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  • The U.S. is home to many of

  • the world's most valuable companies.

  • It's often thought of

  • as the land of opportunity

  • for anyone with a big vision.

  • It's been home to cutting-edge inventions like

  • the light bulb,

  • the airplane,

  • the iPhone,

  • but when it comes to its infrastructure

  • a different story is slowly unfolding.

  • The top 10 fastest train systems in the world:

  • None are in the U.S.

  • The world's tallest buildings:

  • The U.S. doesn't even make top 5,

  • and the 7 longest bridges in the world:

  • They're all in Asia.

  • Let's rewind and remember what historically

  • made the U.S. ahead of its time.

  • First, the bridges.

  • The Brooklyn Bridge was the first steel wire

  • suspension bridge ever constructed.

  • When it first opened it was the longest

  • suspension bridge in the world.

  • In fact, it was twice as long as

  • any other of its time and

  • built to sustain an unprecedented

  • amount of weight.

  • The Golden Gate Bridge,

  • well it opened in 1937,

  • and for a few years it was the world's

  • largest suspension bridge span.

  • Then there's the skyscrapers.

  • The Empire State Building was the world's

  • tallest building for almost 40 years.

  • It was surpassed by the

  • World Trade Center's North Tower,

  • soon after it was taken over

  • by Chicago's Sears Tower.

  • The public transit systems.

  • More than 1,000 miles of

  • train tracks connected many

  • different parts of Los Angeles

  • and for a time it was even

  • recognized as the best public

  • transportation system on the planet.

  • And even irrigation.

  • Los Angeles created a 233 mile

  • water duct back in 1913,

  • and at the time,

  • it would come to be known as

  • the world's largest water project in history.

  • And even though the city's population

  • was only 300,000 at the time

  • the system could supply enough water

  • for a population of several million,

  • which ultimately would come to enable

  • the region's explosive growth

  • that was soon to come.

  • Fast forward to today,

  • many of these titles

  • have not only been dethroned,

  • but some cities are in need of major help.

  • In fact, an 800 million emergency rescue plan

  • was recently approved for New York City's

  • troubled subway system.

  • Just take a look at the

  • World Economic Forum's list of countries

  • with the best infrastructure,

  • which judged economies based on their

  • transport system, power,

  • and communications networks.

  • The U.S. doesn't even make the top 10.

  • The top 3: Hong Kong,

  • Singapore and the Netherlands.

  • Now imagine for a second that a country

  • was like a company.

  • Even with massive revenues,

  • a big company often has a harder

  • time innovating than say, a start-up.

  • A corporation's goal after all

  • is to maximize profits while minimizing risks,

  • but if a company isn't able to innovate,

  • you could end up with a Blockbuster or Kodak,

  • both of which dominated their industries

  • until the lack of ability to adapt

  • meant they would come to fail.

  • Take even a relatively new company,

  • like Facebook.

  • A large portion of its innovation

  • is coming through acquisitions

  • of companies including

  • Instagram,

  • WhatsApp,

  • and Oculus.

  • Now many of the locations

  • leading the way in infrastructure

  • are building smart cities

  • and they tend to be smaller.

  • Think the United Arab Emirates' Dubai,

  • and city-state Singapore.

  • The population of the United States

  • is 323.1 million.

  • It has an extensive layer of government,

  • including county, local, state,

  • federal governments, and many agencies.

  • Now of course many of the world's

  • most ambitious ideas are

  • coming out of the U.S.

  • But ideation and execution are

  • two different things.

  • Take for instance Elon Musk's Hyperloop.

  • The first proposed Hyperloop was between

  • here in San Francisco and Los Angeles.

  • The 2013 proposal would

  • take a five hour drive

  • and turn it into about a

  • 35 minute ride on a high-speed rail.

  • But a few years after that initial proposal,

  • the first Hyperloop isn't likely to be here.

  • But instead it likely could launch in

  • the UAE in 2020,

  • connecting Dubai and Abu Dhabi,

  • home of titles like,

  • the world's tallest building

  • and the world's largest indoor theme park.

  • So if innovation tends to come

  • from a nimble team, company,

  • and even country,

  • is the United States just too big to innovate?

The U.S. is home to many of

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米国はイノベーションを起こすには大きすぎる?| CNBCが解説 (Is the U.S. too big to innovate? | CNBC Explains)

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    PENG に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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