Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • How can landscapes imbue memory?

    風景はどのようにして記憶を呼び覚ますことができるのでしょうか?

  • When we think about this notion "e pluribus unum" --

    この概念を考えるとき、「e pluribus unum」--。

  • "out of many, one,"

    "多くの中の一人

  • it's a pretty strange concept, right?

    かなり変なコンセプトですよね。

  • I mean, with all different races and cultures of people,

    いろんな人種や文化の人がいる中で

  • how do you boil it down to one thing?

    どうやって一つに煮詰めるの?

  • I want to share with you today this idea of "e pluribus unum"

    今日はこの "e pluribus unum "という考え方を共有したいと思います。

  • and how our landscape might imbue those memories of diverse perspectives,

    そして、私たちの風景は、多様な視点からの記憶をどのように植え付けていくのでしょうか。

  • as well as force us to stop trying to narrow things down

    絞るのをやめさせてくれるだけでなく

  • to a single, clean set of identities.

    を単一のクリーンなアイデンティティのセットに変換することができます。

  • As an educator, designer,

    教育者として、デザイナーとして

  • I'd like to share with you five simple concepts

    私はあなたと5つの簡単な概念を共有したいと思います。

  • that I've developed through my work.

    仕事を通じて培ってきたものです。

  • And I'd like to share with you five projects

    そして、私はあなたと5つのプロジェクトを共有したいと思います。

  • where we can begin to see how the memory around us,

    身の回りの記憶がどのようになっているのかが見えてきます。

  • where things have happened,

    物事が起きた場所

  • can actually force us to look at one another in a different way.

    は、実際には別の方法でお互いを見ることを強制することができます。

  • And lastly: this is not just an American motto anymore.

    そして最後に:これはもう単なるアメリカのモットーではありません。

  • I think e pluribus unum is global.

    e pluribus unumはグローバルだと思います。

  • We're in this thing together.

    私たちは一緒にこれに参加しています。

  • First, great things happen when we exist in each other's world --

    まず、私たちがお互いの世界に存在するとき、素晴らしいことが起こります。

  • like today, right?

    今日みたいな感じですね。

  • The world of community gardens --

    コミュニティガーデンの世界

  • most of you have probably seen a community garden.

    ほとんどの方がコミュニティガーデンを見たことがあるのではないでしょうか。

  • They're all about subsistence and food. Right?

    彼らは自給自足と食料のことしか考えていない。だろ?

  • I'll tell you a little story,

    ちょっとしたお話をさせていただきます。

  • what happened in New York more than a decade ago.

    10年以上前にニューヨークで起こったこと。

  • They tried to sell all of their community gardens,

    彼らはコミュニティガーデンを全部売ろうとした。

  • and Bette Midler developed a nonprofit, the New York Restoration Project.

    とベット・ミドラーは、非営利団体「ニューヨーク・レストレーション・プロジェクト」を立ち上げました。

  • They literally brought all the gardens

    彼らは文字通りすべての庭園を持ってきた

  • and decided to save them.

    と言って救うことにしました。

  • And then they had another novel idea:

    そしてまた斬新なアイデアが出てきました。

  • let's bring in world-class designers

    世界に通用するデザイナーを呼び込もう

  • and let them go out into communities and make these beautiful gardens,

    そして、地域社会に出て行って、これらの美しい庭園を作るのです。

  • and maybe they might not just be about food.

    と、食べ物だけではないかもしれません。

  • And so they called me,

    そうして電話がかかってきました。

  • and I designed one in Jamaica, Queens.

    と、クイーンズ区のジャマイカでデザインしました。

  • And on the way to designing this garden,

    そして、この庭をデザインする途中で

  • I went to the New York Restoration Project Office,

    ニューヨーク維新プロジェクト事務局に行ってきました。

  • and I noticed a familiar name on the door downstairs.

    と、下の階のドアに見覚えのある名前があるのに気がついた。

  • I go upstairs, and I said,

    二階に行くと、私は言った。

  • "Do you guys know who is downstairs?"

    "下に誰がいるか知ってるの?"

  • And they said, "Gunit."

    そして、彼らは「ガニット」と言った。

  • And I said, "Gunit?

    と言ったら、「グニット?

  • You mean G-Unit?

    Gユニットのことか?

  • Curtis '50 Cent' Jackson?"

    カーティス '50セント'ジャクソン?"

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And they said, "Yeah?"

    "そうか?"って言われたんだ

  • And I said, "Yes."

    私は "はい "と言った

  • And so we went downstairs, and before you knew it,

    それで私たちは下に降りて、いつの間にか

  • Curtis, Bette and the rest of them formed this collaboration,

    カーティス、ベットらがコラボを結成。

  • and they built this garden in Jamaica, Queens.

    そして、彼らはこの庭をクイーンズ区のジャマイカに作った。

  • And it turned out Curtis, 50 Cent, grew up in Jamaica.

    そして50セントのカーティスはジャマイカで育ったことが判明した。

  • And so again, when you start bringing these worlds together --

    それで、もう一度言うが、これらの世界を一緒にし始めると...

  • me, Curtis, Bette --

    私、カーティス、ベット...

  • you get something more incredible.

    あなたはもっと信じられないものを手に入れる。

  • You get a garden

    あなたは庭を手に入れる

  • that last year was voted one of the top 10 secret gardens in New York.

    昨年はニューヨークのシークレットガーデンのトップ10の1つに選ばれました。

  • Right?

    だろ?

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • It's for young and old,

    若者も年配の方も。

  • but more importantly, it's a place --

    しかし、もっと重要なのは、それが場所だということです。

  • there was a story in the Times about six months ago

    半年前にタイムズに記事が載っていました

  • where this young woman found solace in going to the garden.

    この若い女性が庭に行くことに慰めを見出した場所。

  • It had nothing to do with me. It had more to do with 50, I'm sure,

    私には関係ない50歳の方が関係していたのは確かです。

  • but it has inspired people to think about gardens

    庭園について考えるきっかけになった

  • and sharing each other's worlds in a different way.

    と、お互いの世界を違う形で共有しています。

  • This next concept, "two-ness" --

    この次のコンセプトである「二人らしさ」--。

  • it's not as simple as I thought it would be to explain,

    説明するのは思ったほど簡単ではありません。

  • but as I left to go to college, my father looked at me,

    でも、大学に行くために出て行くとき、父は私を見ていました。

  • and said, "Junior, you're going to have to be both black and white

    と言って、「ジュニア、白と黒の両方になるんだよ。

  • when you go out there."

    "あなたがそこに行くとき"

  • And if you go back to the early parts of the 20th century,

    そして、20世紀初頭にさかのぼれば

  • W.E.B. Du Bois, the famous activist,

    有名な活動家、W.E.B.デュボワ。

  • said it's this peculiar sensation

    曰く、この独特の感覚だそうです。

  • that the Negro has to walk around

    黒人は歩き回らなければならない

  • being viewed through the lens of other people,

    他人のレンズを通して見られていること

  • and this two-ness, this double consciousness.

    と、この二重の意識。

  • And I want to argue that more than a hundred years later,

    そして、100年以上経ってから反論したいと思います。

  • that two-ness has made us strong and resilient,

    その二性が私たちを強くし、回復力のあるものにしてくれました。

  • and I would say for brown people, women --

    茶色い人や女性には...

  • all of us who have had to navigate the world through the eyes of others --

    他人の目を通して世界をナビゲートしなければならなかった私たち全員--。

  • we should now share that strength to the rest of those

    その力を他の人にも分けてあげよう

  • who have had the privilege to be singular.

    特異性を持っていた人は

  • I'd like to share with you a project,

    私はあなたとプロジェクトを共有したいと思います。

  • because I do think this two-ness can find itself in the world around us.

    私たちの周りの世界には、この2つの性質があると思うからです。

  • And it's beginning to happen where we're beginning to share these stories.

    そして、私たちはこれらの物語を共有し始めています。

  • At the University of Virginia,

    バージニア大学で

  • the academical village by Thomas Jefferson,

    トーマス・ジェファーソンの「学問の村」。

  • it's a place that we're beginning to notice now was built by African hands.

    アフリカ人の手によって建設されたことに気付き始めています。

  • So we have to begin to say,

    ということで、言い始めなければなりません。

  • "OK, how do we talk about that?"

    "わかった、どうやって話そうか?"

  • As the University was expanding to the south,

    大学が南に進出していく中で

  • they found a site that was the house of Kitty Foster,

    キティ・フォスターの家の跡地を発見しました。

  • free African American woman.

    自由なアフリカ系アメリカ人女性

  • And she was there,

    そして、彼女はそこにいた。

  • and her descendants,

    と彼女の子孫たち。

  • they all lived there,

    みんなそこに住んでいました。

  • and she cleaned for the boys of UVA.

    そして彼女はUVAの少年たちのために掃除をしていました。

  • But as they found the archaeology,

    しかし、彼らが考古学を発見したように

  • they asked me if I would do a commemorative piece.

    記念作品をやらないかと言われました。

  • So the two-ness of this landscape, both black and white ...

    だから、この風景は、黒と白の両方の2つの性質を持っています...

  • I decided to do a piece based on shadows and light.

    影と光をテーマにした作品を作ることにしました。

  • And through that, we were able to develop a shadow-catcher

    その中で、シャドウキャッチャーを開発することで

  • that would talk about this two-ness in a different way.

    この2つのことを別の方法で話すだろう

  • So when the light came down,

    それで光が降りてきたとき

  • there would be this ride to heaven.

    天国にはこの乗り物があるだろう

  • When there's no light, it's silent.

    光がない時は静かだ。

  • And in the landscape of Thomas Jefferson,

    そして、トーマス・ジェファーソンの風景の中で

  • it's a strange thing.

    それは不思議なものです。

  • It's not made of brick.

    レンガでできているわけではありません。

  • It's a strange thing,

    不思議なものです。

  • and it allows these two things to be unresolved.

    と、この2つのことが解決されないことを許してしまうのです。

  • And we don't have to resolve these things.

    そして、これらのことを解決する必要はありません。

  • I want to live in a world

    世界で生きたい

  • where the resolution --

    ここでは解像度が

  • there's an ambiguity between things,

    物事の間には曖昧さがあります。

  • because that ambiguity allows us to have a conversation.

    その曖昧さが会話を可能にしてくれるからです。

  • When things are clear and defined,

    物事が明確に定義されている時

  • we forget.

    私たちは忘れています。

  • The next example? Empathy.

    次の例は?共感です。

  • And I've heard that a couple of times in this conference,

    そして、この会議で何度か聞いたことがあります。

  • this notion of caring.

    この「思いやり」という概念を

  • Twenty-five years ago, when I was a young pup,

    25年前、私が若い子犬の頃。

  • very optimistic,

    非常に楽観的です。

  • we wanted to design a park in downtown Oakland, California

    カリフォルニア州オークランドのダウンタウンにある公園をデザインしたいと考えていました。

  • for the homeless people.

    ホームレスのために

  • And we said, homeless people can be in the same space

    そして、私たちは、ホームレスが同じ空間にいることができると言いました。

  • as people who wear suits.

    スーツを着ている人として

  • And everyone was like, "That's never going to work.

    そして、みんな「それは絶対にうまくいかない」と思っていました。

  • People are not going to eat lunch with the homeless people."

    ホームレスの人たちと一緒にお昼ご飯を食べようとする人はいません。"

  • We built the park.

    公園を作りました。

  • It cost 1.1 million dollars.

    110万ドルかかった。

  • We wanted a bathroom.

    バスルームが欲しかった。

  • We wanted horseshoes, barbecue pits, smokers,

    蹄鉄、バーベキューピット、スモーカーが欲しかった。

  • picnic tables, shelter and all of that.

    ピクニックテーブルやシェルターなどの

  • We had the design, we went to the then-mayor

    設計図があって、当時の市長のところに行ったんです。

  • and said, "Mr. Mayor, it's only going to cost you 1.1 million dollars."

    "市長さん、110万ドルで済むんですよ"

  • And he looked at me.

    そして、彼は私を見ていました。

  • "For homeless people?"

    "ホームレスのために?"

  • And he didn't give us the money.

    そして、彼は私たちにお金をくれませんでした。

  • So we walked out, unfettered, and we raised the money.

    だから、自由に歩いて出て行って、お金を集めたんです。

  • Clorox gave us money.

    クロロックスがお金をくれました。

  • The National Park Service built the bathroom.

    国立公園局がトイレを作ってくれました。

  • So we were able to go ahead

    だから私たちは先に行くことができました。

  • because we had empathy.

    共感を得られたからです。

  • Now, 25 years later,

    さて、25年後の今。

  • we have an even larger homeless problem in the Bay Area.

    ベイエリアのホームレスの問題がさらに大きくなっています。

  • But the park is still there,

    しかし、公園はまだある。

  • and the people are still there.

    と、人が残っています。

  • So for me, that's a success.

    だから私にとっては、これは成功です。

  • And when people see that,

    それを見た人が

  • hopefully, they'll have empathy for the people under freeways and tents,

    うまくいけば、彼らはフリーウェイやテントの下にいる人々に共感を持つことができるでしょう。

  • and why can't our public spaces

    そして、なぜ私たちの公共空間はできないのか

  • house them and force us to be empathetic?

    彼らを収容して、私たちに共感を強要するのか?

  • The image on the left is Lafayette Square Park today.

    左の画像は今日のラファイエット広場公園です。

  • The image on the right is 1906, Golden Gate Park after the earthquake.

    右の画像は1906年、地震後のゴールデンゲートパーク。

  • Why do we have to have cataclysmic events

    なぜ激動の出来事があるのか

  • to be empathetic?

    共感を得るために?

  • Our fellow men are out there starving,

    仲間が飢えている

  • women sleeping on the street, and we don't see them.

    路上で寝ている女性を見かけることはありません。

  • Put them in those spaces, and they'll be visible.

    それらのスペースに入れれば、目に見えるようになります。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • And to show you that there are still people out there with empathy,

    そして、共感できる人がまだいることを示すために。

  • the Oakland Raiders' Bruce Irvin

    オークランドレイダースブルース・アービン

  • fries fish every Friday afternoon

    毎週金曜日の午後に魚のフライ

  • for anyone who wants it.

    欲しい人のために

  • And by going to that park, that park became the vehicle for him.

    そして、その公園に行くことで、その公園が彼の乗り物になった。

  • The traditional belongs to all of us,

    伝統は私たち全員のものです。

  • and this is a simple one.

    と、これは簡単に言うと

  • You go into some neighborhoods -- beautiful architecture, beautiful parks --

    美しい建築物や美しい公園など、いくつかの地域に入っていきます。

  • but if people look a different way,

    が、人が違った見方をすれば

  • it's not traditional.

    伝統的なものではありません。

  • It's not until they leave and then new people come in

    それは、彼らが去って、新しい人が入ってくるまでではありません。

  • where the traditional gets valued.

    伝統が評価されるところ。

  • A little quick story here:

    ここで簡単な話をします。

  • 1888 opera house,

    1888年のオペラハウス。

  • the oldest in San Francisco,

    サンフランシスコで最も古い

  • sits in BayviewHunters Point.

    ベイビュー-ハンターズポイントに位置しています。

  • Over its history,

    その歴史の中で

  • it's provided theater,

    それは劇場を提供しています。

  • places for businesses, places for community gatherings, etc.

    商店街

  • It's also a place where Ruth Williams taught many black actors.

    ルース・ウィリアムズが多くの黒人俳優を教えた場所でもあります。

  • Think: Danny Glover --

    考えるんだダニー・グローバー

  • came from this place.

    ここから来ました。

  • But over time, with our 1980s federal practices,

    しかし、時が経つにつれ、1980年代の連邦の慣行では

  • a lot of these community institutions fell into disrepair.

    このような地域の施設の多くは荒廃していました。

  • With the San Francisco Arts Council, we were able to raise money

    サンフランシスコ・アーツカウンシルの協力を得て、資金を調達することができました。

  • and to actually refurbish the place.

    と実際に改装すること。

  • And we were able to have a community meeting.

    そして、コミュニティミーティングを行うことができました。

  • And within the community meeting, people got up and said,

    そして、コミュニティミーティングの中で、人々は立ち上がって言った。

  • "This place feels like a plantation. Why are we locked in?

    "ここは農園のような感じがするなぜ閉じ込められているのか?

  • Why can't we learn theater?"

    なぜ演劇を学べないのか?"

  • Over the years, people had started putting in chicken coops, hay bales,

    何年もかけて、人々は鶏小屋、干し草の俵を入れ始めました。

  • community gardens and all of these things,

    コミュニティ・ガーデンやこれらのすべてのもの。

  • and they could not see that traditional thing behind them.

    と、その伝統的なものを後ろで見ることができませんでした。

  • But we said, we're bringing the community back.

    しかし、私たちは地域を取り戻すと言いました。

  • American Disability Act -- we were able to get five million dollars.

    アメリカ障害者法では500万ドルを手に入れることができました。

  • And now, the tradition belongs to these brown and black people,

    そして今、伝統はこの茶色と黒の人々に属しています。

  • and they use it.

    と言って使っています。

  • And they learn theater,

    そして、彼らは演劇を学ぶ。

  • after-school programs.

    放課後プログラム。

  • There's no more chickens.

    鶏はもういません。

  • But there is art.

    しかし、そこには芸術がある。

  • And lastly, I want to share with you a project that we're currently working on,

    最後に、現在取り組んでいるプロジェクトをご紹介します。

  • and I think it will force us all to remember in a really different way.

    そして、それは本当に違う方法で私たちに記憶を強いることになると思います。

  • There are lots of things in the landscape around us,

    身の回りの風景にはたくさんのものがあります。

  • and most of the time we don't know what's below the ground.

    ほとんどの場合、地下に何があるかわからない。

  • Here in Charleston, South Carolina,

    ここはサウスカロライナ州チャールストン

  • a verdant piece of grass.

    青々とした草むら。

  • Most people just pass by it daily.

    ほとんどの人は毎日のように通り過ぎるだけです。

  • But underneath it,

    しかし、その下には

  • it's where they discovered Gadsden's Wharf.

    ガズデンの波止場を発見した場所だ

  • We think more than 40 percent of the African diaspora landed here.

    アフリカのディアスポラの40%以上がここに上陸したと考えています。

  • How could you forget that?

    よく忘れられたな

  • How could you forget?

    よく忘れられるな

  • So we dug, dug, and we found the wharf.

    掘って、掘って、埠頭を見つけた。

  • And so in 2020,

    そして、2020年には

  • Harry Cobb and myself and others

    ハリー・コブと私と他の人たち

  • are building the International African American Museum.

    は国際アフリカンアメリカン博物館を建設しています。

  • And it will celebrate --

    そして、それは祝う...

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • this place where we know, beneath the ground,

    私たちが知っているこの場所は、地中にあります。

  • thousands died, perished,

    何千人もの人が死んで、死んだ。

  • the food chain of the bay changed.

    湾内の食物連鎖が変わった

  • Sharks came closer to the bay.

    サメが湾内に近づいてきた。

  • It's where slaves were stored.

    奴隷が保管されていた場所です。

  • Imagine this hallowed ground.

    この神聖な場所を想像してみてください。

  • So in this new design, the ground will erupt,

    だから、この新しいデザインでは、地面が噴出します。

  • and it will talk about this tension that sits below.

    と、下に座っているこの緊張感について話してくれます。

  • The columns and the ground is made of tabby shales

    柱と地面はタビー頁岩でできています。

  • scooped up from the Atlantic,

    大西洋から掬い上げられた

  • a reminder of that awful crossing.

    酷い横断を思い出す

  • And as you make your way through on the other side,

    そして、反対側を通っていくと

  • you are forced to walk through the remains of the warehouse,

    倉庫の跡を歩かざるを得ない。

  • where slaves were stored

    奴隷置き場