Rushmore, especially its faces, will no longer

  • exist. And because they slowly get

  • pulled in or rejected into space, in 50 to 100 million years

  • Saturn will no longer have its lovely rings.

  • So, life on earth in the future

  • might have awesome supernovas and galactic collisions to look forward to

  • but they probably won't have Niagara Falls,

  • Mount Rushmore, total solar eclipses or Saturn's rings.

  • They also won't have you. But

  • you have you. Except not all of it.

  • Babies don't begin to form episodic memories right

  • away, meaning that you missed out on. You don't remember two of the most seminal

  • events in your life.

  • Your conception and your birth.

  • But you can experience a bit of those moments

  • right now. First of all,

  • When Was I Conceived? dot com lets you enter your birthday

  • and get back the week your parents probably made

  • you happen, as well as the number one song and the number one movie of that

  • week, which may have also been involved.

  • Light travels quickly, the most quickest

  • in fact. But it can take a photon millions

  • of years to escape from the interior of the star it was created in through nuclear fusion.

  • It takes time, just like your own gestation

  • in your mother's womb. Newly conceived photons

  • struggle through a dense stellar jungle

  • of atoms and molecules and electrons that absorb and reemit the photon, taking a

  • little bit of energy from it as a randomly

  • rolls around like a pinball. Sometimes after thousands or millions of

  • years it's random walk finally leads it to the stars'

  • surface, where it pops out into space.

  • In a way, is born. A lucky, tiny tiny tiny percentage of the photons that reach the

  • surface of a star

  • find themselves on a path that will intersect

  • with earth. And if you are lucky, those photons will

  • end their journey by being absorbed

  • under your own retina. If you enter the date of your birth or the

  • approximate date of your conception into this online calculator

  • you can find a star that is as many light years away from

  • earth as you are old. When you look up at that start today,

  • you are seeing light that left the star the very month

  • you were born or photons that left that star

  • and entered space when your entire body was just

  • one cell.

  • Space is really big and your life is very short

  • but space is so gosh darn big you don't have to miss out

  • on everything.

  • And as always,

  • thanks for watching.

Hey, Vsauce.

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What Will We Miss?

  • 68 0
    Jerry shiu   に公開 2019 年 09 月 27 日
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