Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • [This talk contains graphic images]

    このトークにはグラフィック画像が含まれています。

  • So I'm sitting across from Pedro,

    だから私はペドロの向かいに座っています。

  • the coyote, the human smuggler,

    コヨーテ、人間の密輸業者。

  • in his cement block apartment,

    セメントブロックのアパートで

  • in a dusty Reynosa neighborhood

    埃っぽいレイノサ界隈で

  • somewhere on the US-Mexico border.

    アメリカとメキシコの国境のどこかで

  • It's 3am.

    午前3時です。

  • The day before, he had asked me to come back to his apartment.

    前日、彼のアパートに戻ってきてほしいと言われていました。

  • We would talk man to man.

    男同士で話をする

  • He wanted me to be there at night and alone.

    夜も一人でいてほしいとのことでした。

  • I didn't know if he was setting me up,

    嵌められたのかどうかわからなかった。

  • but I knew I wanted to tell his story.

    でも、私は彼の話をしたいと思っていました。

  • He asked me, "What will you do

    と聞かれました。

  • if one of these pollitos, or migrants, slips into the water and can't swim?

    これらの pollitos、または移民の1つは、水の中に滑り込んで泳ぐことができない場合は?

  • Will you simply take your pictures and watch him drown?

    単に写真を撮って、彼が溺れるのを見ているだけでしょうか?

  • Or will you jump in and help me?"

    それとも飛び込んで助けてくれるのか?"

  • At that moment, Pedro wasn't a cartoonish TV version of a human smuggler.

    その瞬間、ペドロは人間の密輸業者の漫画的なテレビ版ではなかった。

  • He was just a young man, about my age,

    彼は私と同じくらいの年齢の若い男性でした。

  • asking me some really tough questions.

    私に厳しい質問をしてきた

  • This was life and death.

    これは生と死だった。

  • The next night, I photographed Pedro as he swam the Rio Grande,

    翌日の夜、ペドロがリオグランデ川を泳ぐ姿を撮影しました。

  • crossing with a group of young migrants into the United States.

    アメリカへの若い移民の集団との横断。

  • Real lives hung in the balance every time he crossed people.

    現実の生活は、彼が人に逆らうたびに天秤にかけられていた。

  • For the last 20 years,

    この20年間

  • I've documented one of the largest transnational migrations

    私は、最大規模の国境を越えた移動の一つを記録してきました。

  • in world history,

    世界史の中で

  • which has resulted in millions of undocumented people

    その結果、何百万人もの不法滞在者が出てきました。

  • living in the United States.

    アメリカに住んでいる

  • The vast majority of these people leave Central America and Mexico

    その大多数が中米やメキシコから出て行く。

  • to escape grinding poverty and extreme levels of social violence.

    貧困と極端なレベルの社会的暴力から逃れるために。

  • I photograph intimate moments of everyday people's lives,

    私は、日常の人々の生活の中の親密な瞬間を撮影しています。

  • of people living in the shadows.

    影で生きている人たちの

  • Time and again, I've witnessed resilient individuals

    何度も何度も、私は回復力のある人を目撃してきました。

  • in extremely challenging situations

    窮地に立たされて

  • constructing practical ways to improve their lives.

    生活を向上させるための実践的な方法を構築する。

  • With these photographs,

    これらの写真と一緒に。

  • I place you squarely in the middle of these moments

    私はこの瞬間の真ん中に君を置いている

  • and ask you to think about them as if you knew them.

    と、知っているかのように考えてもらいます。

  • This body of work is a historical document,

    この体たらくは、歴史的な文書である。

  • a time capsule that can teach us not only about migration,

    移住だけでなく、私たちに教えてくれるタイムカプセル。

  • but about society and ourselves.

    社会や自分自身のことではなく

  • I started the project in the year 2000.

    年から始めました。

  • The migrant trail has taught me

    出稼ぎの道が教えてくれたこと

  • how we treat our most vulnerable residents in the United States.

    アメリカで最も弱い立場にある住民をどのように扱うのか

  • It has taught me about violence and pain and hope and resilience

    暴力と痛みと希望と回復力を教えてくれました。

  • and struggle and sacrifice.

    と闘争と犠牲になっています。

  • It has taught me firsthand

    それは私に直接教えてくれました

  • that rhetoric and political policy directly impact real people.

    レトリックや政治政策が現実の人々に直接影響を与えること。

  • And most of all,

    そして何よりも

  • the migrant trail has taught me

    移民の道が教えてくれたこと

  • that everyone who embarks on it is changed forever.

    それは、それに乗り出すすべての人が永遠に変わることを意味しています。

  • I began this project in the year 2000

    このプロジェクトを始めたのは2000年のことです。

  • by documenting a group of day laborers on Chicago's Northwest side.

    シカゴ北西側の日雇い労働者のグループを記録することで

  • Each day, the men would wake up at 5am,

    毎日、男たちは朝5時に起きていた。

  • go to a McDonald's, where they would stand outside

    彼らは外に立っているだろうマクドナルドに行く

  • and wait to jump into strangers' work vans,

    と見知らぬ人に飛び込むのを待つ'作業用バン。

  • in the hopes of finding a job for the day.

    その日のうちに仕事を見つけることを期待して

  • They earned five dollars an hour,

    彼らは1時間に5ドルを稼いでいました。

  • had no job security, no health insurance

    無職無保険

  • and were almost all undocumented.

    と、ほぼ全員が非移民でした。

  • The men were all pretty tough.

    男の人たちはみんなかなりタフな人たちでした。

  • They had to be.

    そうでなければならなかった

  • The police constantly harassed them for loitering,

    警察は絶えず彼らをうろついて嫌がらせをしていました。

  • as they made their way each day.

    彼らは毎日のように道を歩いていました。

  • Slowly, they welcomed me into their community.

    ゆっくりと、彼らは私を彼らのコミュニティに迎え入れてくれた。

  • And this was one of the first times

    そして、これが最初の一回目でした。

  • that I consciously used my camera as a weapon.

    意識的にカメラを武器にしたことで

  • One day, as the men were organizing to make a day-labor worker center,

    ある日、男たちが日雇い労働者センターを作ろうと組織化していたときのこと。

  • a young man named Tomás came up to me and asked me

    トマスという若者が近づいてきて、私に尋ねた。

  • will I stay afterwards and photograph him.

    私はその後に滞在し、彼を撮影することができます。

  • So I agreed.

    だから私は同意しました。

  • As he walked into the middle of the empty dirt lot,

    彼は誰もいないダートの真ん中に歩いていくと

  • a light summer rain started to fall.

    夏の小雨が降り出しました。

  • Much to my surprise, he started to take off his clothes. (Laughs)

    驚いたことに、彼は服を脱ぎ始めました。(笑)

  • I didn't exactly know what to do.

    どうすればいいのかよくわからなかった。

  • He pointed to the sky and said,

    彼は空を指差して言った。

  • "Our bodies are all we have."

    "私たちの体は私たちのすべてです"

  • He was proud, defiant and vulnerable, all at once.

    彼は誇り高く、反抗的で、脆弱だった。

  • And this remains one of my favorite photographs of the past 20 years.

    そして、これは過去20年間で最も好きな写真の一つであり続けています。

  • His words have stuck with me ever since.

    彼の言葉はそれ以来、私の心に刺さっています。

  • I met Lupe Guzmán around the same time,

    ルペ・グズマンにも同じ頃に会った。

  • while she was organizing and fighting the day-labor agencies

    彼女が日雇い労働者派遣会社を組織して戦っている間に

  • which were exploiting her and her coworkers.

    彼女とその同僚から搾取されていました。

  • She organized small-scale protests, sit-ins and much more.

    彼女は小規模な抗議活動や座り込みなどを組織していました。

  • She paid a high price for her activism,

    彼女は活動家として高い代償を払った。

  • because the day-labor agencies like Ron's

    なぜなら、ロンのような日雇い派遣会社は

  • blackballed her and refused to give her work.

    彼女をブラックボールにして、仕事を与えることを拒否した。

  • So in order to survive,

    だから、生き延びるためには

  • she started selling elotes, or corn on the cob, on the street,

    エロテを売り始めました。

  • as a street vendor.

    露天商として

  • And today, you can still find her

    そして、今日も彼女の

  • selling all types of corn and different candies and stuff.

    すべての種類のトウモロコシと異なるキャンディーやものを販売しています。

  • Lupe brought me into the inner world of her family

    ルペは私を彼女の家族の内なる世界に連れてきてくれた

  • and showed me the true impact of migration.

    と、移住の真のインパクトを見せてくれました。

  • She introduced me to everyone in her extended family,

    彼女の大家族のみんなに紹介してくれました。

  • Gabi, Juan, Conchi, Chava, everyone.

    ガビ、フアン、コンチ、チャバ、みんな。

  • Her sister Remedios had married Anselmo,

    妹のレメディオスはアンセルモと結婚していた。

  • whose eight of nine siblings

    九人兄弟のうち八人が

  • had migrated from Mexico to Chicago in the nineties.

    は90年代にメキシコからシカゴに移住していました。

  • So many people in her family opened their world to me

    彼女の家族の多くの人が私に世界を開いてくれた

  • and shared their stories.

    と話をシェアしてくれました。

  • Families are the heart and lifeblood of the migrant trail.

    家族は移民の道の中心であり、生命の源です。

  • When these families migrate,

    これらの家族が移住してくると

  • they change and transform societies.

    社会を変化させ、変容させます。

  • It's rare to be able to access so intimately

    ここまで親密にアクセスできるのは珍しい。

  • the intimate and day-to-day lives

    ぞくせい

  • of people who, by necessity, are closed to outsiders.

    必然的に部外者に閉ざされている人たちの

  • At the time,

    その時は

  • Lupe's family lived in the insular world of the Back of the Yards,

    ルペの家族は「バックオブザヤード」の世界に住んでいた。

  • a tight-knit Chicago neighborhood,

    シカゴの近所にある

  • which for more than 100 years had been a portal of entry

    百年来の玄関口

  • for recent immigrants --

    最近の移民のために

  • first, from Europe, like my family,

    まず、私の家族のようにヨーロッパから。

  • and more recently, from Latin America.

    そして最近ではラテンアメリカからも。

  • Their world was largely hidden from view.

    彼らの世界はほとんど視界から隠されていた。

  • And they call the larger, white world outside the neighborhood

    そして、彼らは近所の外にある大きな白い世界を

  • "Gringolandia."

    "グリンゴランド"

  • You know, like lots of generations moving to the Back of the Yards,

    沢山の世代がヤードの裏に移動してるようなもんだろ

  • the family did the thankless hidden jobs that most people didn't want to do:

    家族は、ほとんどの人がやりたくないという感謝されない隠れた仕事をしていました。

  • cleaning office buildings, preparing airline meals in cold factories,

    オフィスビルの清掃、寒冷地の工場での航空会社の食事の準備

  • meat packing, demolitions.

    肉の梱包、解体

  • It was hard manual labor for low exploitation wages.

    搾取賃金が低い割にはきつい肉体労働だった。

  • But on weekends, they celebrated together,

    でも、週末には一緒にお祝いをしていました。

  • with backyard barbecues

    バーベキュー付き

  • and birthday celebrations,

    と誕生日のお祝いをしています。

  • like most working families the world over.

    世界中のほとんどの労働者の家庭のように

  • I became an honorary family member.

    名誉家族になりました。

  • My nickname was "Johnny Canales," after the Tejano TV star.

    私のあだ名は「ジョニー・カナレス」で、テハーノのテレビスターにちなんでいました。

  • I had access to the dominant culture,

    私は支配的な文化にアクセスしていました。

  • so I was part family photographer, part social worker

    私は家族写真家であり ソーシャルワーカーでもありました

  • and part strange outsider payaso clown, who was there to amuse them.

    と一部の奇妙なアウトサイダーのパヤソのピエロは、彼らを楽しませるためにそこにいた。

  • One of the most memorable moments of this time

    今回の中でも特に印象に残っているのは

  • was photographing the birth of Lupe's granddaughter, Elizabeth.

    ルペの孫娘エリザベスの誕生を撮影していました。

  • Her two older siblings had crossed across the Sonoran Desert,

    彼女の二人の兄妹は、ソノラン砂漠を横断していた。

  • being carried and pushed in strollers into the United States.

    ベビーカーに乗せられてアメリカに押し込まれている。

  • So at that time,

    だから、その時は

  • her family allowed me to photograph her birth.

    彼女の家族が出産の写真を撮らせてくれました。

  • And it was one of the really coolest things

    そして、それは本当にクールなものの一つでした。

  • as the nurses placed baby Elizabeth on Gabi's chest.

    看護師がガビの胸の上に赤ちゃんエリザベスを配置したように。

  • She was the family's first American citizen.

    彼女は一家初のアメリカ市民だった。

  • That girl is 17 today.

    その子は今日で17歳。

  • And I still remain in close contact with Lupe

    そして、今でもルペとは連絡を取り合っています。

  • and much of her family.

    そして彼女の家族の多くが

  • My work is firmly rooted in my own family's history

    私の作品は、私の家系の歴史にしっかりと根ざしています。

  • of exile and subsequent rebirth in the United States.

    アメリカでの亡命とその後の再生。

  • My father was born in Nazi Germany in 1934.

    父は1934年にナチスドイツで生まれました。

  • Like most assimilated German Jews,

    同化したドイツ人ユダヤ人のように

  • my grandparents simply hoped

    祖父母の希望

  • that the troubles of the Third Reich would blow over.

    第三帝国の問題が吹き飛ぶだろうと

  • But in spring of 1939,

    しかし、1939年の春。

  • a small but important event happened to my family.

    小さなことですが、家族に大切な出来事が起こりました。

  • My dad needed an appendectomy.

    父は盲腸手術を必要としていました。

  • And because he was Jewish,

    ユダヤ人だったから

  • not one hospital would operate on him.

    どの病院も彼を手術してくれなかった。

  • The operation was carried out on his kitchen table,

    手術は彼のキッチンテーブルの上で行われた。

  • on the family's kitchen table.

    家族の台所のテーブルの上に。

  • Only after understanding the discrimination they faced

    自分たちが直面している差別を理解してから

  • did my grandparents make the gut-wrenching decision

    祖父母の苦渋の決断

  • to send their two children on the Kindertransport bound for England.

    二人の子供をイギリス行きのキンダルトランスポートに乗せるために

  • My family's survival has informed my deep commitment

    私の家族の生き残りが、私の深い献身を教えてくれました。

  • to telling this migration story

    この移住の物語を伝えるために

  • in a deep and nuanced way.

    を深く、ニュアンスのある形で表現しています。

  • The past and the present are always interconnected.

    過去と現在は常に相互につながっています。

  • The long-standing legacy

    長年の遺産

  • of the US government's involvement in Latin America

    アメリカ政府のラテンアメリカへの関与について

  • is controversial and well-documented.

    は物議を醸しており、十分に文書化されています。

  • The 1954 CIA-backed coup of Árbenz in Guatemala,

    1954年のグアテマラのアルベンツのクーデター。

  • the Iran-Contra scandal, the School of the Americas,

    イラン・コントラスキャンダル、アメリカ大陸の学校。

  • the murder of Archbishop Romero on the steps of a San Salvador church

    サンサルバドル教会の階段でのロメロ大司教殺害事件

  • are all examples of this complex history,

    は、いずれもこの複雑な歴史の一例である。

  • a history which has led to instability

    ふあんれきし

  • and impunity in Central America.

    と中米での不敬罪。

  • Luckily, the history is not unremittingly dark.

    幸いなことに、歴史の闇は尽きることがありません。

  • The United States and Mexico took in thousands and millions, actually,

    アメリカとメキシコが何千、何百万も引き取ったんだよ、実際に。

  • of refugees escaping the civil wars of the 70s and 80s.

    70~80年代の内戦を逃れてきた難民のうち

  • But by the time I was documenting the migrant trail in Guatemala

    しかし、グアテマラでの移民の足跡を記録していた頃には

  • in the late 2000s,

    2000年代後半に

  • most Americans had no connection to the increasing levels of violence,

    ほとんどのアメリカ人は、暴力レベルの上昇とは無縁でした。

  • impunity and migration in Central America.

    中米におけるインポニティと移民。

  • To most US citizens, it might as well have been the Moon.

    ほとんどのアメリカ市民にとっては、月と同じようなものだったかもしれない。

  • Over the years, I slowly pieced together

    何年もかけて、私はゆっくりと

  • the complicated puzzle that stretched from Central America through Mexico

    中米からメキシコまでの複雑なパズル

  • to my backyard in Chicago.

    シカゴの裏庭に

  • I hit almost all the border towns -- Brownsville, Reynosa, McAllen,

    国境の町をほぼ全て回った ブラウンズビル レイノサ マッカレン

  • Yuma, Calexico --

    ユマ カレクシコ

  • recording the increasing militarization of the border.

    国境の軍国主義化が進んでいることを記録しています。

  • Each time I returned,

    その都度、私は戻ってきました。

  • there was more infrastructure, more sensors, more fences,

    インフラ、センサー、フェンスが増えた。

  • more Border Patrol agents and more high-tech facilities

    より多くのボーダーパトロール捜査官とより多くのハイテク施設

  • with which to incarcerate the men, women and children

    幽閉するために

  • who our government detained.

    私たちの政府が拘留した人

  • Post-9/11, it became a huge industry.

    9.11後には巨大産業になってしまった。

  • I photographed the massive and historic immigration marches in Chicago,

    シカゴの大規模で歴史的な移民行進を撮影しました。

  • children at detention facilities

    留置場児童

  • and the slow percolating rise of anti-immigrant hate groups,

    移民排斥派のゆっくりとした台頭と

  • including sheriff Joe Arpaio in Arizona.

    アリゾナのジョー・アルパイオ保安官を含む

  • I documented the children in detention facilities,

    拘置所にいる子どもたちの様子を記録しました。

  • deportation flights

    強制送還便

  • and a lot of different things.

    とか色々なことが書かれています。

  • I witnessed the rise of the Mexican drug war

    私はメキシコの麻薬戦争の勃興を目の当たりにした

  • and the deepening levels of social violence in Central America.

    と、中米における社会的暴力の深化のレベルを示しています。

  • I came to understand how interconnected all these disparate elements were

    私は、これらの異なる要素がどれほど相互に関連しているかを理解するようになりました。

  • and how interconnected we all are.

    そして、私たちはどれだけ相互につながっているのか。

  • As photographers,

    写真家として。

  • we never really know which particular moment will stay with us

    刻一刻と心に残るものはない

  • or which particular person will be with us.

    とか、どの特定の人が一緒にいるのか。

  • The people we photograph become a part of our collective history.

    私たちが撮影した人々は、私たちの歴史の一部になります。

  • Jerica Estrada was a young eight-year-old girl

    ジェリカ・エストラーダは8歳の若さで

  • whose memory has stayed with me.

    その記憶が私の心に残っている

  • Her father had gone to LA in order to work to support his family.

    彼女の父親は、家族を養うために働くためにLAに行っていた。

  • And like any dutiful father,

    そして、他の従順な父親のように

  • he returned home to Guatemala, bearing gifts.

    彼は贈り物を持って グアテマラに帰った

  • That weekend, he had presented his eldest son with a motorcycle --

    その週末、彼は長男にバイクをプレゼントしていた。

  • a true luxury.

    真の贅沢。

  • As the son was driving the father back home

    息子が父親を車で帰宅させている間に

  • from a family party,

    ファミリーパーティーから

  • a gang member rode up and shot the dad through the back.

    ギャングが乗り込んできて 父親を撃ち抜いたんだ

  • It was a case of mistaken identity,

    身元を間違えていた事件でした。

  • an all too common occurrence in this country.

    この国ではよくあることだ

  • But the damage was done.

    しかし、被害が出てしまいました。

  • The bullet passed through the father and into the son.

    弾丸は父親を通り越して、息子の中に入った。

  • This was not a random act of violence,

    これは無差別の暴力行為ではありませんでした。

  • but one instance of social violence

    社会的暴力の一例

  • in a region of the world where this has become the norm.

    これが当たり前になっている地域では

  • Impunity thrives when all the state and governmental institutions

    国家と政府機関のすべてが不公正を助長する

  • fail to protect the individual.

    個人を守ることができない。

  • Too often, the result forces people to leave their homes and flee

    あまりにも多くの場合、その結果、人々は家を出て逃げることを余儀なくされます。

  • and take great risks in search of safety.

    と安全を求めて大きな危険を冒す。

  • Jerica's father died en route to the hospital.

    ジェリカの父親は病院に向かう途中で死亡した。

  • His body had saved his son's life.

    彼の体は息子の命を救った。

  • As we arrived to the public hospital,

    公立病院に到着すると

  • to the gates of the public hospital,

    公立病院の門をくぐって

  • I noticed a young girl in a pink striped shirt, screaming.

    ピンクのストライプのシャツを着た若い女の子が叫んでいるのに気づいた。

  • Nobody comforted the little girl as she clasped her tiny hands.

    小さな手を握りしめた少女を誰も慰める者はいなかった。

  • She was the man's youngest daughter,

    彼女はその男の末娘だった。

  • her name was Jerica Estrada.

    彼女の名前はジェリカ・エストラーダ

  • She cried and raged,

    彼女は泣いて激怒した。

  • and nobody could do anything, for her father was gone.

    誰も何もできなかった彼女の父親はいなくなっていたからだ

  • These days, when people ask me

    最近では、人に聞かれても

  • why young mothers with four-month-old babies

    生後4ヶ月の赤ちゃんを持つ若いお母さんの理由

  • will travel thousands of miles,

    は何千マイルもの距離を移動します。

  • knowing they will likely be imprisoned in the United States,

    彼らが米国で投獄される可能性が高いことを知っています。

  • I remember Jerica, and I think of her and of her pain

    私はジェリカを覚えていて、彼女と彼女の痛みを思い出す

  • and of her father who saved his son's life with his own body,

    そして、息子の命を自分の体で救った父親のこと。

  • and I understand the truly human need

    そして、私は本当に人間の必要性を理解しています。

  • to migrate in search of a better life.

    を求めて移住すること。

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

[This talk contains graphic images]

このトークにはグラフィック画像が含まれています。