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  • Well hey there I'm Emma from mmmEnglish!

  • Today we're going to go through the pronunciation of

  • these tricky words.

  • Do you find any of them difficult?

  • But before we do that, I want to tell you about

  • the community tab right here inside Youtube.

  • Now if you're a subscriber, you probably already know

  • about this. You've probably already seen

  • some of my posts, some of my pictures.

  • It's a cool way that we can hang out a little bit more.

  • Now I have to admit that I find social media

  • a little overwhelming. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter,

  • Snapchat, everywhere.

  • So I was really, really glad when YouTube

  • created a space where we can hang out together

  • and I can share pictures

  • and I can ask you for recommendations and

  • show you some behind the scenes sort of stuff.

  • So to be honest,

  • I would much rather be here chatting with you guys.

  • This is where I spend all of my time

  • and this is where I want to hang out with you.

  • In fact, this lesson today

  • came from my YouTube community.

  • I asked you what were some difficult words

  • to pronounce and Puji suggested:

  • 'girl', 'world' and other words that have RL in them.

  • So thanks for the recommendation Puji!

  • Okay back to the lesson!

  • What do all of these words have in common?

  • The R and the L at the end and also the vowel sound.

  • Yes, all of these words have different vowel letters

  • but we know that that doesn't mean much

  • in English, right?

  • These vowel letters are all pronounced in

  • exactly the same way,

  • with the /ɜː/ vowel sound.

  • So this is where your eyes start playing tricks

  • on you in English.

  • You see different vowel letters

  • and so you try to pronounce them differently.

  • Don't! This sound is the same for all of them.

  • To make this sound, your tongue is flat in your mouth.

  • The front of it, the front of your tongue should be behind

  • your bottom teeth like this.

  • If the sound still doesn't sound right, try pushing

  • your lower jaw out a little further

  • to lengthen your tongue.

  • Next we need to tackle the RL consonant cluster.

  • A consonant cluster is when two or more consonants

  • are together in a word and they can be

  • difficult to pronounce.

  • Often consonants are much easier

  • when there is a vowel sound between them, right?

  • But this cluster is actually pronounced differently

  • by different native English speakers.

  • So this could be part of the reason why this word

  • is difficult for you.

  • You keep hearing it being pronounced in different ways

  • and now you're a bit confused!

  • When listening to standard American pronunciation,

  • you'll hear both of these consonant sounds.

  • While when you're listening to standard British

  • or Australian pronunciation, you won't hear that /r/

  • consonant sound.

  • I'm going to ask my brother-in-law Alan

  • to help me to demonstrate this.

  • You remember him from this video, right?

  • He's American.

  • Hey Alan, can you say 'girl' for me?

  • Girl.

  • Great! Now use it in a sentence.

  • There is a very pretty girl walking down the street.

  • Perfect! Thanks, that's all I need.

  • So you just heard Alan really pronounce that /r/ sound.

  • In fact, the vowel sound is hardly there at all!

  • Girl.

  • Now this is not how I pronounce it at all.

  • In British English and Australian English,

  • this R is silent

  • and it's the vowel sound that is much clearer.

  • Girl.

  • So I'll be teaching in this lesson with my accent.

  • I won't be doing any rubbish American impersonations

  • but if you're really keen to learn to pronounce this word

  • in an American accent,

  • I've added a few extra links in the description

  • to American English pronunciation lessons

  • that I recommend you try.

  • Okay, so let's get started!

  • Girl.

  • So starting with the consonant sound.

  • Now this sound is made right at the back of the mouth.

  • By blocking the throat with the back of the tongue.

  • So moving into the vowel sound.

  • Notice that my tongue doesn't move, it doesn't

  • change position to the consonant sound.

  • It just stays with the vowel sound.

  • Nice! Now we need to move to the /l/ sound

  • and we do that by lifting the tip of the tongue up

  • so that it's behind the top teeth.

  • The girl is waiting by the door.

  • Is that your girlfriend?

  • Curl.

  • The /k/ consonant is the unvoiced

  • pair of the /g/ sound.

  • So actually, your tongue, your throat,

  • everything is in the same position.

  • It's just that one sound is voiced,

  • and the other is unvoiced and it's made with air.

  • See that my tongue is staying in exactly

  • the same position. It doesn't change.

  • Now moving to the /l/ sound,

  • we need to lift the tip of the tongue

  • so that it's touching behind the top teeth.

  • She helps her grandmother to curl her hair.

  • Let's try another.

  • Pearl.

  • and add the vowel.

  • Move to the /l/ sound by lifting the tongue

  • up to the top of her mouth, behind your teeth.

  • She had a beautiful pair of pearl earrings.

  • World.

  • This one's a little trickier.

  • Starting with the consonant sound, watch my lips.

  • See how they come together in a tight circle

  • and it's a voiced sound made with your vocal cords.

  • Now add the vowel sound.

  • It's exactly the same as this word here, 'were'.

  • Now do exactly as we did before,

  • flip your tongue up to the top of your mouth,

  • behind your teeth.

  • Now you're saying 'whirl'

  • and this means to spin around and around and around,

  • really quickly, 'whirl'.

  • So we need to finish with the

  • /d/ consonant sound, right?

  • At the end of 'whirl', my tongue is up behind my teeth.

  • Whirl.

  • And the rest of my tongue, the sides of my tongue,

  • it's not touching anything.

  • For the /d/ sound, you'll need to close the gap

  • with the edges of your tongue

  • here at the top of your mouth. Try to catch the sound

  • and then release it.

  • Your teeth will naturally come up closer together

  • as you try to do this.

  • So try to exaggerate the movement

  • that's happening in your jaw.

  • Your jaw is extending down and out to make the sound.

  • Remember if that sound is - if your jaw is too close

  • to your neck, you'll make a different sound.

  • So that movement and that length in your jaw

  • is going to help you to make the correct sound.

  • The whole world is watching.

  • It's the most beautiful place in the world.

  • Should we keep going with some more examples?

  • Why not?

  • Hurl.

  • So you might be thinking what on earth is 'hurl'?

  • It's actually a really useful word.

  • It means to throw something

  • and usually with a lot of force,

  • usually in an angry or a violent way.

  • He hurled the lamp across the room.

  • A really strong violent way.

  • Add the vowel.

  • Okay so that's this word, 'her'.

  • Then you need to add the /l/

  • so the tip of the tongue comes up

  • and you'll often hear 'hurl' used in these collocations.

  • 'to hurl abuse' or 'to hurl insults'

  • So this means to throw insults or abuse at someone,

  • to yell at them really loudly.

  • To hurl abuse at someone.

  • He hurled abuse at the waiter

  • as he was dragged out of the restaurant.

  • Ready to try a more complex sentence?

  • Let's try and put a few of these words together.

  • The world watched as the girl with the curly hair

  • hurled pills across the room.

  • The world watched as the girl with the curly hair

  • hurled pills across the room.

  • Can you think of any other words with this combination

  • of letters in them? Try to write a sentence with

  • these words in the comments

  • to help everyone else to practise here.

  • Write it in the comments.

  • So depending on your native language you will find

  • one way of pronouncing these words a little easier

  • than the other.

  • Perhaps the American 'girl' is easier for you

  • or maybe the British pronunciation 'girl'.

  • Whatever! It really doesn't matter.

  • My advice is to experiment with both pronunciations

  • and then just do what feels easiest

  • and most comfortable for you.

  • Both pronunciations are acceptable

  • and the most important thing is that you are understood

  • and that you feel comfortable making these sounds.

  • So do whatever helps you to feel most comfortable.

  • So that's it for this pronunciation lesson,

  • if you want to keep practising your pronunciation

  • with me, then check out these lessons right here.

  • Make sure you hit subscribe

  • if you haven't subscribed already

  • and I'll see you in the next lesson. Bye for now!

Well hey there I'm Emma from mmmEnglish!

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B1 中級

GIRL & WORLDの発音は? (How to pronounce GIRL & WORLD)

  • 36 5
    蔡天羽 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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