Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Translator: Joseph Geni Reviewer: Krystian Aparta

    翻訳者。ジョセフ・ジェニ レビュアーKrystian Aparta

  • So a friend of mine was riding in a taxi to the airport the other day,

    そこで先日、友人がタクシーに乗って空港まで行っていました。

  • and on the way, she was chatting with the taxi driver,

    と途中でタクシーの運転手さんと談笑していた。

  • and he said to her, with total sincerity,

    と、彼は誠心誠意を込めて彼女に言った。

  • "I can tell you are a really good person."

    "あなたは本当に良い人だと思う"

  • And when she told me this story later,

    後日、彼女がこんな話をしてくれた時

  • she said she couldn't believe how good it made her feel,

    彼女は、それが彼女の気分を良くしたことが信じられないと言っていました。

  • that it meant a lot to her.

    それは彼女にとって大きな意味があると

  • Now that may seem like a strong reaction from my friend

    今は友人の反応が強いように見えるかもしれませんが

  • to the words of a total stranger,

    見ず知らずの人の言葉に

  • but she's not alone.

    でも彼女は一人じゃない

  • I'm a social scientist.

    私は社会科学者です。

  • I study the psychology of good people,

    良い人の心理学を勉強しています。

  • and research in my field says many of us care deeply

    と私の分野の研究では、私たちの多くが深く気にしていると言われています。

  • about feeling like a good person and being seen as a good person.

    良い人と思われていると感じていることと、良い人として見られていることについて

  • Now, your definition of "good person" and your definition of "good person"

    さて、あなたの "良い人 "の定義と "良い人 "の定義は?

  • and maybe the taxi driver's definition of "good person" --

    そして、タクシーの運転手の「いい人」の定義は、たぶん

  • we may not all have the same definition,

    全員が同じ定義ではないかもしれません。

  • but within whatever our definition is,

    しかし、私たちの定義が何であれ、その範囲内で。

  • that moral identity is important to many of us.

    道徳的なアイデンティティは多くの人にとって重要であることを

  • Now, if somebody challenges it, like they question us for a joke we tell,

    誰かがそれに挑戦してきたら...冗談のために質問されるように...私たちはそれを話す。

  • or maybe we say our workforce is homogenous,

    というか、労働力は同質と言ってもいいかもしれません。

  • or a slippery business expense,

    または、ヌルヌルした事業費。

  • we go into red-zone defensiveness a lot of the time.

    レッドゾーンのディフェンスに入ることが多いです。

  • I mean, sometimes we call out

    とか、たまに声をかけることがありますが

  • all the ways in which we help people from marginalized groups,

    疎外されたグループの人々を支援するあらゆる方法。

  • or we donate to charity,

    慈善団体に寄付しています。

  • or the hours we volunteer to nonprofits.

    または非営利団体へのボランティア活動の時間。

  • We work to protect that good person identity.

    その良い人のアイデンティティを守るために活動しています。

  • It's important to many of us.

    多くの人にとって重要なことです。

  • But what if I told you this?

    でも、こんなことを言ったらどうなるんだろう?

  • What if I told you that our attachment to being good people

    善人であることへの執着があるとしたら?

  • is getting in the way of us being better people?

    より良い人間になるための邪魔をしているのでしょうか?

  • What if I told you that our definition of "good person" is so narrow,

    私たちの「良い人」の定義があまりにも狭いと言ったらどうでしょう。

  • it's scientifically impossible to meet?

    科学的に不可能なのか?

  • And what if I told you the path to being better people

    そして、より良い人間になるための道を教えてあげるとしたら?

  • just begins with letting go of being a good person?

    ただ、良い人であることを手放すことから始まるのか?

  • Now, let me tell you a little bit about the research

    では、研究内容について少しお話します。

  • about how the human mind works

    人間の心の働きについて

  • to explain.

    を説明してください。

  • The brain relies on shortcuts to do a lot of its work.

    脳はショートカットに頼って仕事をしています。

  • That means a lot of the time,

    ということが多いですね。

  • your mental processes are taking place outside of your awareness,

    あなたの精神的なプロセスは、あなたの意識の外で行われています。

  • like in low-battery, low-power mode in the back of your mind.

    心の奥で低バッテリー、低電力モードの時のように

  • That's, in fact, the premise of bounded rationality.

    それは、実際には、制限された合理性の前提です。

  • Bounded rationality is the Nobel Prize-winning idea

    境界付き合理性はノーベル賞受賞のアイデア

  • that the human mind has limited storage resources,

    人間の心の記憶力には限りがあるということ

  • limited processing power,

    処理能力が限られています。

  • and as a result, it relies on shortcuts to do a lot of its work.

    その結果、多くの仕事をショートカットに頼ってしまいます。

  • So for example,

    だから例えば

  • some scientists estimate that in any given moment ...

    と見積もっている科学者もいる。

  • Better, better click, right? There we go.

    より良い、より良いクリック、でしょう?これでいいわ

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • At any given moment,

    どんな時でも

  • 11 million pieces of information are coming into your mind.

    1,100万件の情報があなたの頭の中に入ってきます。

  • Eleven million.

    1,100万

  • And only 40 of them are being processed consciously.

    しかも意識的に処理しているのは40人だけ。

  • So 11 million, 40.

    だから1100万、40。

  • I mean, has this ever happened to you?

    というか、今までにもこんなことがあったのか?

  • Have you ever had a really busy day at work,

    仕事で本当に忙しい日々を送っていたことはありませんか?

  • and you drive home,

    車で帰宅するんだ

  • and when you get in the door,

    と玄関に入ると

  • you realize you don't even remember the drive home,

    帰りのドライブを覚えていないことに気づく。

  • like whether you had green lights or red lights.

    緑の光があったか赤の光があったかのように

  • You don't even remember. You were on autopilot.

    覚えてないんだなあなたは自動操縦していたのよ

  • Or have you ever opened the fridge,

    冷蔵庫を開けたことがないのか

  • looked for the butter,

    バターを探しました。

  • swore there is no butter,

    バターはないと誓った

  • and then realized the butter was right in front of you the whole time?

    バターが目の前にあることに気付いたのか?

  • These are the kinds of "whoops" moments that make us giggle,

    これらは、私たちを笑わせてくれる「おっと」の瞬間の種類です。

  • and this is what happens in a brain

    と、脳内ではこうなっている

  • that can handle 11 million pieces of information coming in

    1100万件の情報を扱うことができる

  • with only 40 being processed consciously.

    意識的に処理されているのは40個だけです。

  • That's the bounded part of bounded rationality.

    それが境界合理性の境界部分です。

  • This work on bounded rationality

    束縛された合理性に関する本研究

  • is what's inspired work I've done with my collaborators

    これは、私が協力者と一緒にやった仕事からインスピレーションを得たものです。

  • Max Bazerman and Mahzarin Banaji,

    マックス・バザマンとマフザリン・バナージ。

  • on what we call bounded ethicality.

    私たちが境界のある倫理性と呼ぶものについて

  • So it's the same premise as bounded rationality,

    だから、それは境界付き合理性と同じ前提なのです。

  • that we have a human mind that is bounded in some sort of way

    人の心には人の心があるということ

  • and relying on shortcuts,

    とショートカットに頼っています。

  • and that those shortcuts can sometimes lead us astray.

    そして、その近道は時に私たちを迷わせてしまうこともあるのです。

  • With bounded rationality,

    境界のある合理性を持って

  • perhaps it affects the cereal we buy in the grocery store,

    もしかしたら、スーパーで買うシリアルにも影響しているのかもしれません。

  • or the product we launch in the boardroom.

    または、役員室で発売する商品のことです。

  • With bounded ethicality, the human mind,

    縛られた倫理観で、人間の心を

  • the same human mind,

    同じ人間の心

  • is making decisions,

    が意思決定をしている。

  • and here, it's about who to hire next,

    そしてここでは、次に誰を雇うかということです。

  • or what joke to tell

    何の冗談か

  • or that slippery business decision.

    あるいは、そのツルツルした経営判断。

  • So let me give you an example of bounded ethicality at work.

    そこで、職場での束縛された倫理観の例を挙げてみましょう。

  • Unconscious bias is one place

    無意識のバイアスは一か所

  • where we see the effects of bounded ethicality.

    ここでは、束縛された倫理性の効果を見ることができます。

  • So unconscious bias refers to associations we have in our mind,

    つまり、無意識のバイアスとは、私たちが心の中で持っている連想のことを指しているのです。

  • the shortcuts your brain is using to organize information,

    脳が情報を整理するために使っているショートカット

  • very likely outside of your awareness,

    あなたの意識の外にある可能性が高い

  • not necessarily lining up with your conscious beliefs.

    意識的な信念に沿っているとは限りません。

  • Researchers Nosek, Banaji and Greenwald

    研究者 ノセック、バナージ、グリーンワルド

  • have looked at data from millions of people,

    何百万人もの人のデータを見てきました。

  • and what they've found is, for example,

    と、彼らが見つけたものは、例えば、です。

  • most white Americans can more quickly and easily

    ほとんどの白人アメリカ人は、より迅速かつ容易に

  • associate white people and good things

    白人と善人を結びつける

  • than black people and good things,

    黒人や良いことよりも

  • and most men and women can more quickly and easily associate

    とほとんどの男性と女性は、より迅速かつ容易に関連付けることができます。

  • men and science than women and science.

    女と科学よりも男と科学

  • And these associations don't necessarily line up

    そして、これらの協会は必ずしも一致していません。

  • with what people consciously think.

    人が意識的に考えていることと

  • They may have very egalitarian views, in fact.

    実際、彼らは非常に平等主義的な考えを持っているのかもしれません。

  • So sometimes, that 11 million and that 40 just don't line up.

    だから時々、1100万と4000万が一致しないことがあります。

  • And here's another example:

    そして、ここにもう一つの例があります。

  • conflicts of interest.

    利害の衝突

  • So we tend to underestimate how much a small gift --

    だから私たちは小さな贈り物を過小評価する傾向があります。

  • imagine a ballpoint pen or dinner --

    ボールペンや夕食を想像する

  • how much that small gift can affect our decision making.

    その小さな贈り物が、私たちの意思決定にどれほどの影響を与えるか。

  • We don't realize that our mind is unconsciously lining up evidence

    私たちは、私たちの心が無意識のうちに証拠を並べていることに気づかない

  • to support the point of view of the gift-giver,

    贈る側の視点をサポートするために

  • no matter how hard we're consciously trying to be objective and professional.

    どんなに頑張っても、意識的に客観的でプロフェッショナルな存在になろうとしています。

  • We also see bounded ethicality --

    私たちはまた、境界のある倫理観も見ています。

  • despite our attachment to being good people,

    良い人であることに執着しているにもかかわらず

  • we still make mistakes,

    私たちはまだ間違いを犯しています。

  • and we make mistakes that sometimes hurt other people,

    と、時に他人を傷つけてしまうようなミスをしてしまいます。

  • that sometimes promote injustice,

    不正を助長することがあります。

  • despite our best attempts,

    私たちの最善の試みにもかかわらず

  • and we explain away our mistakes rather than learning from them.

    そして、そこから学ぶのではなく、自分の過ちを説明してしまうのです。

  • Like, for example,

    例えば

  • when I got an email from a female student in my class

    クラスの女子生徒からメールが来た時に

  • saying that a reading I had assigned,

    私が割り当てた読書のことを言って

  • a reading I had been assigning for years,

    何年も前から課題にしていた読書。

  • was sexist.

    は性差別的だった。

  • Or when I confused two students in my class

    クラスの二人の生徒を混乱させた時も

  • of the same race --

    同じ人種の

  • look nothing alike --

    似ても似つかぬ

  • when I confused them for each other

    互いを混同したとき

  • more than once, in front of everybody.

    みんなの前で一度以上

  • These kinds of mistakes send us, send me,

    この手のミスは、私たちを送ってくる、私を送ってくる。

  • into red-zone defensiveness.

    レッドゾーンの守備に

  • They leave us fighting for that good person identity.

    彼らは私たちを残して、その良い人のアイデンティティのために戦っています。

  • But the latest work that I've been doing on bounded ethicality with Mary Kern

    しかし、私がメアリー・カーンと一緒に行ってきた最新の仕事は、境界のある倫理性についてのものでした。

  • says that we're not only prone to mistakes --

    私たちは間違いを犯しやすいだけではないと言います。

  • that tendency towards mistakes depends on how close we are to that red zone.

    ミスの傾向は、レッドゾーンにどれだけ近づけるかにかかっています。

  • So most of the time, nobody's challenging our good person identity,

    だから、ほとんどの場合、誰も私たちの善人のアイデンティティに挑戦していません。

  • and so we're not thinking too much

    ということで、あまり深く考えずに

  • about the ethical implications of our decisions,

    私たちの決断の倫理的な意味合いについて

  • and our model shows that we're then spiraling

    そして、我々のモデルは、我々がスパイラルしていることを示しています。

  • towards less and less ethical behavior most of the time.

    ほとんどの場合、倫理的な行動が少なくなる傾向にあります。

  • On the other hand, somebody might challenge our identity,

    一方で、誰かが私たちのアイデンティティに挑戦するかもしれません。

  • or, upon reflection, we may be challenging it ourselves.

    あるいは、反省した上で、私たち自身がそれに挑戦しているのかもしれません。

  • So the ethical implications of our decisions become really salient,

    だから、私たちの決断の倫理的な意味合いは、本当に顕著になります。

  • and in those cases, we spiral towards more and more good person behavior,

    と、そういう場合は、どんどん良い人の行動に向かってスパイラルしていきます。

  • or, to be more precise,

    というか、もっと正確に言うと

  • towards more and more behavior that makes us feel like a good person,

    と感じさせる行動が増えていく方向へ。

  • which isn't always the same, of course.

    もちろん、いつも同じとは限りません。

  • The idea with bounded ethicality

    縛られた倫理観を持つ考え方

  • is that we are perhaps overestimating

    を過大評価しているのではないかということです。

  • the importance our inner compass is playing in our ethical decisions.

    私たちの内なるコンパスが私たちの倫理的な意思決定において重要な役割を果たしています。

  • We perhaps are overestimating how much our self-interest

    私たちはおそらく、私たちの利己心を過大評価しすぎているのではないでしょうか。

  • is driving our decisions,

    が私たちの意思決定の原動力となっています。

  • and perhaps we don't realize how much our self-view as a good person

    と、おそらく私たちはドン'tは、善人としての私たちの自己評価をどのくらい実現しています

  • is affecting our behavior,

    が私たちの行動に影響を与えています。

  • that in fact, we're working so hard to protect that good person identity,

    その良い人のアイデンティティを守るために、私たちは必死に努力しているのです。

  • to keep out of that red zone,

    レッドゾーンに入らないように

  • that we're not actually giving ourselves space to learn from our mistakes

    私たちは実際に自分自身の過ちから学ぶためのスペースを与えていないことを

  • and actually be better people.

    と、実際により良い人間になることができます。

  • It's perhaps because we expect it to be easy.

    それは、私たちが簡単なことを期待しているからかもしれません。

  • We have this definition of good person that's either-or.

    私たちは、どちらか一方の善人の定義を持っています。

  • Either you are a good person or you're not.

    あなたが良い人か、そうでないかのどちらかです。

  • Either you have integrity or you don't.

    誠実さを持っているか、持っていないかのどちらかです。

  • Either you are a racist or a sexist or a homophobe or you're not.

    差別主義者か性差別者かホモフォビアかどっちかだよ。

  • And in this either-or definition, there's no room to grow.

    そして、このどちらか一方の定義では、成長する余地はありません。

  • And by the way,

    で、ついでに。

  • this is not what we do in most parts of our lives.

    これは私たちの生活のほとんどの部分でやっていることではありません。

  • Life, if you needed to learn accounting,

    人生、会計を学ぶ必要があったなら

  • you would take an accounting class,

    会計の授業を受けることになります。

  • or if you become a parent,

    または親になった場合。

  • we pick up a book and we read about it.

    本を手に取って読んでいます。

  • We talk to experts,

    専門家に話を聞く。

  • we learn from our mistakes,

    私たちは失敗から学ぶ

  • we update our knowledge,

    知識を更新しています。

  • we just keep getting better.

    私たちは良くなり続けています。

  • But when it comes to being a good person,

    でも、いい人になると

  • we think it's something we're just supposed to know,

    私たちは、それは私たちが知っているはずのことだと思っています。

  • we're just supposed to do,

    私たちは、ただやるだけです。

  • without the benefit of effort or growth.

    努力や成長の恩恵を受けずに

  • So what I've been thinking about

    だから、私が考えていたことは

  • is what if we were to just forget about being good people,

    は、良い人であることを忘れてしまうとどうなるかということです。

  • just let it go,

    放っておいて

  • and instead, set a higher standard,

    と、その代わりに、より高い基準を設定します。

  • a higher standard of being a good-ish person?

    偉そうな人の方が基準が高い?

  • A good-ish person absolutely still makes mistakes.

    良い人は絶対に今でもミスをします。

  • As a good-ish person, I'm making them all the time.

    良かれと思って作っている私としては、いつも作っています。

  • But as a good-ish person, I'm trying to learn from them, own them.

    しかし、私は良い人として、彼らから学び、彼らを所有しようとしています。

  • I expect them and I go after them.

    期待して追いかけます。

  • I understand there are costs to these mistakes.

    このようなミスにはコストがかかることは理解しています。

  • When it comes to issues like ethics and bias and diversity and inclusion,

    倫理やバイアス、ダイバーシティやインクルージョンのような問題になると

  • there are real costs to real people,

    現実の人には実費がかかる

  • and I accept that.

    と私は受け入れます。

  • As a good-ish person, in fact,

    実際、いいとこ取りの人として。

  • I become better at noticing my own mistakes.

    自分のミスに気づくのが上手になる。

  • I don't wait for people to point them out.

    人に指摘されるのを待っているわけではない。

  • I practice finding them,

    見つける練習をしています。

  • and as a result ...

    その結果

  • Sure, sometimes it can be embarrassing,

    確かに、たまに恥ずかしいこともありますよね。

  • it can be uncomfortable.

    不快になることがあります。

  • We put ourselves in a vulnerable place, sometimes.

    私たちは時々、自分自身を脆弱な場所に置きます。

  • But through all that vulnerability,

    しかし、その脆弱性を通した

  • just like in everything else we've tried to ever get better at,

    他のすべてのことと同じように、私たちはより良いものにしようとしてきました。

  • we see progress.

    私たちは進歩を見ています。

  • We see growth.

    我々は成長を見ている。

  • We allow ourselves to get better.

    私たちは自分自身が良くなることを許しています。

  • Why wouldn't we give ourselves that?

    なぜ自分自身にそれを与えないのでしょうか?

  • In every other part of our lives, we give ourselves room to grow --

    私たちの生活の他のすべての部分では、我々は自分自身が成長する余地を与える - 。

  • except in this one, where it matters most.

    この中では一番重要なことだが

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

Translator: Joseph Geni Reviewer: Krystian Aparta

翻訳者。ジョセフ・ジェニ レビュアーKrystian Aparta

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

B1 中級 日本語 倫理 良い 境界 意識 定義 アイデンティティ

良い人」であることを手放して、より良い人になる方法|ドリー・チュー

  • 1502 32
    NaiBoLiao   に公開 2019 年 01 月 16 日
動画の中の単語

前のバージョンに戻す