Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • This talk contains mature language Viewer discretion is advised

    翻訳: Yuri Ozaki 校正: Eriko Tsukamoto

  • Let's get this out of the way.

    このトークは大人向けの表現を含みます 思慮判断の上ご覧ください

  • I'm here because I wrote a book about civility,

    では始めます

  • and because that book came out

    私はシビリティ(礼節・民度)を 保つことについての本を書きました

  • right around the 2016 American presidential election,

    そしてこの本が出版されたのが

  • I started getting lots of invitations to come and talk about civility

    ちょうど2016年の アメリカ大統領選挙のころだったので

  • and why we need more of it in American politics.

    私たちがなぜシビリティを保つことが 特に必要であるかについて

  • So great.

    講演して欲しいという 依頼が沢山舞い込みました

  • The only problem was that I had written that book about civility

    それは良かったのですが

  • because I was convinced that civility is ...

    しかし問題がありました

  • bullshit.

    私がシビリティについて書いた理由は それはインチキだと

  • (Laughter)

    確信していたからです

  • Now, that may sound like a highly uncivil thing to say,

    (笑)

  • and lucky for you, and for my publisher,

    かなり礼儀に欠ける言いように 聞こえるかもしれませんが

  • I did eventually come to change my mind.

    皆さんと出版社にとって幸いなことに

  • In the course of writing that book

    結局は先の意見を変えました

  • and studying the long history of civility and religious tolerance

    この本を書くため

  • in the 17th century,

    17世紀におけるシビリティと 宗教的寛容の歴史を

  • I came to discover that there is a virtue of civility,

    リサーチしていくにつれて

  • and far from being bullshit, it's actually absolutely essential,

    シビリティにメリットが あることに気づいたからです

  • especially for tolerant societies,

    それはインチキどころか 多様性に寛容な社会には絶対欠かせません

  • so societies like this one, that promise not only to protect diversity

    現在のように 多様な意見が存在する社会―

  • but also the heated and sometimes even hateful disagreements

    言論の自由を保障するだけでなく 多様性から生じる 意見の不一致や

  • that that diversity inspires.

    時に起こる敵意ある意見の対立さえ

  • You see, the thing about disagreement

    保障する社会にとっては

  • is that there is a reason

    "Disagreement (意見の不一致)" の形容詞は

  • that "disagreeable" is a synonym for "unpleasant."

    "Disagreeable (不愉快)"だということには

  • As the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes pointed out

    理由があります

  • all the way back in 1642,

    イギリスの哲学者トマス・ホッブズが

  • that's because the mere act of disagreement is offensive.

    1642年に言ったように

  • And Hobbes is still right. It works like this:

    単に異なる意見を持つということが それだけで人の感情を害するからです

  • so, if you and I disagree,

    ホッブズの指摘は現在も有効です 例えば—

  • and I'm right, because I always am,

    誰かと意見が食い違う時

  • how am I to make sense of the fact that you are so very, very wrong?

    「私はいつも正しいのだから 私が正しい」と主張したとします

  • It couldn't possibly be that you've just come to a different conclusion

    こんな言い分で相手が間違っていると 証明できるでしょうか

  • in good faith?

    相手は ただ真摯に考えた末に 別の結論に達したのではないでしょうか?

  • No, you must be up to something, you must be stupid,

    いや 相手は何か企んでいるに違いない あるいはバカ

  • bigoted, interested.

    偏屈で 下心があって

  • Maybe you're insane.

    頭がおかしいのかも

  • And the same goes the other way. Right?

    でも相手もそう思っています そうでしょう?

  • So the mere fact of your disagreeing with me

    だから単なる意見の不一致という事実は

  • is implicitly an insult not only to my views, but to my intelligence, too.

    暗に自分の見解や知性への侮辱となります

  • And things only get worse when the disagreements at stake

    そして意見の不一致が 世界観や自己認識など

  • are the ones that we somehow consider to be fundamental,

    根本的な問題についてであるとき

  • whether to our worldviews or to our identities.

    事態はもっと悪化します

  • You know the kinds of disagreement I mean.

    どういう対立のことか わかりますよね

  • One doesn't discuss religion or politics

    皆さんは食卓で宗教や政治さらに

  • or increasingly, the politics of popular culture, at the dinner table,

    大衆文化の動向についての議論はしません

  • because these are the disagreements,

    意見が一致しないからです

  • these are the things that people really, seriously disagree about,

    これらは誰もが真剣に揉める問題です

  • and they define themselves against their opponents in the controversy.

    人は意見の異なる相手を否定することで 自分を確認します

  • But of course those fundamental disagreements

    しかしこれらの根本的な意見の不一致はまさに

  • are precisely the ones that tolerant societies

    アメリカ合衆国のような 多様性に寛容な社会が受け入れようと

  • like the United States propose to tolerate,

    提唱しているものです

  • which perhaps explains why, historically, at least,

    これが 少なくとも歴史的にみて

  • tolerant societies haven't been the happy-clappy communities of difference

    寛容な社会が それほど能天気な社会ではないことを

  • that you sometimes hear about.

    説明しているかもしれません

  • No, they tend to be places where people have to hold their noses

    そうした社会の人々は 互いに軽蔑し合いながらも

  • and rub along together despite their mutual contempt.

    我慢しながら どうにかやっているといったところです

  • That's what I learned from studying religious tolerance

    それが近代英米の 宗教的寛容性を研究して

  • in early modern England and America.

    私が学んだことです

  • And I also learned that the virtue that makes

    また人々が殺し合わずに 共存することを可能にするのは

  • that un-murderous coexistence, if you will, possible,

    シビリティ(礼節・民度)という 美徳であると

  • is the virtue of civility,

    学びました

  • because civility makes our disagreements tolerable

    シビリティは 意見の不一致を耐えうるものにするので

  • so that we can share a life together even if we don't share a faith --

    もし信仰や政治問題などの信条で 互いに意見が折り合わなくても

  • religious, political or otherwise.

    私たちの共存を可能にします

  • Still, I couldn't help but notice

    それにしても かなり多くの人々がシビリティについて

  • that when most people talk about civility today --

    説くのを耳にします

  • and boy, do they talk about civility a lot --

    本当にあっちでもこっちでも聞きますが

  • they seem to have something else in mind.

    何か別のものと勘違いしているようです

  • So if civility is the virtue that makes it possible to tolerate disagreement

    もしシビリティが 意見の対立する人たちと 対話できるように

  • so that we can actually engage with our opponents,

    意見の不一致を許容させる美徳なら

  • talking about civility

    「シビリティを説く」というのは

  • seems to be mainly a strategy of disengagement.

    主に議論を放棄する戦略のように思えますね

  • It's a little bit like threatening to take your ball and go home

    例えると 試合に負けかかっているときに

  • when the game isn't going your way.

    ボールを持って「もう帰る」と 脅すようなものです

  • Because the funny thing about incivility

    おかしなことに

  • is that it's always the sin of our opponents.

    「シビリティに欠ける」と言う時 悪いのは常に相手側なのです

  • It's funny.

    変な話でしょう

  • When it comes to our own bad behavior,

    自分のマズい行動については

  • well, we seem to develop sudden-onset amnesia,

    突然 自分の言ったことを忘れてしまうか

  • or we can always justify it as an appropriate response

    憤慨した相手の発言への正当な応答だと

  • to the latest outrage from our opponents.

    言い訳をすればいい

  • So, "How can I be civil to someone who is set out to destroy

    「私の意見を全て 否定しようとする人間に対して

  • everything I stand for?

    礼儀正しくなんてできるか?

  • And by the way, they started it."

    そもそも始めたのはあっちだ」って

  • It's all terrifically convenient.

    これは ひどく都合のいい話です

  • Also convenient is the fact that most of today's big civility talkers

    都合がいいといえば 殆どのシビリティ論を説く人々に

  • tend to be quite vague and fuzzy

    シビリティとは一体何なのか尋ねても

  • when it comes to what they think civility actually entails.

    ぼんやりして曖昧です

  • We're told that civility is simply a synonym for respect,

    シビリティとは 単純に 「尊重」、「良いマナー」

  • for good manners, for politeness,

    「礼儀正しさ」と同義だと 言われますが

  • but at the same time, it's clear that to accuse someone of incivility

    その一方で「シビリティに欠ける」と 人を非難することは

  • is much, much worse than calling them impolite,

    「無作法だ」と言うより はるかにひどいことです

  • because to be uncivil is to be potentially intolerable

    なぜならシビリティが無い人とは 単に無礼という場合とは違う次元で

  • in a way that merely being rude isn't.

    耐え難い人だということだからです

  • So to call someone uncivil, to accuse them of incivility,

    だから誰かをシビリティが無いと責めるのは

  • is a way of communicating that they are somehow beyond the pale,

    その人に向かって 「あなたは私の許容範囲を超えていて

  • that they're not worth engaging with at all.

    議論する価値もない」と 言っていることになります

  • So here's the thing:

    ここでです

  • civility isn't bullshit,

    シビリティはインチキではありません

  • it's precious because it's the virtue that makes fundamental disagreement

    それは価値あるものです その美点は根本的な意見の不一致を

  • not only possible but even sometimes occasionally productive.

    可能にするだけでなく 実りのあるものにさえするからです

  • It's precious, but it's also really, really difficult.

    価値はありますが これはとても難しいことでもあります

  • Civility talk, on the other hand,

    一方で「シビリティを説く」ことは

  • well, that's really easy,

    とても簡単です

  • really easy,

    そうです簡単

  • and it also is almost always complete bullshit,

    そしてほとんどの場合全くのナンセンスです

  • which makes things slightly awkward for me

    私が今シビリティについて お話ししているので

  • as I continue to talk to you about civility.

    少し妙に聞こえますが

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Anyway, we tend to forget it,

    私たちは忘れがちですが

  • but politicians and intellectuals have been warning us for decades now

    政治家や知識人が何十年も警告しているように

  • that the United States is facing a crisis of civility,

    アメリカ合衆国は シビリティを失いかけてます

  • and they've tended to blame that crisis on technological developments,

    この危機はテクノロジーの発達もしくは

  • on things like cable TV, talk radio, social media.

    テレビ、ラジオのトークショーや ソーシャルメディアの影響だと言われます

  • But any historian will tell you

    しかし歴史家の意見はこうです

  • that there never was a golden age of disagreement,

    歴史上 意見の相違の黄金時代 などというものは存在しません

  • let alone good feelings,

    気持ち良く異論を唱え合うなど

  • not in American politics.

    アメリカ政治には皆無です

  • In my book, though, I argue that the first modern crisis of civility

    私の本で 近代における 最初のシビリティの危機が始まったのは

  • actually began about 500 years ago,

    約500年前だと指摘しました

  • when a certain professor of theology named Martin Luther

    マルティン・ルターという神学者が

  • took advantage of a recent advancement in communications technology,

    当時の最先端のコミュニケーション技術

  • the printing press,

    印刷機を使って

  • to call the Pope the Antichrist,

    当時の教皇を反キリストだと訴えたのです

  • and thus inadvertently launch the Protestant Reformation.

    そうして図らずも宗教改革が起こりました

  • So think of the press, if you will, as the Twitter of the 16th century,

    当時の印刷機を 16世紀のツイッターだと考えてください

  • and Martin Luther as the original troll.

    そしてマルティン・ルターは 元祖「荒らし」でした

  • And I'm not exaggerating here.

    誇張しているわけではありません

  • He once declared himself unable to pray

    彼は「反キリスト教」である

  • without at the same time cursing

    カトリック教徒に悪態をつかずには

  • his "anti-Christian," i.e. Catholic, opponents.

    神に祈りを捧げられないと言いました

  • And of course, those Catholic opponents clutched their pearls

    そしてもちろんカトリック信者は ビックリ仰天して

  • and called for civility then, too,

    シビリティを持てと訴えたのです

  • but all the while, they gave as good as they got

    しかしそう言っておきながら彼らも

  • with traditional slurs like "heretic,"

    「異教徒」という昔ながらの悪口や

  • and, worst of all, "Protestant,"

    16世紀には「プロテスタント」 (異議を唱える者)という

  • which began in the 16th century as an insult.

    蔑称を使い始めました

  • The thing about civility talk, then as now,

    シビリティ争論の昔と今で興味深いのは

  • was that you could call out your opponent for going low,

    相手を卑しいと責め立てて

  • and then take advantage of the moral high ground

    自分は道徳的に高い位置にいると 主張することで

  • to go as low or lower,

    相手と同じか それ以下に 堕ちてしまうことです

  • because calling for civility sets up the speaker

    なぜならシビリティを唱える本人は

  • as a model of decorum while implicitly, subtly stigmatizing

    自分は礼節の模範だとする一方 暗に異議を持つ「厚かましい」者を

  • anyone with the temerity to disagree as uncivil.

    不道徳だと非難しているからです

  • And so civility talk in the 17th century becomes a really effective way

    だから17世紀のシビリティ論は 国教会のメンバーにとっては

  • for members of the religious establishment

    現状に反発して声を上げた反対派の

  • to silence, suppress, exclude dissenters outside of the established church,

    口を封じ 彼らを弾圧し排除する方法として

  • especially when they spoke out against the status quo.

    効果的でした

  • So Anglican ministers could lecture atheists

    例えば英国国教会の聖職者は無神論者に

  • on the offensiveness of their discourse.

    彼らの論議は汚らわしいと 諭すかもしれません

  • Everyone could complain about the Quakers

    また例えばクエーカー教徒のことを

  • for refusing to doff and don their hats

    帽子を脱ぐべき時に脱がないとか

  • or their "uncouth" practice of shaking hands.

    握手が粗野だと非難するかもしれません

  • But those accusations of incivility

    しかしこのような礼儀を欠いた言いがかりは

  • pretty soon became pretexts for persecution.

    すぐに迫害行為に繋がります

  • So far, so familiar, right?

    よく聞くパターンですよね

  • We see that strategy again and again.

    こういうやり方はしばしば目にします

  • It's used to silence civil rights protesters in the 20th century.

    これは20世紀には 公民権運動を抑え込むのに使われました

  • And I think it explains why partisans on both sides of the aisle

    私が思うに対立する両者が 特定の相手や意見が

  • keep reaching for this, frankly, antiquated,

    自分の理解の範囲外にあると 伝えたいと同時に

  • early modern language of civility

    厄介な議論から遠ざかりたい時に

  • precisely when they want to communicate that certain people and certain views

    いつも このはっきり言って時代遅れの

  • are beyond the pale,

    近世の言葉(シビリティ)を 振りかざしてしまう

  • but they want to save themselves the trouble

    パターンに陥る理由は

  • of actually making an argument.

    ここにあると思います

  • So no wonder skeptics like me tend to roll our eyes

    だから私のような懐疑論者は 軽率な「美徳」のトピックが始まると

  • when the calls for conversational virtue begin,

    「また始まった」と思うのです

  • because instead of healing our social and political divisions,

    なぜならシビリティを説く時それは 社会的政治的な溝を

  • it seems like so much civility talk is actually making the problem worse.

    埋める代わりに 事態を悪化させている気がするからです

  • It's saving us the trouble of actually speaking to each other,

    シビリティを説くということは 議論を交わす面倒を避け

  • allowing us to speak past each other or at each other

    お互い自分の意見が優れているという シグナルを出しつつ

  • while signaling our superior virtue

    すれ違いもしくは 相手の発言を無視して意見を語り

  • and letting the audience know which side we're on.

    人々に対して 自分の立場を示すことなのです

  • And given this, I think one might be forgiven, as I did,

    だから多くのシビリティ論が ナンセンスなのだから

  • for assuming that because so much civility talk is bullshit,

    シビリティの美徳自体もまた ナンセンスなはずだと思ったとしても

  • well then, the virtue of civility must be bullshit, too.

    許されるだろうと思うのです

  • But here, again, I think a little historical perspective goes a long way.

    しかしまた歴史的観点が役立ちます

  • Because remember, the same early modern crisis of civility

    なぜなら宗教改革を生み出した

  • that launched the Reformation

    近代のシビリティの危機こそが

  • also gave birth to tolerant societies,

    寛容な社会も誕生させたのですから

  • places like Rhode Island, Pennsylvania,

    例えばロードアイランドやペンシルベニア

  • and indeed, eventually the United States,

    そして最終的にはアメリカ合衆国のような

  • places that at least aspired to protect disagreement

    少なくとも意見の違いや多様性を保証しようと

  • as well as diversity,

    目指している場所です

  • and what made that possible was the virtue of civility.

    シビリティの美徳がこれを実現したのです

  • What made disagreement tolerable,

    これは 例え私たちの信仰が違っても

  • what it made it possible for us to share a life,

    意見の不一致を許容させ

  • even when we didn't share a faith,

    共存を可能にしました

  • was a virtue,

    しかしその美徳は 今日シビリティについて説く人々が

  • but one, I think, that is perhaps less aspirational

    抱きがちなものよりも消極的で

  • and a lot more confrontational

    もっと対立的なものなのだと

  • than the one that people who talk about civility a lot today

    思います

  • tend to have in mind.

    だから私はそのような美徳を 「最低限シビリティ」と呼びます

  • So I like to call that virtue "mere civility."

    例えば元配偶者

  • You may know it as the virtue that allows us to get through

    あるいは厄介な隣人

  • our relations with an ex-spouse,

    または違う党派の人などと

  • or a bad neighbor,

    やっていくのに美徳が助けになります

  • not to mention a member of the other party.

    最低限シビリティは 不承不承でも 最低限のマナーを守ることです

  • Because to be merely civil is to meet a low bar grudgingly,

    しかしまたこれにも道理があります

  • and that, again, makes sense,

    シビリティは私たちが反対意見を持つことを 助ける美徳だからです

  • because civility is a virtue that's meant to help us disagree,

    ホッブズが何百年も前に言ったように

  • and as Hobbes told us all those centuries ago,

    意見の不一致が不愉快なのには 理由があります

  • disagreeable means unpleasant for a reason.

    もしインチキでないならシビリティもしくは 「最低限シビリティ」とは何でしょうか

  • But if it isn't bullshit, what exactly is civility or mere civility?

    どんな要素があるのでしょう?

  • What does it require?

    まず シビリティとは

  • Well, to start, it is not and cannot be

    相手の尊重や礼儀正しさとは 同義ではありません

  • the same thing as being respectful or polite,

    なぜならシビリティは まさに 尊敬するのが難しいか不可能な人と

  • because we need civility precisely when we're dealing with those people

    うまくやっていこうとする時 必要になるからです

  • that we find it the most difficult, or maybe even impossible, to respect.

    また シビリティは「良い人であること」と 同義ではありません

  • Similarly, being civil can't be the same as being nice,

    「良い人」とは 相手のことを 本当はどう思っているかとか

  • because being nice means not telling people what you really think about them

    意見が間違っているとか 面と向かって言わないからです

  • or their wrong, wrong views.

    でも シビリティは 自分の本心を伝えることです

  • No, being civil means speaking your mind,

    それも反対意見を持つ当人に対してです

  • but to your opponent's face,

    裏でコソコソというのではありません

  • not behind her back.

    「最低限シビリティ」とは 「言葉を和らげて伝える」ことではありません

  • Being merely civil means not pulling our punches,

    しかし同時にもしかすると小出しに 反対意見を述べることと言えるかもしれません

  • but at the same time, it means maybe not landing all those punches all at once,

    なぜなら「最低限シビリティ」は

  • because the point of mere civility

    私たちが 根本的に相違する意見を 持っていても

  • is to allow us to disagree, to disagree fundamentally,

    自分にとって邪魔な人たちと 共存する可能性を否定したり潰したりせず

  • but to do so without denying or destroying the possibility of a common life tomorrow

    異なる意見を持ち続けることだからです

  • with the people that we think are standing in our way today.

    この意味ではシビリティはまた 「勇気」というもう一つの美徳に

  • And in that sense, I think civility is actually closely related

    近いと思います

  • to another virtue, the virtue of courage.

    「最低限シビリティ」は 賛同しない勇気を持ち

  • So mere civility is having the courage to make yourself disagreeable,

    その立場に居続けられること

  • and to stay that way,

    その一方で 意見が対立する人と 同じ場所に留まり

  • but to do so while staying in the room

    向き合い続けながら それができるということです

  • and staying present to your opponents.

    この点では「シビリティ論」に対して 「ナンセンス!」と言うのは

  • And it also means that, sometimes, calling bullshit on people's civility talk

    唯一のシビリティのある行為かもしれません

  • is really the only civil thing to do.

    少なくとも私はそう思います

  • At least that's what I think.

    私が17世紀の宗教的寛容性の

  • But look, if I've learned anything from studying the long history

    長い歴史から学んだことがあるとすれば こういうことです

  • of religious tolerance in the 17th century, it's this:

    もしあなたがシビリティに言及するのを 論争を避ける手段として使っていたり

  • if you're talking about civility as a way to avoid an argument,

    自分と似た意見で 賛成してくれる人々とだけ

  • to isolate yourself in the more agreeable company

    寄り固まるための手段として使ったり

  • of the like-minded who already agree with you,

    自分と全く根本的に異なる意見を持つ人と

  • if you find yourself never actually speaking to anyone

    全く会話をしていないことに 気づいたとしたら