Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Say you're shopping in this Armani store in Hong Kong.

  • Then your friend calls. You answer the phone and leave the store.

  • For Armani, you're a lost customer.

  • But then the next day you're sitting at work, looking at your phone,

  • and you get an Armani ad reminding you of your visit from yesterday.

  • Wait, what happened here?

  • But I didn't give any information. I didn't register my name. I didn't register for an app.

  • If you have a smartphone, your phone is constantly

  • sending and collecting different signals, from GPS, wifi and so on.

  • So we use those signals to understand your location.

  • That's Miron Mironiuk.

  • He started a company called Cosmose, which tracks shoppers offline

  • and helps stores market to them online.

  • We don't need you to install an app. We don't need you to connect to wifi or bluetooth.

  • Cosmose is in more than 100,000 stores, in which it can track location-based activity 24/7.

  • And it's tracked more than one billion smartphones.

  • It's so precise, it can narrow down where you stood in a store to about a six-foot radius.

  • We can tell that someone was trying the makeup, someone was trying the fragrance.

  • And six feet is really just a few steps.

  • Yes, maybe just like two steps.

  • Cosmose doesn't actually install anything in the store.

  • But they do need to physically visit, so they can map the space and understand the wifi signals in different areas.

  • Cosmose is able to know your movements because it buys the data from the apps

  • that you've already given permission to to know your location.

  • And it's not hard.

  • 400,000 apps are sharing data with Cosmose,

  • on average seven apps have permission for location-tracking on a typical smartphone in China.

  • So a store can now track a phone that was in the fitting room but never made it to the cash register.

  • Then using anonymous IDs based on your previous locations,

  • ads are purchased on the likes of Facebook, Google and WeChat.

  • And that's how you get those targeted ads.

  • The ad on your phone could prompt you to buy online or go back to the store.

  • Your technology can also track if I stood here and then went across the mall to your competitor.

  • Exactly, exactly.

  • If I'm a user, I come to a luxury store like this and then go to McDonald's for lunch,

  • what does your data make of that?

  • We probably think that you are just window shopping,

  • maybe you will go online and try to get the same luxury clothes cheaper.

  • Cosmose is active in China, Japan, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

  • Their clients include Burberry, L'Oreal and Budweiser,

  • and Miron says many of his clients want to expand into the U.S. next.

  • Lubomira Rochet is the Chief Digital Officer for L'Oreal and based in Paris.

  • The story goes, you visited a store, one of our stores for example,

  • and then you will receive like the day after in your feed on Facebook or WeChat

  • an online ad that is super personalized to the experience you just had with the brand

  • and then encouraging you to go back to the store, in order to buy.

  • Lubomira says that by doing this, they've seen an increase

  • in converting offline casual shoppers into actual buyers.

  • But, this technology of tracking people offline is still in its early days.

  • Critics might say that this is quite invasive

  • to track someone offline and then start marketing to them online.

  • We don't collect any personal data.

  • We only analyze groups of anonymized IDs and for sure

  • this new technology will create new questions but I can assure you that we respect privacy.

  • In a U.S.-focused report, the New York Times found that at least 75 companies are receiving

  • anonymous location data from users who have enabled-location services.

  • Sales of location-targeted advertising is estimated to reach $21 billion this year.

  • Mark Lunt is a retail expert based in Hong Kong and working with clients across industries in Asia.

  • He says people are increasingly okay to give up some privacy, in favor of convenience.

  • That Google knows where you are, where you're going, where you've been,

  • but the tradeoff is Google maps is a great product.

  • And it allows me to get from here, to here, it allows me to predict how long it's going to take if I'm in a car.

  • He refers to it as privacy fatigue, where users become apathetic

  • to the fact that they're information is being tracked.

  • Often you look at an app and you think, "why on earth does that app need to have access to my contacts,

  • to my history, to my shoe size, to everything else that's in there somewhere.

  • Just think, "Well they probably know it all already, so off we go."

  • But this is different.

  • You're not signing up for an app.

  • In fact, you're not really signing up for anything at all.

  • The technology behind Cosmose is part of a broader trend in retail

  • that's bridging the experiences of shopping both online and offline.

  • Our obsession is to really address the consumer, sometimes he will start offline, sometimes

  • he would start online, at the end of the day we really want to merge those two worlds.

  • Each person I talk to for this story, at some point brings up the importance of China.

  • China really does lead the world, so it's very much a case of, look at what's happening

  • in China because it'll be happening in a shopping mall near you fairly soon.

  • In 2017, 20 percent of retail sales came from online shopping in China.

  • Compare that to just 12 percent in the U.S.

  • And in the four preceding years, China saw a 33 percent growth in online sales penetration,

  • compared to just 11 percent in the U.S. and 10 percent in the U.K.

  • Today in China, we don't say e-commerce and offline or brick-and-mortar, we just say commerce.

  • American and European companies will find it really hard to compete with Chinese companies,

  • because the Chinese are just much, much faster and they're not arrogant.

  • But China's advancement isn't just about technology, it also comes down to culture, too.

  • One would have to say that privacy is much more highly valued by the Europeans than it is by the Chinese.

  • Over time it's hard to see the barriers to privacy going up, isn't it, from where they are now.

  • And location tracking through your cell phone might just be the beginning.

  • Lunt says some businesses are now using facial recognition technology, too.

  • There's a number of ways they can identify you as an individual and if they've been tracking

  • your online behavior they can influence you appropriately when you're in the store.

Say you're shopping in this Armani store in Hong Kong.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

店舗があなたの一挙手一投足を追跡し始めています|CNBCレポート (Stores are starting to track your every move | CNBC Reports)

  • 82 4
    PENG に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語