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  • - Hello we are Joel and Lia.

  • - And today we're joined by

  • Real English with Real Teachers, Harry and Charlie.

  • - Ooh.

  • Okay, so what this video is about,

  • it's all about what Brits say and what they really mean.

  • So, we've actually done half of this video

  • over on Harry and Charlie's channel

  • with some acting examples, especially for you guys,

  • and now we're gonna do the other half here.

  • So, let's kick it off with the first one,

  • which is saying sorry too much.

  • - Sorry.

  • - Sorry.

  • - Sorry.

  • - Brits do that all the time.

  • - Yeah.

  • - So I went to a pub to meet up with

  • a good friend of mine, and we were watching football,

  • and it was a really, really busy club, pub.

  • Really busy pub in central London.

  • And this guy was walking past me with his pint,

  • and when you're in the pub you walk

  • with your pint really close to you like this,

  • and I knocked into him and spilled his pint on him.

  • So, it was my fault.

  • Therefore, I should be the person saying sorry,

  • but I didn't.

  • And he said sorry to me.

  • He said sorry to me!

  • - Yeah.

  • - He's like, "I'm sorry".

  • I was like, "why are you saying sorry?"

  • - I once said sorry to a bass when

  • it splashed me with water.

  • And then I realized I'm the one soaked in crap.

  • - That's terrible, did he stop?

  • - No, of course not, he couldn't hear me.

  • - Sorry, Bass!

  • - Sorry, Bass.

  • Yeah, I say sorry to like, inanimate objects as well.

  • - Yeah, yeah, I've had that.

  • I got some headphones once, and I was concentrating

  • on where I was going, and yeah, hit a lamppost

  • and apologized to it.

  • - I don't know why we do it.

  • And it is a British thing.

  • Someone told me the off the other day for apologizing

  • to you in a video.

  • They were like "why did you apologize?"

  • - Really?

  • - I just did.

  • - What were you saying?

  • - You told me off for being too excitable,

  • and then I was like "sorry,"

  • and they were like "why did you apologize?"

  • - (gasps)

  • Oh my gosh.

  • - It's very, very English.

  • - Yes, so English.

  • - It's like filling a silence.

  • Even when I'm shopping in Sainsbury's, and I'm going

  • down an aisle, I heard someone the other day,

  • I was literally just passing a lady.

  • She said sorry to me.

  • She said "sorry".

  • Why are you saying sorry?

  • I'm just going to get my frozen chips!

  • Chill out!

  • - Have you ever reached for the last avocado,

  • and someone else gets there, and you say "oh sorry".

  • - I love that it's an avocado as well,

  • very middle class problem.

  • - The next one is all Brits' favorite thing is queueing.

  • So, I'm gonna tell you right now, that we love a queue.

  • - Or a line, as Americans say.

  • - A line.

  • We're unable to deal with anyone who can't queue.

  • So, for instance, this morning, I was meeting Joel,

  • I was in Pratt & Monjay, and I was queueing up,

  • and people just kept jumping in front of me,

  • and I was having like, a mild panic attack because of this.

  • And I think the guy behind the counter could see

  • that I was triggered, and

  • I finally got my space because Joel actually pushed me in.

  • - I pushed her.

  • - And he was like, "it's your turn, Lia."

  • - 'Cause a man was about to overtake her, I went

  • "no", and then pushed Lia, instead of telling you to move.

  • - Exactly.

  • This is a very non British thing to do.

  • Whereas a Brit would normally go like "oh, are

  • you in front of me?"

  • - Yeah. - Yeah?

  • - Yeah, we would, wouldn't we?

  • - Yeah, yeah, that's the first thing I would say.

  • "Oh, are you next?"

  • - Even though you know the order.

  • - Exactly. - Yeah.

  • - I want you to say "no, you can go."

  • - Can I just say that I actually got my croissant

  • for free because the guy ...

  • - It was worth it.

  • - It was so worth it.

  • - He was feeling for you that much?

  • - Not the guy who pushed in front of me, the ...

  • - No, the sales. - Yeah.

  • - Wow.

  • - I've never had anything for free from Pratt before,

  • and it's like a thing in the UK.

  • If you get something for free from Pratt, like,

  • they get one gift a day.

  • They get to gift one ...

  • - Do they? - Yeah.

  • - I didn't know that.

  • - So, look upset, do whatever you can to try and

  • get free stuff from Pratt.

  • - Okay.

  • - That's a little tip from me to you.

  • - Yeah, I think they can choose one customer

  • per day that they give something free to.

  • - Yes.

  • - So, "you can have a free coffee on me".

  • - Yup.

  • - "You've got a nice smile" or something.

  • - Can they do it for themselves?

  • - I'd give it to me.

  • (laughing)

  • - (singing Happy Birthday)

  • - I've never got anything for free from Pratt because

  • I'm miserable

  • most the time.

  • - Actually, it has actually happened to me once before,

  • I was waiting for a really long time,

  • I was just waiting in Pratt, and they kept coming over

  • and being like "are you okay?"

  • And I was like "yeah, I'm just waiting".

  • And then after about 45 minutes they said "this is on

  • the house" and they gave me a green tea.

  • - Were you waiting for a date?

  • - It was this ...

  • Yeah, it was a date.

  • He was late.

  • - Were you queueing?

  • - No, I was not queueing, I was waiting patiently

  • like a good Brit.

  • - We are pretty,

  • we're pretty damn patient, aren't we?

  • - So patient.

  • You know, someone's 45 minutes late for a date,

  • and they get there and they're like "oh, have

  • you been waiting long?"

  • And you're like "oh, no, not long at all.

  • Just got here."

  • - Yeah.

  • Yeah, you don't wanna lose face in that situation.

  • - No, never.

  • - So the last one is the phrase "do you want me to..."

  • It's something that we'll use

  • (laughing)

  • If we wanna get something out of someone.

  • (voices overlapping)

  • - We're too scared of saying "can you".

  • It can also be "do you want to?"

  • If you know that someone needs to do something,

  • you can say "do you wanna maybe wash up those plates?"

  • - Yeah.

  • - Well, of course you don't want to.

  • But they know that it's your obligation,

  • you should do it.

  • - Yeah, or you say

  • "do you want me to wash up your plates?"

  • - "Do you want me to wash up these plates

  • that you haven't washed in over a week,

  • you lazy ..."

  • - Yeah.

  • - Or the email scenario.

  • If Harry hasn't done it, say "do you want me to

  • email that contractor that we were saying

  • that you should email?"

  • - Yes actually ... - Yesterday?

  • - Last night this happened, you were like

  • "could you email this person?"

  • And I was like "oh, I thought it was your

  • responsibility to email people this month,

  • but do you want me to do it?"

  • - Yeah.

  • - Of course I didn't want to do it, but I was

  • kind of going back to that and saying

  • "do you want me to do it?"

  • Because I knew that after that you would realize it was

  • your job to do it,

  • and you did, you yielded!

  • - It's a bit of a ...

  • - The layers of subtext.

  • It's just too much.

  • - It's a heated sandwich now, isn't it?

  • - [Joel And Lia] It's such a heated sandwich.

  • - I'm sweaty.

  • I love though, listening to how other duos work,

  • 'cause it makes me feel better about how we work.

  • Brits are weird.

  • - Yeah,

  • Brits are very, very weird, and we want you guys to

  • leave us a comment below if you found any of these

  • things in your culture,

  • or if you are British, and you identify with this.

  • That's where you pick it up, Joel.

  • (laughing)

  • - Sorry, I was just ...

  • - Yeah, You gotta fill in those silences.

  • - And don't forget to head over to Harry and Charlie's

  • channel to check out the video we did over there.

  • - And thanks so much for watching, guys.

  • We will see you again soon.

  • - [Together] Goodbye!

  • - This is nice and cozy.

  • - It is, yeah!

  • - You've got us in a Joel and Lia sandwich,

  • so you're the bread.

  • - [Joel] How do you feel being the filling this time?

  • - [Lia] Oh, I'm quite enjoying being the filling,

  • it's nice and warm.

  • - [Harry] Yeah, I'm a bit cold.

- Hello we are Joel and Lia.

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イギリス人がやっている3つのこと、逆のことを言っている3つのこと|本物の先生が教えるリアル英語 (3 THINGS BRITISH PEOPLE DO & SAY THAT MEAN THE OPPOSITE | Real English with Real Teachers)

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    Michael Cheung   に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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