Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I didn't always love unintended consequences,

    翻訳: Tami Ishii 校正: Natsuhiko Mizutani

  • but I've really learned to appreciate them.

    私は 常に意図せぬ結果を望んではいませんが

  • I've learned that they're really the essence

    その価値は認めようとしています

  • of what makes for progress,

    一見ひどい結果に見えたとしても

  • even when they seem to be terrible.

    進歩のための本質であることが

  • And I'd like to review

    判ってきたからです

  • just how unintended consequences

    それでは

  • play the part that they do.

    意図せぬ結果が

  • Let's go to 40,000 years before the present,

    果たす役割を見ていきましょう

  • to the time of the cultural explosion,

    4万年前の過去まで遡ってみましょう

  • when music, art, technology,

    文明が劇的に発展して

  • so many of the things that we're enjoying today,

    そして 音楽や美術 テクノロジー

  • so many of the things that are being demonstrated at TED

    現代では当たり前になったものー

  • were born.

    こうしてTEDに登場する多くのものが

  • And the anthropologist Randall White

    誕生する時期です

  • has made a very interesting observation:

    人類学者のランダル・ホワイト氏は

  • that if our ancestors

    おもしろい見解を述べています

  • 40,000 years ago

    もし 4万年前の

  • had been able to see

    我々の祖先に

  • what they had done,

    彼らが今に遺した物を

  • they wouldn't have really understood it.

    見せたとしても

  • They were responding

    全く理解できないでしょう

  • to immediate concerns.

    祖先たちは目先の問題を

  • They were making it possible for us

    片付けていただけなのです

  • to do what they do,

    彼らがしていたことは

  • and yet, they didn't really understand

    現代にまで伝わっているのですが

  • how they did it.

    でもどうしてここに至ったのか

  • Now let's advance to 10,000 years before the present.

    理解できないでしょう

  • And this is when it really gets interesting.

    さて 1万年前に時間を進めましょう

  • What about the domestication of grains?

    ここからもっと面白くなります

  • What about the origins of agriculture?

    穀物の栽培を取り上げます

  • What would our ancestors 10,000 years ago

    農業の起源はどうだったのか

  • have said

    当時の我々の祖先が

  • if they really had technology assessment?

    技術アセスメントをしたら

  • And I could just imagine the committees

    どんな結果を出したでしょうか

  • reporting back to them

    委員会から提出される

  • on where agriculture was going to take humanity,

    報告書には 今後

  • at least in the next few hundred years.

    数百年間の人類の未来に農業が

  • It was really bad news.

    及ぼす影響がまとめられています

  • First of all, worse nutrition,

    評価は低かったでしょう

  • maybe shorter life spans.

    まず栄養状態が悪化して

  • It was simply awful for women.

    寿命が短くなります

  • The skeletal remains from that period

    女性は厳しい目に遭います

  • have shown that they were grinding grain morning, noon and night.

    遺された骨を調べたところ

  • And politically, it was awful.

    朝昼晩と穀物を挽いていたことが判りました

  • It was the beginning of a much higher degree

    政治的にも厄介でした

  • of inequality among people.

    人々の間の格差が

  • If there had been rational technology assessment then,

    大幅に開き始めました

  • I think they very well might have said,

    もし合理的な技術アセスメントをしたら

  • "Let's call the whole thing off."

    諦めるべきだという結論に

  • Even now, our choices are having unintended effects.

    なっても不思議ではありません

  • Historically, for example,

    今でも 我々の選択には意図せぬ効果が伴います

  • chopsticks -- according to one Japanese anthropologist

    歴史的な例として

  • who wrote a dissertation about it

    箸について 日本人の人類学研究者が

  • at the University of Michigan --

    ミシガン大学の

  • resulted in long-term changes

    博士論文にまとめました

  • in the dentition, in the teeth,

    箸は長期的には

  • of the Japanese public.

    日本人の歯並びに

  • And we are also changing our teeth right now.

    影響を及ぼしました

  • There is evidence

    人類の歯は今も変化を続けています

  • that the human mouth and teeth

    その証拠に

  • are growing smaller all the time.

    我々の口と歯は

  • That's not necessarily a bad unintended consequence.

    小さくなり続けています

  • But I think from the point of view of a Neanderthal,

    意図せぬ悪い結果というわけではありませんが

  • there would have been a lot of disapproval

    ただ ネアンデルタール人から見ると

  • of the wimpish choppers that we now have.

    現代の噛み切る力の弱い歯は

  • So these things are kind of relative

    いただけないでしょう

  • to where you or your ancestors happen to stand.

    祖先と我々とで 立場の違いによって

  • In the ancient world

    見方が異なるのです

  • there was a lot of respect for unintended consequences,

    古代の人は

  • and there was a very healthy sense of caution,

    意図せぬ結果を重視していました

  • reflected in the Tree of Knowledge,

    とても健全な警戒感があったことは

  • in Pandora's Box,

    善悪の知識の木の話からも

  • and especially in the myth of Prometheus

    パンドラの箱の話からもわかります

  • that's been so important

    またとりわけ 現代技術の

  • in recent metaphors about technology.

    比喩として重要な

  • And that's all very true.

    プロメテウスの神話も同様です

  • The physicians of the ancient world --

    それが 真実なのです

  • especially the Egyptians,

    太古の医師というのは

  • who started medicine as we know it --

    特に 今の医療の原型を

  • were very conscious

    作り上げたエジプトでは

  • of what they could and couldn't treat.

    何が治療できて 何が治療できないのか

  • And the translations of the surviving texts say,

    よく把握していました

  • "This I will not treat. This I cannot treat."

    現存する資料の訳にこう書かれています

  • They were very conscious.

    「治療しない 治療できない」

  • So were the followers of Hippocrates.

    たいへん慎重でした

  • The Hippocratic manuscripts also --

    ヒポクラテスの弟子も同様でした

  • repeatedly, according to recent studies --

    ヒポクラテスの集典にもありますが

  • show how important it is not to do harm.

    危害を加えないことが強調されてます

  • More recently,

    最近の研究で明らかにされたことです

  • Harvey Cushing,

    それから もっと最近の話ですが

  • who really developed neurosurgery as we know it,

    ハーヴェイ・クッシング氏は

  • who changed it from a field of medicine

    脳神経外科医学の先駆者です

  • that had a majority of deaths resulting from surgery

    医療の中でも

  • to one in which there was a hopeful outlook,

    手術による死者が大半だった分野を

  • he was very conscious

    明るい見込みのある分野に改革しました

  • that he was not always going to do the right thing.

    彼は 為すことが常にー

  • But he did his best,

    正しいわけではないことに留意していました

  • and he kept meticulous records

    しかし 彼は全力を尽くして

  • that let him transform that branch of medicine.

    きめ細かい記録を残すことによって

  • Now if we look forward a bit

    この分野を大きく進展させることができたのです

  • to the 19th century,

    近代 今度は19世紀を

  • we find a new style of technology.

    見てみましょう

  • What we find is,

    新しいテクノロジーの形態が導入されます

  • no longer simple tools,

    この時代に登場するのは

  • but systems.

    単なる道具ではなく

  • We find more and more

    システムです

  • complex arrangements of machines

    ますます複雑な機械の

  • that make it harder and harder

    組み合わせが登場して

  • to diagnose what's going on.

    何が起こっているかの見極めは

  • And the first people who saw that

    ますます難しくなりました

  • were the telegraphers of the mid-19th century,

    そんなシステムに最初に触れたのは

  • who were the original hackers.

    19世紀半ばの電信技手です

  • Thomas Edison would have been very, very comfortable

    彼らこそ ハッカーの元祖です

  • in the atmosphere of a software firm today.

    トーマス・エジソンは

  • And these hackers had a word

    今日のソフトウェア会社に溶け込むでしょう

  • for those mysterious bugs in telegraph systems

    電報システムの奇妙なバグを

  • that they called bugs.

    ハッカーたちはこう呼びました

  • That was the origin of the word "bug."

    「バグ」

  • This consciousness, though,

    これがバグの語源です

  • was a little slow to seep through the general population,

    しかしこの認識が

  • even people who were very, very well informed.

    広まるまでには時間がかかりました

  • Samuel Clemens, Mark Twain,

    知識層の間でも同様でした

  • was a big investor

    サム・クレメンズすなわち

  • in the most complex machine of all times --

    マーク・トゥエインは

  • at least until 1918 --

    少なくとも1918年までに米国特許庁に

  • registered with the U.S. Patent Office.

    登録された最も複雑な機械に

  • That was the Paige typesetter.

    多額の投資をしていました

  • The Paige typesetter

    それがペイジの自動植字機でした

  • had 18,000 parts.

    ペイジ自動植字機は

  • The patent had 64 pages of text

    1万8千点の部品から成り

  • and 271 figures.

    特許書類には64ページの本文に加えて

  • It was such a beautiful machine

    271点の図面が記されていました

  • because it did everything that a human being did

    素晴らしい機械でした

  • in setting type --

    組版において人がしていたことを全て

  • including returning the type to its place,

    行える機械だったのです

  • which was a very difficult thing.

    活字を元の場所に戻すという

  • And Mark Twain, who knew all about typesetting,

    難問も解決していました

  • really was smitten by this machine.

    組版の全てを知り尽くしたトゥエインは

  • Unfortunately, he was smitten in more ways than one,

    この機械に魅せられたのです

  • because it made him bankrupt,

    不幸にも 深くはまり込み過ぎて本人は

  • and he had to tour the world speaking

    破産に追い込まれました

  • to recoup his money.

    彼が世界中で講演旅行を続けたのは

  • And this was an important thing

    そのとき投じたお金を取り戻すためでした

  • about 19th century technology,

    19世紀のテクノロジーで重要なことは

  • that all these relationships among parts

    どんなに専門家が

  • could make the most brilliant idea fall apart,

    絶賛したアイデアでも

  • even when judged by the most expert people.

    部品の間の様々な関係のせいで

  • Now there is something else, though, in the early 20th century

    見事に失敗する場合があったことです

  • that made things even more complicated.

    20世紀初頭には 事態をさらに

  • And that was that safety technology itself

    複雑化する別の要因が加わります

  • could be a source of danger.

    なんと安全技術そのものが

  • The lesson of the Titanic, for a lot of the contemporaries,

    危険を招きかねないのです

  • was that you must have enough lifeboats

    当時の人たちがタイタニックの事故で学んだことは

  • for everyone on the ship.

    乗客全員の分の救命ボートを

  • And this was the result

    装備すべしということでした

  • of the tragic loss of lives

    救命ボートに乗れずに

  • of people who could not get into them.

    失われた尊い命から

  • However, there was another case, the Eastland,

    学んだことです

  • a ship that capsized in Chicago Harbor in 1915,

    ところが 別の事故が起きました イーストランド号が

  • and it killed 841 people --

    1915年にシカゴ港で転覆しました

  • that was 14 more

    死者841人

  • than the passenger toll of the Titanic.

    タイタニックよりも

  • The reason for it, in part, was

    14人多い犠牲者を出しました

  • the extra life boats that were added

    この事故は部分的には

  • that made this already unstable ship

    追加した予備の救命ボートが理由で

  • even more unstable.

    もともと不安定だった船は

  • And that again proves

    さらに不安定になったのでした

  • that when you're talking about unintended consequences,

    この話もまた

  • it's not that easy to know

    意図せぬ結果から

  • the right lessons to draw.

    正しい教訓を引き出すのが

  • It's really a question of the system, how the ship was loaded,

    容易ではないことを示します

  • the ballast and many other things.

    これはシステムの問題や 荷物の詰み方

  • So the 20th century, then,

    バラストなど多くが関わります

  • saw how much more complex reality was,

    こうして20世紀には 現実がいかに複雑かを

  • but it also saw a positive side.

    思い知らされましたが

  • It saw that invention

    ポジティブな側面も見られました

  • could actually benefit from emergencies.

    新しい発明が

  • It could benefit

    緊急事態から生まれることや

  • from tragedies.

    不幸の中から

  • And my favorite example of that --

    生まれることが見いだされました

  • which is not really widely known

    これを示す良い例があります

  • as a technological miracle,

    技術の奇跡としては

  • but it may be one of the greatest of all times,

    あまり知られていませんが

  • was the scaling up of penicillin in the Second World War.

    歴史的に見ても著しい成果として

  • Penicillin was discovered in 1928,

    第2次世界大戦中にペニシリンが量産化されました

  • but even by 1940,

    ペニシリンは1928年に発見されました

  • no commercially and medically useful quantities of it

    しかし 1940年になっても

  • were being produced.

    商業的にも医学的にも実用的な量は

  • A number of pharmaceutical companies were working on it.

    生産できませんでした

  • They were working on it independently,

    いくつもの製薬会社が取り組んでいましたが

  • and they weren't getting anywhere.

    ばらばらの取り組みでは

  • And the Government Research Bureau

    意味のある結果は得られませんでした

  • brought representatives together

    そこで 政府調査局は

  • and told them that this is something

    製薬会社の代表者を集め

  • that has to be done.

    これを何とかしよう

  • And not only did they do it,

    と訴えました

  • but within two years,

    その結果

  • they scaled up penicillin

    2年も経たないうちに

  • from preparation in one-liter flasks

    ペニシリンの量産化に成功したのです

  • to 10,000-gallon vats.

    当初の1リットルのフラスコから

  • That was how quickly penicillin was produced

    1万ガロンタンクの量産になりました

  • and became one of the greatest medical advances of all time.

    これほど早くペニシリンが量産できるようになり

  • In the Second World War, too,

    医学は飛躍的進歩を遂げました

  • the existence

    同じく第2次世界大戦中に

  • of solar radiation

    太陽電波の存在が

  • was demonstrated by studies of interference

    明らかになりました

  • that was detected by the radar stations of Great Britain.

    イギリスのレーダー基地に生じた

  • So there were benefits in calamities --

    障害の研究から判ったことです

  • benefits to pure science,

    このように災厄には良い面もあって

  • as well as to applied science

    基礎科学さえも進歩します

  • and medicine.

    応用科学や

  • Now when we come to the period after the Second World War,

    医学は言うまでもありません

  • unintended consequences get even more interesting.

    時は 第2次世界大戦後

  • And my favorite example of that

    意図せぬ結果はさらにおもしろいことになります

  • occurred beginning in 1976,

    非常に良い例は

  • when it was discovered

    1976年に端を発するものです

  • that the bacteria causing Legionnaires disease

    この年にレジオネラ症を

  • had always been present in natural waters,

    引き起こす菌が発見されました

  • but it was the precise temperature of the water

    この菌は 水中に普通に存在していますが

  • in heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems

    暖房や換気 エアコンの中に溜まった

  • that raised the right temperature

    水の温度が

  • for the maximum reproduction

    レジオネラ菌の繁殖に

  • of Legionella bacillus.

    最も適した温度になると

  • Well, technology to the rescue.

    問題を起こすのです

  • So chemists got to work,

    さあ 技術の出番です

  • and they developed a bactericide

    科学者たちが殺菌剤を開発し

  • that became widely used in those systems.

    空調システムで広く

  • But something else happened in the early 1980s,

    使われるようになりました

  • and that was that there was a mysterious epidemic

    しかし 1980年代に別の問題が起こりました

  • of failures of tape drives

    不思議なことに

  • all over the United States.

    米国各地でテープドライブが

  • And IBM, which made them,

    動かなくなったのでした

  • just didn't know what to do.

    製造元のIBMは

  • They commissioned a group of their best scientists

    どうすればいいのか途方に暮れました

  • to investigate,

    社内の優秀な科学者たちを

  • and what they found was

    結集して調査にあたらせ

  • that all these tape drives

    問題のテープドライブは全て

  • were located near ventilation ducts.

    換気ダクトのすぐそばに

  • What happened was the bactericide was formulated

    置かれていたことを突き止めました

  • with minute traces of tin.

    実はこの殺菌剤には

  • And these tin particles were deposited on the tape heads

    少量のスズが含まれ

  • and were crashing the tape heads.

    そのスズ粒子がテープヘッドに

  • So they reformulated the bactericide.

    堆積して ヘッドを破壊したのです

  • But what's interesting to me

    殺菌剤の調合は変更されました

  • is that this was the first case

    興味深いのは 間接的とはいえ

  • of a mechanical device

    機械装置が初めて

  • suffering, at least indirectly, from a human disease.

    人と同じ病原菌に