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  • We are in Tallinn, the capital of Estonia.

  • The Baltic country is home to 1.3 million people, and to one of the most advanced digital societies in the world.

  • From e-residency to online voting to national ID cards,

  • we're here to see how Estonia could be a blueprint for other countries looking to go digital.

  • For our first stop, we went straight to the top with a visit to Estonia's President Kersti Kaljulaid.

  • If you could describe Estonia's digital society to someone who has maybe

  • never heard of it before, what would you say?

  • You can apply for a passport, you can apply for a driver's license,

  • you can sell your car and buy a car online, register it online.

  • So most of the services in Estonia when it concerns public service is digital.

  • We have a generation who has grown up knowing that you communicate digitally.

  • Estonians realized because they embraced internet and technology,

  • business and everything, is going to move to the internet.

  • Instead of just having an offline ID card, you also need something that works online.

  • So we are inside the showroom of e-Estonia which showcases a lot of the country's digital solutions.

  • We're going to take a look at the electronic ID and digital signatures.

  • Every Estonian is issued a digital ID.

  • Physical ID cards are paired with digital signatures that citizens use to pay taxes,

  • vote, do online banking and access their healthcare records.

  • For a small country, the impact of the digital signatures has been big,

  • saving the government an estimated two percent of GDP per year in salaries and expenses.

  • Estonia says 99 percent of its public services are available online 24/7.

  • It takes under five minutes to fill out taxes online, around one-third of citizens vote online

  • and 99 percent of prescriptions are issued electronically.

  • Health records can be shared among doctors using a single electronic file

  • that the owner can see at any point in time, too.

  • So, here you can see a list of doctors that I have been in treatment with.

  • Everything that regards your health record, your health this is here.

  • Another big feature of Estonia's digital society is the e-residency program.

  • This basically allows you to start a company here in Estonia even if you're not a resident.

  • E-residents can benefit from the European Union's single market without actually living in the EU.

  • Estonia was the first country in the world to offer e-residency and so far more than

  • 50,000 people have applied for the program since it launched in 2014.

  • So we are on our way to meet Taavi Kotka.

  • Taavi is a well-known presence in Estonia as the country's first Chief Information Officer.

  • We just started to think about it, how can we increase the people connected to Estonia.

  • We had to approach this question differently

  • and we took the approach that okay, why not connect them digitally?

  • So how did Estonia become so high-tech?

  • It all started in 1991 when Estonia gained independence from the Soviet Union.

  • The government embarked on a series of fast track reforms to modernize the economy

  • and it saw investments in technology as a key way to boost economic growth.

  • By 2000 all schools were equipped with computers,

  • and today children as young as seven years old learn how to code.

  • The government also offered free computer training to 10 percent of the adult population.

  • These efforts helped raise the percentage of Estonians who use the internet

  • from 29 percent in the year 2000 to an impressive 91% in 2016.

  • Skype was one of Estonia's early tech success stories.

  • The video chatting company, which was bought by Microsoft, was founded here in 2003.

  • Estonia claims it's home to more tech unicorns, which are private companies valued at more than $1 billion,

  • per capita than any other small country in the world.

  • Its recent unicorns include payments company Transferwise and Uber competitor Taxify.

  • Other companies focusing on everything from blockchain to organic food

  • are now vying to be the next Estonian unicorn.

  • I think the environment that is set up right now is very friendly and I hope they keep it this way.

  • So the road to a digital society here in Estonia hasn't been without bumps along the way.

  • In 2007, the country suffered a massive cyber attack

  • which forced the government to take steps toward protecting online security.

  • Estonia helped launch a branch of NATO devoted to fighting similar attacks.

  • The government created a data embassy in Luxembourg where it stores a copy of all of its data.

  • And schools teachcyber hygienestarting in elementary school.

  • The efforts haven't stopped cyberattacks altogether,

  • but today many people here are convinced their data is safer online than on pen and paper.

  • You actually see who has access to the data, what data was collected, why, how it was used.

  • And if you have an ability to control it, you can cover it, you can delete it, etc,

  • it actually gives you more privacy.

  • One thing we learned about Estonia's digital society, it's not enough just to keep up with technology.

  • As its population ages, Estonia is trying to lure in high-skilled workers like digital nomads,

  • remote workers who use technology to do their jobs anywhere around the world.

  • We're heading in to meet Karoli Hindricks.

  • She's the CEO of a company called Jobbattical, she is working with Killu Vantsi from the

  • Estonian Interior Ministry to develop what would be the world's first digital nomad visa.

  • It's one example of a public- private partnership at work.

  • It really reflects what our whole immigration policy is about.

  • We want to attract the talented people, entrepreneurs that are beneficial to our society to our economy.

  • Do you see it as important to be attracting skilled workers?

  • The loud speaker of the world, which means, the United States right now, or Brexit,

  • it kind of seems that loud is closing down but there's a lot of countries that are actually

  • thinking about how to make it easier, how to attract people.

  • Where people will move will very much define the failure or success of an economy, right?

  • So we're seeing how initiatives like the digital nomad visa and e-residency

  • are encouraging startups and entrepreneurs here in Estonia.

  • This is the Tehnopol complex, it's home to more than 200 tech companies.

  • Priit Kruus founded a health tech company whose app helps detect early stages of skin cancer.

  • The small environment, the digital environment, people are very open for new innovations.

  • As a market size it's not that big so you really have to think big at the very first step

  • and think of your growth plans into other countries, and other continents even.

  • Replicating Estonia's digital success in bigger, more diverse countries, will be easier said than done.

  • After all, the entire population here is roughly equivalent to that of Dallas.

  • But in a world that's only getting more digital,

  • there are a lot of lessons we can learn from this glimpse into the future.

  • Hey guys, Elizabeth here, coming to you from Estonia. Thanks so much for watching.

  • Be sure to check out more of our videos over here.

  • We're also always taking any ideas that you have for stories so leave them in the comments section.

  • And while you're there, subscribe to our channel. See you later!

We are in Tallinn, the capital of Estonia.

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エストニアはいかにして世界最先端のデジタル社会になったか|CNBCレポート (How Estonia became one of the world's most advanced digital societies | CNBC Reports)

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    kstmasa に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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