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  • K: What we are trying, in all these

  • discussions and talks here, is to see

  • if we cannot radically bring about

  • a transformation of the mind -

  • not accept things as they are,

  • nor revolt against them.

  • Revolt doesn't answer a thing.

  • But to understand it, to go into it, to examine it,

  • give your heart and your mind, with everything

  • that you have, to find out a way of living differently.

  • Q: The speaker is Krishnamurti, one of the more original

  • and challenging men of our time.

  • During the past four decades,

  • his writings and talks in Europe, Asia and America have followed

  • a singular path, free from factionalism and dogma.

  • This talk, Freedom from Fear,

  • is the 3rd in a series of 8 programs

  • in which Krishnamurti speaks directly to those subjects

  • which most profoundly affect the human condition:

  • love and death, fear,

  • and our discontent. He speaks of the real revolution,

  • a radical change in ourselves.

  • K: Considering what the world is now, with all the misery, conflict,

  • destructive brutality, aggression,

  • tremendous advancement in technology, and so on,

  • it seems to me, though man has cultivated the external world,

  • and has more or less mastered it,

  • inwardly he is still as he was:

  • a great deal of animal in him,

  • he is still brutal, violent, aggressive,

  • acquisitive, competitive,

  • and he has built a society along these lines.

  • And the more one observes

  • - and I think almost everyone,

  • unless totally blind, deaf and dumb,

  • is aware of the extraordinary

  • contradictions of human beings.

  • And to understand this extraordinary

  • complex problem of existence

  • one must have tremendous passion,

  • which cannot possibly be supplied by the intellect

  • or by casual sentiment or emotionalism,

  • or the passion aroused by

  • committing oneself to a particular course of action,

  • or belonging to a particular political or religious group.

  • That does give a certain quality of intensity,

  • a certain elan,

  • a certain drive, but through it all there is the demand

  • for gratification, for pleasure.

  • And the whole structure of society,

  • with its morality, with its gods,

  • with its culture, with its entertainment,

  • is based on pleasure.

  • So I hope that you will so listen to what is being said:

  • not hear a lot of words,

  • to a lot of ideas, because ideas

  • and words are not the fact.

  • Ideas and words never bring about

  • a radical revolution, a mutation in the mind.

  • So I am not dealing with ideas and opinions and judgment.

  • What we are concerned with is bringing about

  • a radical revolution in the mind.

  • And that revolution must take place

  • without effort, because all effort has behind it a motive.

  • And a revolution with a motive is not a revolution at all.

  • A change

  • becomes merely a modified continuity when there is a motive.

  • But

  • a mutation, a radical transformation of the mind

  • can only take place

  • when there is no motive, and when we begin

  • to understand the psychological structure,

  • not only of society, which is part of us.

  • And to understand it there must be the act of listening -

  • not listening to the speaker but listening

  • to what is actually taking place in ourselves.

  • So it is

  • a responsibility how you all listen, because we are taking

  • a journey together into the whole psychological structure of man.

  • Because in the understanding of that structure

  • and the meaning of it

  • we can then perhaps bring about a change in society.

  • And society, God knows, needs a total change, a total revolution.

  • So, as we were saying earlier,

  • our whole concept, action and urges

  • are based on pleasure.

  • And until one understands

  • the nature and the structure of pleasure

  • there will always be fear,

  • fear not only in our relationships with each other

  • but fear of all life, the totality of existence.

  • So without understanding pleasure

  • there can be no freedom from fear.

  • And we are not denying pleasure, we are not advocating

  • puritanical way of life, a suppression of pleasure

  • or a substitution of pleasure,

  • or the denial of that thing that we call

  • great satisfaction - we are examining it.

  • And in examination there must be

  • freedom from opinion, otherwise you can't examine.

  • Pleasure is an extraordinary thing to understand,

  • needs a great deal of attention,

  • a swiftness of mind, a subtle perception.

  • So one has to understand it,

  • and to understand it there must be

  • neither withholding nor denying that quality,

  • that principle of pleasure.

  • And that's very difficult to do because we are so

  • heavily conditioned

  • to accept and to function

  • with the motive of pleasure, with gratification.

  • And therefore we are always limiting our total attention.

  • We look at life in fragments, and as long as the particular

  • fragmentation exists, one cannot possibly see the total.

  • If one says:

  • I must have a certain pleasure and I'm going

  • to hold on to it at any price,

  • then we will not comprehend or see

  • the total pattern of pleasure.

  • And we are concerned with seeing

  • the totality of pleasure, what is involved in it:

  • the pain, the frustration, the agony,

  • the remorse,

  • the ache of loneliness

  • when all pleasure is denied,

  • and naturally escape from all that

  • through various forms,

  • which again is the continuation of pleasure.

  • And the mind that is caught,

  • that is conditioned by this principle of pleasure

  • cannot, obviously, see what is true,

  • cannot think clearly,

  • and therefore it has no passion.

  • It translates passion as sexual, or

  • achieving some fragmentary activity

  • and fulfilment in that fragment.

  • So where there is no understanding of pleasure

  • there is only enthusiasm, sentimentality which evokes

  • brutality and callousness, and all the rest of it.

  • So what is pleasure?

  • Because without understanding pleasure

  • there is no love.

  • Love is not pleasure,

  • love is not desire,

  • love is not memory.

  • And

  • pleasure denies love.

  • Therefore it seems to me it is important

  • to understand this principle.

  • Surely pleasure is desire,

  • desire

  • which comes into being very naturally

  • when you see something

  • which gives you a stimulation, a sensation.

  • And from that sensation there is desire,

  • and the continuation of that desire

  • is pleasure,

  • and that pleasure is sustained by thought.

  • I see something, and

  • in that contact with it there is a sensation.

  • The sensation is the desire, sustained by thought,

  • because thought is the response of memory.

  • That memory is based on other experiences of pleasure and pain,

  • and thought gives to that desire the sustenance,

  • the quality of pursuit, and fulfilment.

  • One can see this in oneself very simply.

  • If one observes, it's all there in front of you.

  • And the quality of observation cannot be taught by another.

  • And if you are taught how to observe,

  • you cease to observe -

  • then you have merely the technique of observation,

  • which prevents you from actually seeing yourself.

  • For yourself is the whole of mankind,

  • with all the aches and the miseries,

  • with the solitude and loneliness, despair,

  • the utter loneliness of existence, meaninglessness of it all.

  • And when you do so observe, it unfolds endlessly,

  • which is life itself.

  • Then you are not dependent on anybody,

  • on any psychologist,

  • on any theologian, or any priest, or any dogma.

  • Then you are looking

  • at this movement of life which is yourself.

  • But unfortunately we cannot look with clarity

  • because we are driven by this principle of pleasure.

  • So to understand pleasure,

  • one has to understand the structure of thinking,

  • because it's thought that gives continuity to pleasure.

  • I've had a pleasure,

  • an experience of pleasure yesterday,

  • of different kinds, and thought thinks about that pleasure

  • and demands its continuity.

  • So, memory of that pleasure of yesterday

  • is reacting, demanding that it be renewed through thought.

  • And

  • thought is time.

  • Thinking about the past pleasure, past gratification,

  • yesterday's delight and enjoyment.

  • And that thought demands its continuity now.

  • And thought projects the tomorrow's pleasure.

  • And thought creates the past, the present and the future,

  • which is time.

  • I have had that pleasure,

  • I am going to have it, and I shall have it.

  • This time quality is created by thought,

  • bred, put together by thought.

  • And thought is time, and it is time that creates fear.

  • And

  • without probing into this time, pleasure, thought,

  • we're always bound by time,

  • and therefore time has never a stop.

  • It's only when there is an end to time

  • there is something totally new.

  • Otherwise there's merely a continuity of what has been,

  • modified through the present and conditioned by the future.

  • For a human being to be free of fear,

  • fear about the future, fear about...

  • - there are a dozen fears that human beings have,

  • conscious or undiscovered fears:

  • fears of the neighbour,

  • fears of death, fear of being lonely, insecure, uncertain,

  • fear of being confused, fear of being stupid

  • and trying to become very clever, you know, fear -

  • fear is always in relation to something,

  • it doesn't exist by itself.

  • And to be totally free of fear - not partially, not a fragment

  • of that totality of what is considered fear

  • - to be totally,

  • that is psychologically to be completely free of fear,

  • one must understand thought, time and pleasure.

  • And this understanding is not intellectual or emotional.

  • Understanding can only come when there is total attention,

  • when you give your complete attention to pleasure,

  • how it comes into being, what is time.

  • Time which thought has created

  • - I was, I will be, I am.

  • I must change this into that.

  • This idea of gradual process, this idea of gradual

  • psychological evolution of man.

  • And that's very gratifying:

  • we'll gradually, all of us, become extraordinarily kindly,

  • we shall gradually lose all our violence, aggression,

  • we'll all be brotherly at one time, much later.

  • This gradual concept, which is generally called evolution,

  • psychologically,

  • seems to me so utterly false.

  • We're not offering an opinion; this is a fact.

  • Because when you give your attention

  • to something completely

  • there is no time at all.

  • You don't say, 'I will do it tomorrow.'

  • In that state of attention

  • there is neither yesterday, today or tomorrow,

  • therefore time has come to an end.

  • But that ending of time cannot possibly be

  • when there is the centre as the principle of pleasure.

  • Pleasure

  • has in it

  • pain.

  • The two things cannot be separated.

  • Pleasure is pain,

  • if you have observed.

  • So you cannot possibly, psychologically, avoid pain

  • if you are pursuing, psychologically, pleasure.

  • We want the one and we don't want the other.