Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • - [Narrator] What is socialism really?

  • Equality and liberty?

  • Taking the power and money out of rich people's hands

  • and giving it back to the people?

  • A revolution to make everything and everyone equal?

  • (ominous orchestra music)

  • But have we considered who would be in charge

  • if such revolutions were made?

  • Socialism never stays socialism.

  • There is an agenda.

  • But who are the key figures in this agenda?

  • Episode III: Communism and Socialism.

  • (futuristic music)

  • - [Whispering Woman] Edge of Wonder.

  • - Welcome to The Edge of Wonder.

  • - Hey Rob? - Yeah?

  • - What's socialism?

  • - That's a good question.

  • Everyone seems to be confused right now

  • about what that means.

  • Some people think it means equality or liberty of some sort,

  • which is a conundrum we'll get into later.

  • - To some people, they think it means taking the power

  • and money out of the rich people's hands

  • and giving it back to the people.

  • But really, does that really ever happen?

  • - Some people think it means being progressive

  • and fostering some kind of positive change,

  • so it's become a hot term among specific groups of people.

  • - Still some say it's revolution,

  • specifically that of destroying civilization

  • to make everything and everyone equal.

  • - But have people given thought to who would be in charge

  • if such revolutions were made?

  • - In this episode, we're gonna explore one

  • of the most elusive terms in our political atmosphere

  • and let history do the talking.

  • - We'll help everyone define socialism

  • and show you facts that can help you make up your minds

  • about whether it's good or bad.

  • - Let's start at the beginning.

  • Socialism had to come from somewhere, right?

  • One of the arguments often given in favor

  • of socialism is that, quote, "We need to give it a chance."

  • - Or when people well-learned in the history

  • of socialism and communism say that it never worked,

  • the argument is given

  • that it's never been implemented correctly,

  • or we need to try again.

  • After our research,

  • we realized this couldn't be further from the truth.

  • - The entirety of the 1800s was filled

  • with numerous experiments to establish socialist communes,

  • even before the word socialism was a term.

  • - Each of these experiments failed miserably.

  • And when we say miserable, we mean it.

  • Now bear with us, this story deserves to be told.

  • - It's important to bring up someone considered

  • to be the first pioneer of the movement

  • later known as socialism,

  • an English cotton mill owner named Robert Owen.

  • (somber piano music)

  • - Owen established an industrial system

  • along new lines in a village called New Lanark in Scotland.

  • Owen played the part of a benevolent ruler.

  • He created a system where people were given wages

  • and punished for poor work.

  • Any proceeds from the work at the mill were collected

  • by Owen, and he spent it how he saw fit.

  • - Owen actually used this money

  • for charity donations and philanthropy.

  • Now here's where it gets important.

  • The system we just described is 100% capitalist.

  • So then how is it that Owen is conflated

  • with communism and socialism?

  • Well, we haven't finished the story yet.

  • - After his somewhat successful

  • and unconventional experiment at New Lanark,

  • it seems his reputation made him well known.

  • To make a very long story short,

  • Owen was compromised by illuminism,

  • which became plainly obvious

  • through his writings at the time.

  • - Owen would consistently express himself

  • in ways only Adam Weishaupt would,

  • exposing his true intentions.

  • And by the way, if you haven't seen our first two episodes

  • on communism, we explain everything about Weishaupt in those

  • so we would recommend watching those.

  • - [Narrator] "For example, in the latter it was stated

  • "that the aim of the Illuminati was

  • "to make of the human race,

  • "without any distinction of nation, condition,

  • "or profession, one good and happy family."

  • - [Ben] And Owen announced.

  • - [Narrator] "That new state of existence upon earth,

  • "which when understood and applied rationally to practice,

  • "will cordially unite

  • all as one good an enlightened family."

  • - Because time is tight, trust us when we say,

  • there are multiple examples of how Owen's writings lined

  • up exactly with Weishaupt.

  • But his words aren't the only examples

  • that will help us understand the failures of communism.

  • Because shortly after, Owen's mind started to change

  • toward these illuminized philosophies.

  • He attempted to experiment with communities based entirely

  • off of socialist strategies.

  • - [Rob] In 1824, Owen arrived in America, the new world,

  • and bought a village in Indiana he called New Harmony.

  • He instituted a completely socialist system

  • but encountered a great difficulty.

  • He found that people had no, quote, noble

  • desire to work for the common good

  • when there was no way to personally profit,

  • meaning they were literally not getting anything

  • for their hard work but were expected to slave away.

  • - He also found it extremely difficult

  • when people had no personal property of their own.

  • And even when there would be a short time

  • of everyone getting on the same page,

  • human desires for gaining more

  • would always find their way in.

  • - In the end, Owen stated, quote.

  • - [Narrator] "No societies with common property

  • "and equality could prosper if composed of persons unfit

  • "for their peculiar duties.

  • "In order to succeed, it was needful

  • "to exclude the intemperate, the idle, the careless,

  • "the quarrelsome, the avaricious, the selfish."

  • - What this quote is basically saying is that

  • in order to have communism work,

  • a society would have to be comprised of only perfect people.

  • - Socialist-leaning historians, to this day,

  • still proclaim victory and Owen

  • as the greatest historical figure

  • in creating a socialist experiment that worked.

  • But these historians conveniently overlook the facts.

  • Any economist will tell you the mill experiment

  • in New Lanark is anything but socialism.

  • - Many other experiments like this happened

  • through the early 1800s, and every single one failed.

  • You can look into this for yourself.

  • Marx and Engels went from criticizing Owen

  • to then championing him as the greatest example

  • of advancement of communism from the early 1800s,

  • which actually makes no sense.

  • - The example of Robert Owen can't be overemphasized.

  • Why, because there is still to this day,

  • a huge misunderstanding of socialism.

  • Many misinformed people constantly use an argument

  • that socialism works, and they know it works

  • because it works in Nordic countries, right?

  • - I mean, if you do research on this, as we did,

  • you'll find numerous sources that show

  • that what the Nordic countries implement

  • is absolutely not socialism.

  • In July, 2018, an article on Forbes,

  • titled, Sorry Bernie Bros

  • But Nordic Countries Are Not Socialist published.

  • The author called what Nordic countries implement,

  • quote, compassionate capitalism.

  • - [Ben] In an article on fee.org,

  • we're going to cite a quote here.

  • "In response to Americans frequently referring

  • "to his country as socialist, the Prime Minister

  • "of Denmark recently remarked in a lecture

  • "at Harvard Kennedy School of Government, quote,

  • - [Rob] "I know that some people

  • "in the US associate the Nordic Model

  • "with some sort of socialism.

  • "Therefore, I would like to make one thing clear.

  • "Denmark is far from a socialist planned economy.

  • "Denmark is a market economy."

  • - Why did the president of Denmark say this?

  • It's because those countries thrive

  • off of large financial gains from their market economies.

  • The reason the author called it compassionate capitalism

  • is because these countries often have high taxes

  • that offer some benefits from the government.

  • - But the only reason they're able to have high taxes

  • is because the wages are very high.

  • We've largely covered socialism

  • in terms of economics, right?

  • But now we're going to get more

  • into the heart of the actual matter.

  • (tense instrumental music)

  • - We mentioned Marx and Engels earlier.

  • We should probably look at how those

  • who penned the most influential book on communism,

  • The Communist Manifesto, looked at socialism.

  • If you read The Epoch Times' Specter of Communism series,

  • it says.

  • - [Narrator] "In 1875, in Critique of the Gotha Programme,

  • "Marx put forward the idea that there is an initial phase

  • "of communism, followed by an advanced phase.

  • "Compelled by changes in the international situation

  • "at the time, Friedrich Engels in his later years

  • "also proposed democratic socialism,

  • "in which votes were used to obtain political power.

  • "Democratic socialism was adopted

  • "by social democratic party leaders

  • "and theorists of the second international

  • "and led to the left-wing parties

  • "in many capitalist countries around the world today.

  • "Lenin set down clear definitions

  • "of socialism and communism.

  • "He considered socialism to be the preliminary phase

  • "of communism and communism to be developed

  • "on the basis of socialism."

  • - In fact, there is a famous quote from Lenin, who said.

  • - [Narrator] "The goal of socialism is communism."

  • - This means that since the very beginning of communism,

  • socialism has always been considered

  • to be its preliminary phase.

  • If that's the case, then it would change our perception

  • of how to look at socialism fundamentally, right?

  • Because it never just stays socialism.

  • There is an actual agenda.

  • - Furthermore, there are many organizations

  • that identify themselves to be democratic socialists,

  • a critical part in the above strategy

  • to make a non-communist state communist.

  • - Democratic socialist societies have existed

  • for a very long time in the US.

  • They've also been present in other countries as well.

  • One of the largest democratic socialist societies

  • is the London Headquartered Fabian Society.

  • So who are the Fabian Socialists?

  • - Well, their philosophy was to not get as crazy

  • as the revolutionaries.

  • Their goal was to use alternative tactics

  • to create fundamental change and social justice.

  • Notice the terms here?

  • They believed they could do this through the Bourgeoisie

  • or cultural elites, completely overseeing

  • and strategically influencing the working class.

  • In Epoch Times' Specter of Communism, it states.

  • - [Narrator] "Unlike totalitarian regimes,

  • "socialism in democratic states slowly eats away

  • "at people's freedoms through legislation,

  • "like the metaphor of the boiling frog.

  • "The process of establishing a socialist system

  • "takes decades or generations,

  • "leaving people gradually numb, oblivious,

  • "and accustomed to socialism,

  • "all of which enhance the deceit.

  • "The essence and objective of this type

  • "of gradual socialism are no different in substance

  • "from the violent form."

  • - How did they do this? Well, they tweaked the culture.

  • An example of this is playwright, Bernard Shaw,

  • one of the most prominent members of the Fabian Society.