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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Bringing stories from around the world right to your classroom. This is CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up today, we are heading to Australia where officials are worried that a wildfire outbreak could get worse.

  • At least 56 fires are burning across Australia.

  • On Sunday, authorities said 12 of them were out of control.

  • A very dry winter and month without much rain set up conditions for wildfires.

  • In this video, you can see how strong the winds are.

  • That`s not helping either.

  • Those winds can spread the wildfires, making it harder for firefighters to get the flames under control.

  • Local news agencies are predicting hot, dry and windy conditions over the next few days.

  • Our next story takes us to Syria.

  • International inspectors are destroying the country`s chemical weapons.

  • The civil war is as brutal as ever.

  • Since the fighting started two and a half years ago, more than 2 million people have fled from Syria.

  • They might have gotten away from the violence, but life as a refugee comes with its own different challenges.

  • MOHAMMED JAMJOOM, CNN CORRESPONDENT: We talk a lot about the weaponry that`s being used in Syria.

  • We talk a lot about the diplomacy that is being utilized to try to end the political crisis.

  • It`s important to remind people that there are now at least 2 million Syria refugees.

  • That`s just the number of registered refugees.

  • It`s not getting any better and the world needs to be reminded, when you go to any of these refugee communities,

  • what you see is truly chilling because this has the potential to become a lost generation for Syrians.

  • And the refugees that I`ve spoken with repeatedly say they don`t know what`s going to happen to them.

  • They want more than anything to go home,

  • but they can`t go home, they are so fearful for their lives back at home,

  • but they are also fearful for their future in the countries that they now reside in.

  • NIC ROBERTSON, CNN CORRESPONDENT: What we`ve seen in the past with refugees, is if there`s an opportunity to go back, if they think it`s safe in their hometown, they will go back.

  • If they don`t they will stay out at whatever cost.

  • Because they know it`s better to be alive, even to be hungry, even to be cold, even to be living in a tent in a desert, they would rather do that than face the possibility of death.

  • So, the future for the refugees is not a good one.

  • It`s one where there`s not enough money coming in from the international communities to support them,

  • and it`s one where they are increasingly unwelcome in the places where they are.

  • The outlook is not good.

  • And the history of this region is, that refugees once displaced,

  • can sometimes spend even the rest of their lives outside away from their own countries.

  • ANNOUNCER: See, if you can I.D. me.

  • I`m a famous luxury ship.

  • When I was built, I was the world`s largest passenger ship.

  • I only made one voyage, and I sank in the North Atlantic in April of 1912.

  • I`m the RMS Titanic. And my wreckage was discovered in 1985.

  • AZUZ: This violin once belonged to a musician named Wallace Hartley.

  • If the name`s unfamiliar, you`ll know the ship he sailed on.

  • Hartley was the band leader of the Titanic.

  • That`s the reason why the instrument fetched $1.7 million in auction October 19th England.

  • Unlike many other Titanic artifacts, the violin didn`t fall to the ocean floor.

  • Historians believe it was strapped to Hartley`s body when it was pulled from the water days after Titanic sank.

  • It turned up in an attic in Britain seven years ago.

  • And what helped identify it, was an engraving from Hartley`s fiance,

  • "For Wallace on the Occasion of Our Engagement from Maria.

  • The violin was returned to her after the shipwreck.

  • Maria never married.

  • To be fair, other historic violins have gone for more.

  • A rare 1721 Stradivarius once fetched almost $16 million.

  • This violin is one of many Titanic artifacts, including others from Wallace Hartley to come up for auction.

  • It may be the most symbolic, though.

  • It tells the story that is at once a romance and the tragedy.

  • As remembered in films about the Titanic,

  • this is believed to be the instrument Hartley used for the hymn "Nearer God To Thee" as the band played on and the ship sank into the icy Atlantic.

  • Like the Titanic itself, Hartley`s violin keeps its secrets locked deep inside.

  • The Grambling State University football team is 0 and seven this season.

  • This weekend, Grambling lost to Jackson State without ever taking the field.

  • Most players refused to even get on the bus.

  • They are angry about the team`s travel conditions.

  • About the state of training facilities and about the head coach being fired.

  • Last week, the team boycotted two practices, then players walked out of a meeting with university officials,

  • and finally the decision not to play against Jackson State.

  • Grambling will have to pay a $20,000 fine,

  • and officials say players` scholarships could be revoked if they don`t go to practice or games,

  • although last Friday school officials said they weren`t planning to enforce that.

  • They also said some team facilities are due for upgrades in the next few weeks.

  • What happens next? Grambling`s athletic director said quote,

  • "we wait until Monday and see if they come to weight training."

  • ANNOUNCER: It`s time for the shoutout.

  • Which of these words is an antonym for static?

  • If you think you know it, then shout it out.

  • Is it immobile, magnetized, dynamic or didactic?

  • You got 3 seconds, go.

  • Static relates to things that are at rest, so its antonym or opposite is something that`s in motion or dynamic.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • AZUZ: And aerodynamics deals with the motion of air and with the force on things that are in motion in the air.

  • So engineers have to consider aerodynamics when they are designing cars and planes.

  • Or in the case of the Transition, both.

  • It`s a new kind of vehicle, and before you can get in it, you need two licenses - one for driving and one for flying.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s a bird, it`s a plane. It`s a Transition?

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We flew, yes!

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Traditional cars are in for some serious competition come 2015.

  • The Terrafugia Transition -- literally a flying car.

  • To be fair, it`s closer to a plane that drives than a car that flies.

  • Carl Dietrich, Terrafugia`s co-founder and CEO, got the idea for his flying car while he was studying at MIT.

  • CARL DIETRICH, CEO, TERRAFUGIA: The Transition is the evolution of a lot of years of thinking and

  • you know, dreaming about things like this, and it started long before me.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Way before. Glenn Curtis, the chief rival of the Wright brothers, designed the first flying car in 1918,

  • but his bulky three-wing Curtis autoplane could only hop.

  • So it flunked (ph).

  • But what was once the stuff of fiction is now reality.

  • If you have $279,000 lying around and at least 20 hours of flying time under your belt -

  • the standard needed to pilot a light aircraft - this flying car could be yours.

  • The Transition is essentially a small plane designed to be roadworthy.

  • Push a button and the wings pull up, allowing the pilot to drive it like a car.

  • It even runs on regular, unleaded gasoline.

  • DIETRICH: It definitely gets a lot of attention.

  • You know, when you are driving this on public roads, or we had it at a gas station yesterday filling up,

  • and you know, people definitely stare a little bit.

  • I would say it`s better than having a super sports car, I mean, because this one really does fly.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: But is it safe?

  • Dietrich says it is.

  • The flying car can travel at a speed of about 215 miles an hour, with a range of about 450 miles in the air,

  • similar to a small plane.

  • DIETRICH: The Transition is kind of a symbol of what we can accomplish, and these things are totally technically achievable.

  • AZUZ: Roll call gives us a chance to feature all kinds of schools on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Today we`re adding three more to the map.

  • We`ll start in West Columbia, South Carolina, with the Bulldogs from the Glen Forest school.

  • Over in Indianapolis, Indiana, we`re checking in with the students at the Unique East Home School Coop.

  • And finally, the Silver Eagles from Hodgson Vocational Technical High in Newark, Delaware.

  • Some stores employ security guards to keep customers safe.

  • This night watchman, not on the payroll, and I doubt customer safety is the first thing on his mind.

  • The gator wandered up to the front doors of a Wal-Mart in Florida early Sunday morning.

  • Authorities said hung out for about an hour before making its way back to a pond behind the store.

  • You might have come across some reptiles before, but probably not anything on that scales.

  • The store might consider putting up some preventive measures, like a gate or a fence, but that`s a tale for another day.

  • Hope you enjoy the rest of this day. For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I`m Carl Azuz.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Bringing stories from around the world right to your classroom. This is CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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2013年10月21日 - CNN学生ニュース(字幕付き (October 21, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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