Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • How can we get people to do more good,

    どうしたらもっと良いことをしてもらえるのか。

  • to go to the polls, give to charity, conserve resources,

    投票に行ったり、慈善事業に寄付したり、資源を節約したり。

  • or even to do something as simple as washing their mugs at work

    仕事場でマグカップを洗うような簡単なことをするためにも

  • so that the sink isn't always full of dirty dishes?

    シンクは常に汚れた皿でいっぱいにならないように?

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • When I first started working on this problem,

    私がこの問題に取り組み始めた頃

  • I collaborated with a power company

    電力会社とコラボした

  • to recruit customers for a program that prevents blackouts

    停電を防ぐプログラムの顧客を募集するために

  • by reducing energy demand during peaks.

    ピーク時のエネルギー需要を削減することで

  • The program is based on a tried-and-true technology.

    試行錯誤してきた技術をベースにしています。

  • It's one the Obama administration even called

    それは、オバマ政権が

  • "the cornerstone to modernizing America's electrical grid."

    "アメリカの電力網を近代化する礎となる"

  • But, like so many great technological solutions,

    しかし、多くの偉大な技術的解決策のように

  • it has a key weakness:

    それには重要な弱点がある

  • people.

    の人たちのことを指しています。

  • People need to sign up.

    人は登録が必要です。

  • To try to get people to sign up, the power company sent them a nice letter,

    サインをしてもらおうと、電力会社から素敵な手紙が送られてきました。

  • told them about all the program's benefits,

    と、プログラムのメリットを話してくれました。

  • and it asked them to call into a hotline if they were interested.

    と、興味があればホットラインに電話してくれと頼まれました。

  • Those letters went out,

    手紙は出て行った

  • but the phones, they were silent.

    でも電話は無音だった

  • So when we got involved, we suggested one small change.

    そこで、私たちが関わったときに、一つの小さな変化を提案しました。

  • Instead of that hotline,

    そのホットラインの代わりに

  • we suggested that they use sign-up sheets that they'd post near the mailboxes

    私たちは、郵便受けの近くに貼るサインアップシートを使うことを提案しました。

  • in people's buildings.

    人々の建物の中で。

  • This tripled participation.

    これで参加人数が3倍になりました。

  • Why?

    なぜ?

  • Well, we all know people care deeply about what others think of them,

    まあ、人は他人がどう思っているかを深く気にしていることはみんな知っている。

  • that we try to be seen as generous and kind,

    私たちは寛大で親切な人と見られるように努めています。

  • and we try to avoid being seen as selfish or a mooch.

    と、わがままやムッチリと見られないようにしています。

  • Whether we are aware of it or not, this is a big part of why people do good,

    意識しているかどうかは別として、これは人が良いことをする理由の大きな部分を占めています。

  • and so small changes that give people more credit for doing good,

    と、良いことをしている人にもっと信用を与えるような小さな変化をしています。

  • those changes can make a really big difference.

    これらの変更は、本当に大きな違いをもたらすことができます。

  • Small changes like switching from a hotline,

    ホットラインからの切り替えのような小さな変更。

  • where nobody will ever find out about your good deed,

    あなたの善行を誰にも知られることはありません。

  • to a sign-up sheet

    サインアップシートに

  • where anyone who walks by can see your name.

    通りすがりの人が名前を見られるところ。

  • In our collaborations with governments, nonprofits, companies,

    政府、非営利団体、企業とのコラボレーションでは

  • when we're trying to get people to do more good,

    人々にもっと良いことをしてもらおうとしているとき。

  • we harness the power of reputations.

    私たちは評判の力を利用しています。

  • And we have a simple checklist for this.

    そして、そのための簡単なチェックリストがあります。

  • And in fact, you already know the first item on that checklist.

    そして実際には、そのチェックリストの最初の項目はすでに知っているはずです。

  • It's to increase observability,

    観測性を高めるためです。

  • to make sure people find out about good deeds.

    善行に気づかせるために。

  • Now, wait a minute, I know some of you are probably thinking,

    さて、ちょっと待ってください、あなたの中には、おそらく考えている人がいると思います。

  • there's no way people here thought,

    ここの人たちが考えているわけがない。

  • "Oh, well, now that I'm getting credit for my good deed,

    "おやおや、これで私の善行が認められたわけだ。

  • now it's totally worth it."

    "今はそれだけの価値がある"

  • And you're right.

    そして、あなたの言う通りです。

  • Usually, people don't.

    普通の人はしませんよね。

  • Rather, when they're making decisions in private,

    むしろ、プライベートで決断しているときに。

  • they worry about their own problems,

    彼らは自分たちの問題を心配しています。

  • about what to put on the table for dinner or how to pay their bills on time.

    夕食のテーブルの上に何を置くか、またはどのように彼らの請求書を時間通りに支払う方法について。

  • But, when we make their decision more observable,

    しかし、彼らの判断をより観察可能なものにすると

  • they start to attend more to the opportunity to do good.

    彼らは良いことをする機会に、より多くの出席を開始します。

  • In other words, what's so powerful about our approach

    言い換えれば、私たちのアプローチの何がそんなに強力なのか?

  • is that it could turn on people's existing desire to do good,

    それは、人々の既存の良いことをしたいという願望を覆すことができるということです。

  • in this case, to help to prevent a blackout.

    この場合は、ブラックアウトを防ぐために

  • Back to observability.

    観察性に戻る。

  • I want to give you another example.

    もう一つの例を挙げてみたいと思います。

  • This one is from a collaboration

    こちらはコラボの

  • with a nonprofit that gets out the vote,

    選挙権を得る非営利団体と

  • and it does this by sending hundreds of thousands of letters every election

    選挙のたびに何十万通もの手紙を送ることで これを実現しています

  • in order to remind people and try to motivate them to go to the polls.

    人々に思い出させ、投票に行くように動機づけようとするために。

  • We suggested adding the following sentence:

    以下の一文を加えることを提案しました。

  • "Someone may call you to find out about your experience at the polls."

    "誰かが電話をかけてくるかもしれない"

  • This sentence makes it feel more observable when you go to the polls,

    この文章を見ると、世論調査に行った時の方が観察力があるような気がします。

  • and it increased the effect of the letter by 50 percent.

    と、手紙の効果を50%アップさせてくれました。

  • Making the letter more effective reduced the cost of getting an additional vote

    手紙をより効果的なものにすることで、追加の投票権を得るためのコストが削減された

  • from 70 dollars down to about 40 dollars.

    70ドルから40ドルくらいまで下がりました。

  • Observability has been used to do things

    観察性を利用したことで

  • like get people to donate blood more frequently

    献血の頻度を上げるように

  • by listing the names of donors on local newsletters,

    地域のニュースレターに寄付者の名前を掲載することで、寄付者の名前を掲載することができます。

  • or to pay their taxes on time

    または税金を滞納している

  • by listing the names of delinquents on a public website.

    滞納者の名前を公開サイトに掲載することで

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • What about this example?

    この例はどうでしょうか?

  • Toyota got hundreds of thousands of people to buy a more fuel-efficient car

    トヨタは何十万人もの人に低燃費車を買ってもらった

  • by making the Prius so unique ...

    プリウスをユニークなものにすることで...

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • that their good deed was observable from a mile away.

    彼らの善行は1マイル離れた場所からも観察できた。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Alright, so observability is great,

    よし、だから観察力は素晴らしい。

  • but we all know, we've all seen

    でも、私たちはみんな知っています

  • people walk by an opportunity to do good.

    人は善行の機会に歩む。

  • They'll see somebody asking for money on the sidewalk

    彼らは歩道でお金を求めて誰かを見つけるだろう

  • and they'll pull out their phones and look really busy,

    と携帯電話を取り出して忙しそうにしています。

  • or they'll go to the museum and they'll waltz right on by the donation box.

    それとも博物館に行って募金箱のそばをワルツで歩くか

  • Imagine it's the holiday season

    想像してみてください。

  • and you're going to the supermarket, and there's a Salvation Army volunteer,

    スーパーマーケットに行くと、救世軍のボランティアがいます。

  • and he's ringing his bell.

    とベルを鳴らしています。

  • A few years ago, researchers in San Diego

    数年前、サンディエゴの研究者が

  • teamed up with a local chapter from the Salvation Army

    救世軍の地元支部と協力して

  • to try to find ways to increase donations.

    寄付金を増やす方法を模索しています。

  • What they found was kind of funny.

    彼らが見つけたものは、ちょっとしたおかしなものだった。

  • When the volunteer stood in front of just one door,

    ボランティアがたった一つの扉の前に立ったとき。

  • people would avoid giving by going out the other door.

    人は他のドアから出て行くことで、与えることを避けるだろう。

  • Why?

    なぜ?

  • Well, because they can always claim, "Oh, I didn't see the volunteer,"

    ボランティアを見ていないと主張できるからだ

  • or, "I wanted to get something from over there,"

    とか、「あっちのものが欲しくて」とか。

  • or, "That's where my car is."

    とか "そこに私の車がある "とか

  • In other words, there's lots of excuses.

    つまり、言い訳が多いということです。

  • And that brings us to the second item on our checklist:

    そして、チェックリストの2つ目の項目に移ります。

  • to eliminate excuses.

    言い訳をなくすために

  • In the case of the Salvation Army,

    救世軍の場合

  • eliminating excuses just means standing in front of both doors,

    言い訳を排除するということは、両方のドアの前に立っているということです。

  • and sure enough, when they did this,

    そして確かに、彼らがこれをした時

  • donations rose.

    寄付金が増えた。

  • But that's when things got kind of funny,

    でも、それはちょっと笑えた時だった。

  • even funnier.

    笑えます。

  • The researchers were out in the parking lot,

    研究員は駐車場に出ていた。

  • and they were counting people as they came in and out of the store,

    と店に出入りしながら人を数えていました。

  • and they noticed that when the volunteers stood in front of both doors,

    と、ボランティアが両方のドアの前に立った時に気付いたそうです。

  • people stopped coming out of the store at all.

    人が全く店から出てこなくなりました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Obviously, they were surprised by this, so they decided to look into it further,

    明らかにこれには驚いたので、さらに調べてみることにした。

  • and that's when they found that there was actually a third, smaller utility door

    その時、3つ目の小さなユーティリティードアがあることを発見しました。

  • usually used to take out the recycling --

    通常はリサイクル品の搬出に使用されますが--。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • and now people were going out that door in order to avoid the volunteers.

    そして今、人々はボランティアを避けるために、そのドアの外に出ようとしていました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • This teaches us an important lesson though.

    しかし、これは重要なことを教えてくれています。

  • When we're trying to eliminate excuses, we need to be very thorough,

    言い訳をなくそうとするときには、徹底的にやる必要があります。

  • because people are really creative in making them.

    なぜなら、人々は本当にクリエイティブに作っているからです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Alright, I want to switch to a setting

    さてさて、設定を切り替えたいと思います。

  • where excuses can have deadly consequences.

    言い訳が致命的な結果を招くところ

  • What if I told you that the world's deadliest infectious disease has a cure,

    世界で最も致命的な感染症には治療法があると言ったら?

  • in fact, that it's had one for 70 years,

    実際、それは70年間1つを持っていました。

  • a good one, one that works almost every time?

    良いものは、ほぼ毎回効果があるものですか?

  • It's incredible, but it's true.

    信じられないことですが、本当のことです。

  • The disease is tuberculosis.

    病気は結核です。

  • It infects some 10 million people a year,

    年間約1000万人に感染しています。

  • and it kills almost two million of them.

    200万人近く殺してしまう。

  • Like the blackout prevention program, we've got the solution.

    停電防止プログラムもそうですが、解決策はあります。

  • The problem is people.

    問題は人間です。

  • People need to take their medication

    人は薬を飲む必要がある

  • so that they're cured,

    そうすれば治ります。

  • and so that they don't get other people sick.

    と、彼らは他の人が病気にならないように。

  • For a few years now, we've been collaborating

    数年前から、私たちはコラボレーションをしています。

  • with a mobile health startup called Keheala

    モバイルヘルスのスタートアップ「Keheala」と

  • to support TB patients as they undergo treatment.

    結核患者の治療をサポートするために

  • Now, you have to understand, TB treatment, it's really tough.

    さて、結核の治療は本当に大変だということを理解してください。

  • We're talking about taking a really strong antibiotic

    本当に強い抗生物質の服用について話しています

  • every single day for six months or more.

    半年以上毎日

  • That antibiotic is so strong that it will make you feel sick.

    あの抗生物質が強すぎて気分が悪くなりそう。

  • It will make you feel nauseous and dizzy.

    吐き気がしたり、めまいがしたりします。

  • It will make your pee turn funny colors.

    おしっこが変な色になってしまいます。

  • It's also a problem because you have to go back to the clinic

    クリニックに戻らなければならないのも問題です。

  • about every week in order to get more pills,

    薬を増やすために毎週のように

  • and in sub-Saharan Africa or other places where TB is common,

    とサハラ以南のアフリカなどでは結核が一般的です。

  • now you're talking about going someplace pretty far,

    今、あなたはどこか遠くに行くという話をしています。

  • taking tough and slow public transport,

    タフでゆっくりとした公共交通機関を利用する

  • maybe the clinic is inefficient.

    クリニックの効率が悪いのかもしれません。

  • So now you're talking about taking a half day off of work every week

    毎週半日仕事を休むということですね。

  • from a job you desperately can't afford to lose.

    失うことができない仕事から

  • It's even worse when you consider the fact that there's a terrible stigma,

    それは、あなたがそこにひどい汚名があるという事実を考慮すると、さらに悪いことです。

  • and you desperately don't want people to find that you have the disease.

    そして、あなたは必死になって、病気を持っていることを人々に見つけて欲しくないのですね。

  • Some of the toughest stories we hear are actually from women

    私たちが耳にする厳しい話の中には、実は女性からのものもあります。

  • who, in these places where domestic violence can be kind of common,

    家庭内暴力が一般的な場所では

  • they tell us that they have to hide it from their husbands

    旦那には隠しておかないといけないと言われる

  • that they're coming to the clinic.

    クリニックに来ていることを

  • So it's no surprise that people don't complete treatment.

    だから、治療を完了しない人がいても不思議ではありません。

  • Can our approach really help them?

    私たちのアプローチは本当に彼らを助けることができるのでしょうか?

  • Can we really get them to stick it out?

    本当に張り出させることができるのか?

  • Yeah.

    そうだな

  • Every day, we text patients to remind them to take their medication,

    毎日、患者さんに薬を飲むことを忘れないようにメールをしています。

  • but if we stopped there,

    でも、そこで止まっていたら

  • there'd be lots of excuses.

    言い訳はたくさんあるだろう。

  • "Well, I didn't see the text."

    "文章は見ていない"

  • Or, "You know, I saw the text, but then I totally forgot,

    とか、「文章見たけど、すっかり忘れてた」とか。

  • put the phone down and I just forgot about it."

    "電話を置いたら忘れていた"

  • Or, "I lent the phone out to my mom."

    "ママに電話を貸した "とか

  • We have to eliminate these excuses

    これらの言い訳を排除しなければなりません。

  • and we do that by asking patients

    患者さんに尋ねることで

  • to log in and verify that they've taken their medication.

    にログインして、薬を飲んだかどうかを確認します。

  • If they don't log in, we text them again.

    彼らがログインしていない場合は、再度メールを送信します。

  • If they don't log in, we text them yet again.

    彼らがログインしていない場合は、もう一度メールで連絡します。

  • If, after three times, they still haven't verified,

    3回やっても確認されなかったら

  • we notify a team of supporters

    支援者チームに通知します。

  • and that team will call and text them

    そのチームが電話とメールをする

  • to try to get them back on the wagon.

    ワゴンに戻そうとしている。

  • No excuses.

    言い訳はしない。

  • Our approach, which, admittedly, uses all sorts of behavioral techniques,

    私たちのアプローチは、確かに、あらゆる種類の行動テクニックを使用しています。

  • including, as you've probably noticed, observability,

    観察可能性も含めて。

  • it was very effective.

    とても効果がありました。

  • Patients without access to our platform

    当社のプラットフォームにアクセスできない患者様

  • were three times more likely not to complete treatment.

    は治療を完了しない可能性が3倍高くなった。

  • Alright,

    いいだろう

  • you've increased observability,

    あなたは観測性を高めています。

  • you've eliminated excuses,

    あなたは言い訳を排除しました。

  • but there's still a third thing you need to be aware of.

    しかし、3つ目の注意点があります。

  • If you've been to Washington, DC or Japan or London,

    もしあなたがワシントンDCや日本やロンドンに行ったことがあるならば。

  • you know that metro riders there

    乗っている人は知っていますよね?

  • will be very careful to stand on the right-hand side of the escalator

    エスカレーターの右手に立つには気をつけよう

  • so that people can go by on the left.

    左側に人が通れるように

  • But unfortunately, not everywhere is that the norm,

    しかし、残念ながら、どこでもそれが当たり前というわけではありません。

  • and there's plenty of places where you can just stand on both sides

    両側に立つことができる場所はたくさんある

  • and block the escalator.

    とエスカレーターをブロックします。

  • Obviously, it's better for others

    明らかにそれは他の人のために良いです。

  • when we stand on the right and let them go by,

    右側に立って通り過ぎていくと

  • but we're only expected to do that some places.

    でも、それを期待されているのは一部の場所だけです。

  • This is a general phenomenon.

    これは一般的な現象です。

  • Sometimes we're expected to do good

    時には良いことをすることを期待されることもある

  • and sometimes not,

    と、そうでない時もあります。

  • and it means that people are really sensitive to cues

    人は合図に敏感であることを意味します。

  • that they're expected to do good in a particular situation,

    彼らは特定の状況で良いことをすることを期待されています。

  • which brings us to the third and final item on our checklist:

    これでチェックリストの3つ目、最後の項目にたどり着きました。

  • to communicate expectations,

    期待を伝えるために

  • to tell people,

    人に伝えるために

  • "Do the good deed right now."

    "今すぐ善い行いをする"

  • Here's a simple way to communicate expectations;

    ここでは、期待を伝える簡単な方法を紹介します。

  • simply tell them, "Hey, everybody else is doing the good deed."

    "みんなが善行をしている "と言えばいいんだ

  • The company Opower sends people in their electricity bill

    Opower社は、電気代の請求書を人々に送っている。

  • a small insert that compares their energy consumption

    エネルギー消費量を比較するための小さな挿入物

  • with that of people with similarly sized homes.

    同じような大きさの家を持っている人のそれと。

  • And when people find out that their neighbors are using less electricity,

    そして、近所の人が電気をあまり使っていないことに気づくと

  • they start to consume less.

    彼らはより少ない消費を開始します。

  • That same approach, it's been used to get people to vote or give to charity

    その同じアプローチは、それは人々が投票したり、慈善団体に与えるために取得するために使用されています。

  • or even reuse their towels in hotels.

    あるいはホテルでタオルを再利用することもあります。

  • What about this one?

    これはどうなんだろう?

  • Here's another way to communicate expectations;

    ここでは、期待を伝えるもう一つの方法を紹介します。

  • simply do it by saying, "Do the good deed" just at the right time.

    ちょうどいいタイミングで「いいことをしなさい」と言ってやるだけ。

  • What about this one?

    これはどうなんだろう?

  • This ticker reframes

    このティッカーはリフレーム

  • the kind of mundane task of turning off the lights

    灯消の儀

  • and turns it instead into an environmental contribution.

    と、それを環境への貢献に変えています。

  • The bottom line is, lots of different ways to do this,

    要は、いろいろな方法があるんだよ。

  • lots of ways to communicate expectations.

    期待を伝える方法がたくさん

  • Just don't forget to do it.

    ただ、忘れないでくださいね。

  • And that's it.

    そして、それだけです。

  • That's our checklist.

    それが私たちのチェックリストです。

  • Many of you are working on problems with important social consequences,

    多くの皆さんは、社会的に重要な結果をもたらす問題に取り組んでいます。

  • and sometimes you might need to motivate people to