Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • We do not choose where to be born.

    生まれてくる場所は選びません。

  • We do not choose who our parents are.

    親が誰であるかは選べません。

  • But we do choose how we are going to live our lives.

    しかし、私たちは自分の人生をどのように生きるかを選択します。

  • I did not choose to be born in South Sudan,

    私は南スーダンに生まれることを選びませんでした。

  • a country rife with conflict.

    紛争の多い国だ

  • I did not choose my name --

    名前を選んだのは私じゃない

  • Nyiriak,

    ニイリーク。

  • which means "war."

    戦争を意味する

  • I've always rejected it

    私はいつもそれを拒否してきた

  • and all the legacy it was born into.

    そして、それが生まれたすべての遺産。

  • I choose to be called Mary.

    私はメアリーと呼ばれることを選びました。

  • As a teacher, I've stood in front of 120 students,

    教師として、120人の生徒の前に立ったことがあります。

  • so this stage does not intimidate me.

    だからこのステージは私を脅迫していません。

  • My students come from war-torn countries.

    私の生徒たちは、戦争で疲弊した国から来ています。

  • They're so different from each other,

    彼らは、お互いに違いすぎます。

  • but they have one thing in common:

    が、共通していることがあります。

  • they fled their homes in order to stay alive.

    彼らは生き延びるために家から逃げたのです。

  • Some of them belong to parents back home in South Sudan

    その中には、南スーダンの実家のものもあります。

  • who are killing each other

    殺し合い

  • because they belong to a different tribe or they have a different belief.

    なぜなら、彼らは異なる部族に属していたり、異なる信念を持っているからです。

  • Others come from other African countries devastated by war.

    他にも、戦争で荒廃したアフリカの国々から来た人もいます。

  • But when they enter my class, they make friends,

    でも、クラスに入ると友達ができるんです。

  • they walk home together,

    一緒に歩いて帰ってくる

  • they do their homework together.

    一緒に宿題をするんです。

  • There is no hatred allowed in my class.

    私のクラスでは憎しみは許されません。

  • My story is like that of so many other refugees.

    私の話は、他の多くの難民と同じようなものです。

  • The war came when I was still a baby.

    私がまだ赤ちゃんの頃に戦争が来ました。

  • And my father,

    そして、私の父。

  • who had been absent in most of my early childhood,

    私の幼少期のほとんどの時間を欠席していた。

  • was doing what other men were doing:

    他の男がやっていたことをやっていた

  • fighting for the country.

    国のために戦う。

  • He had two wives and many children.

    彼には二人の妻と多くの子供がいた。

  • My mother was his second wife,

    母は二番目の妻だった。

  • married to him at the age of 16.

    16歳で結婚。

  • This is simply because my mother came from a poor background,

    これは単純に母が貧しい家庭の出身だからです。

  • and she had no choice.

    彼女には選択の余地がありませんでした

  • My father, on the other hand, was rich.

    一方、父は金持ちだった。

  • He had many cows.

    彼はたくさんの牛を飼っていました。

  • Gunshots were the order of the day.

    銃撃戦は日常茶飯事だった

  • My community was constantly under attack.

    私のコミュニティは常に攻撃を受けていました。

  • Communities would fight each other as they took water along the Nile.

    ナイル川に沿って水を得るために、コミュニティはお互いに争うことになるでしょう。

  • But that was not all.

    しかし、それだけではありませんでした。

  • Planes would drop the spinning and terrifying bombs

    飛行機は回転して恐ろしい爆弾を落とすだろう

  • that chopped off people's limbs.

    人の手足を切り落としたのよ

  • But the most terrifying thing for every single parent

    しかし、すべての親にとって最も恐ろしいことは

  • was to see their children being abducted and turned into young soldiers.

    子供たちが拉致されて若い兵士になっているのを見ていました。

  • My mother dug a trench

    母は溝を掘った

  • that soon became our home.

    それはすぐに私たちの家になりました。

  • But yet, we did not feel protected.

    しかし、それでも守られているという実感はありませんでした。

  • She had to flee in search of a safe place for us.

    彼女は安全な場所を求めて逃げなければならなかった。

  • I was four years old, and my younger sister was two.

    私は4歳、妹は2歳でした。

  • We joined a huge mass of people,

    大勢で参加しました。

  • and together we walked for many agonizing days

    共に歩んで苦しい日々を過ごした

  • in search of a secure place.

    安全な場所を求めて

  • But we could barely rest

    しかし、私たちはやっと休むことができました

  • before we were attacked again.

    再び攻撃される前に

  • I remember my mother was pregnant,

    母が妊娠していたのを覚えています。

  • when she would take turns to carry me and my younger sister.

    私と妹を交代で抱っこしてくれていた時のことです。

  • We finally made it across the Kenyan border, yes.

    やっとケニアの国境を越えたんだ、はい。

  • But that was the longest journey that I have ever had in my whole life.

    しかし、それは私の人生の中で最も長い旅だった。

  • My feet were raw with blisters.

    足が水ぶくれで生焼けになっていました。

  • To our surprise,

    驚いたことに

  • we found other family members who had fled into the camp earlier on,

    以前にキャンプに逃げ込んだ他の家族を見つけました

  • where you all are today,

    今日はどこにいるのかな?

  • the Kakuma camp.

    角間陣営。

  • Now, I want you all to be very quiet just for a moment.

    今、皆さんには静かにしていてもらいたいのですが

  • Do you hear that?

    聞こえるか?

  • The sound of silence.

    沈黙の音。

  • No gunshots.

    銃声はありません。

  • Peace, at last.

    やっと平和が訪れた

  • That was my first memory of this camp.

    それがこの合宿の最初の思い出です。

  • When you move from a war zone

    戦地から移動する場合

  • and come to a secure place like Kakuma,

    と角間のような安全な場所に来てください。

  • you've really gone far.

    あなたは本当に遠くに行ってしまいました。

  • I only stayed in the camp for three years, though.

    といっても、私は3年間しか滞在していませんが。

  • My father, who had been absent in most of my early childhood,

    幼少期のほとんどの時間を欠席していた父。

  • came back into my life.

    私の人生に戻ってきました。

  • And he organized for me to move with my uncle

    叔父と一緒に引っ越すための準備をしてくれた

  • to our family in Nakuru.

    ナクルの家族に

  • There, I found my father's first wife,

    そこで私は父の最初の妻を見つけました。

  • my half sisters and my half brothers.

    私の異母妹と異母兄弟が

  • I got enrolled in school.

    学校に入学しました。

  • I remember my first day in school -- I could sing and laugh again --

    初登校の日のことを覚えています -- 歌って笑うことができました--。

  • and my first set of school uniforms, you bet.

    私の最初の制服もね

  • It was amazing.

    素晴らしかったです。

  • But then I came to realize

    でも、気がついたら

  • that my uncle did not find it fit for me to go to school,

    叔父は私が学校に行くのに適していないと思っていました。

  • simply because I was a girl.

    単純に女の子だったから

  • My half brothers were his first priority.

    異母兄弟が最優先だった。

  • He would say, "Educating a girl is a waste of time."

    "女の子を教育するのは時間の無駄 "と言うだろう。

  • And for that reason, I missed many days of school,

    そのためか、学校に行けない日が多くなってしまいました。

  • because the fees were not paid.

    料金が支払われていなかったからです。

  • My father stepped in

    父が踏み込んできた

  • and organized for me to go to boarding school.

    と整理して、寄宿学校に行くことにしました。

  • I remember the faith that he put in me over the couple of years to come.

    数年後の数年間、彼が私にかけてくれた信仰を覚えています。

  • He would say, "Education is an animal that you have to overcome.

    彼は「教育は克服しなければならない動物だ」と言うだろう。

  • With an education, you can survive.

    学歴があれば生き残れる。

  • Education shall be your first husband."

    "教育はあなたの最初の夫となる"

  • And with these words came in his first big investment.

    そして、この言葉とともに、彼の最初の大きな投資に入ってきました。

  • I felt lucky!

    運がいい!と感じました。

  • But I was missing something:

    でも、何かが足りなかった。

  • my mother.

    私の母です。

  • My mother had been left behind in the camp,

    母は収容所に取り残されていました。

  • and I had not seen her since I left it.

    と言っていたので、その場を離れてからは会っていませんでした。

  • Six years without seeing her was really long.

    6年も会わなかったのは本当に長かった。

  • I was alone,

    私は一人でした。

  • in school,

    学校で。

  • when I heard of her death.

    彼女の死を聞いた時

  • I've seen many people back in South Sudan

    南スーダンに戻って多くの人を見てきました。

  • lose their lives.

    命を失う。

  • I've heard from neighbors

    近所の人から聞いたことがあります。

  • lose their sons, their husbands,

    息子や夫を失います

  • their children.

    彼らの子供たち。

  • But I never thought that that would ever come into my life.

    でも、まさかそんなことが私の人生に起こるとは思ってもいませんでした。

  • A month earlier, my stepmother,

    一ヶ月前に義母が

  • who had been so good to me back in Nakuru, died first.

    ナクルでお世話になっていた人が先に死んでしまった。

  • Then I came to realize that after giving birth to four girls,

    そして、4人の女の子を出産して気がついたのです。

  • my mother had finally given birth to something

    おふくろが産んでくれた

  • that could have made her be accepted into the community --

    それが彼女をコミュニティに受け入れさせたのかもしれません。

  • a baby boy,

    男の子の赤ちゃん

  • my baby brother.

    私の赤ちゃんの弟。

  • But he, too,

    でも、彼も。

  • joined the list of the dead.

    死者のリストに加わった

  • The most hurting part for me

    私にとって一番傷ついた部分

  • was the fact that I wasn't able to attend my mother's burial.

    私は母の葬儀に参列できなかったという事実がありました。

  • I wasn't allowed.

    私は許されていませんでした。

  • They said her family did not find it fit

    彼女の家族はそれが合うとは思わなかったと言っていた

  • for her children, who are all girls, to attend her burial,

    彼女の子供たちのために 埋葬に参加させてあげてください

  • simply because we were girls.

    単純に女の子だからというだけの理由で

  • They would lament to me and say,

    と嘆きながら言ってくれます。

  • "We are sorry, Mary, for your loss.

    "お悔やみ申し上げます、メアリーさん。

  • We are sorry that your parents never left behind any children."

    ご両親が子供を残さなかったことが残念です。"

  • And I would wonder:

    と、私は疑問に思います。

  • What are we?

    我々は何者なのか?

  • Are we not children?

    私たちは子供じゃないの?

  • In the mentality of my community,

    自分の地域のメンタリティの中で

  • only the boy child counted.

    男の子の子だけが数えられていました。

  • And for that reason, I knew this was the end of me.

    そのために、これが私の終わりだと思ったのです。

  • But I was the eldest girl.

    でも、私は長女でした。

  • I had to take care of my siblings.

    兄弟の面倒を見なければならなかった。

  • I had to ensure they went to school.

    確実に学校に行くようにしなければならなかった。

  • I was 13 years old.

    13歳の時のことです。

  • How could I have made that happen?

    どうしたらそんなことになるんだろう?

  • I came back to the camp to take care of my siblings.

    兄弟の面倒を見ようと合宿に戻ってきました。

  • I've never felt so stuck.

    こんなに動けなくなったのは初めてだ。

  • But then, one of my aunts, Auntie Okoi,

    そんな中、おばちゃんの一人であるオコイおばちゃんが

  • decided to take my sisters.

    姉妹を連れて行くことにしました。

  • My father sent me money from Juba for me to go back to school.

    父がジュバからお金を送ってきてくれて、学校に戻ってきてくれました。

  • Boarding school was heaven, but it was also so hard.

    寄宿学校は天国でしたが、それもまた大変でした。

  • I remember during the visiting days when parents would come to school,

    参観日の頃は、親が学校に来てくれたのを覚えています。

  • and my father would miss.

    父は寂しがっていた

  • But when he did come,

    しかし、彼が来た時

  • he repeated the same faith in me.

    彼は私に同じ信仰を繰り返していました。

  • This time he would say,

    今度は彼が言う。

  • "Mary, you cannot go astray,

    "メアリー、迷子になってはいけない。

  • because you are the future of your siblings."

    "君は兄弟の未来だから"

  • But then, in 2012,

    しかし、2012年には

  • life took away the only thing that I was clinging on.

    人生は私がしがみついていた唯一のものを奪い去った。

  • My father died.

    父が死んだ

  • My grades in school started to collapse,

    学校での成績が崩れ始めました。

  • and when I sat for my final high school exams in 2015,

    と、2015年に高校最後の試験を受けた時のことです。

  • I was devastated to receive a C grade.

    C判定を受けて愕然としました。

  • OK, I keep telling students in my class,

    OK、私はクラスの生徒に言い続けています。

  • "It's not about the A's; it's about doing your best."

    "それはAのことではなく ベストを尽くすことだ"

  • That was not my best.

    それは私のベストではありませんでした。

  • I was determined.

    決意していました。

  • I wanted to go back and try again.

    もう一度行ってみたいと思いました。

  • But my parents were gone.

    でも、両親はいなくなってしまった。

  • I had no one to take care of me,

    世話をしてくれる人がいなかった。

  • and I had no one to pay that fee.

    と、その料金を払う人がいなかった。

  • I felt so hopeless.

    絶望的な気持ちになりました。

  • But then, one of my best friends,

    そんな中、親友の一人が

  • a beautiful Kenyan lady, Esther Kaecha,

    ケニアの美しい女性、エスター・カエチャ。

  • called me during this devastating moment,

    この壊滅的な瞬間に私に電話をかけてきました。

  • and she was like, "Mary, you have a strong will.

    と言って、「メアリー、あなたは強い意志を持っていますね」と言っていました。

  • And I have a plan, and it's going to work."

    私には計画があります、それはうまくいくでしょう。"

  • OK, when you're in those devastating moments, you accept anything, right?

    壊滅的な時には、何でも受け入れるんだな?

  • So the plan was, she organized some travel money

    計画では、彼女は旅費を計画していました。

  • for us to travel to Anester Victory Girls High School.

    アネスター・ビクトリー女子高校への旅行のために

  • I remember that day so well.

    あの日のことはよく覚えています。

  • It was raining when we entered the principal's office.

    校長室に入ると雨が降っていました。

  • We were shaking like two chickens that had been rained on,

    雨に降られた二羽の鶏のように揺れていました。

  • and we looked at him.

    と言って彼を見ていました。

  • He was asking, "What do you want?"

    彼は "何が欲しいの?"と聞いていた

  • And we looked at him with the cat face.

    と、猫顔で見ていました。

  • "We just want to go back to school."

    "学校に戻りたいだけ"

  • Well, believe it or not, he not only paid our school fees

    信じられないかもしれませんが 彼は学費を払ってくれただけでなく

  • but also our uniform and pocket money for food.

    でも、私たちの制服や食費のお小遣いも。

  • Clap for him.

    彼に拍手を

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • When I finished my high school career,

    高校時代のキャリアを終えた時

  • I became the head girl.

    女将になりました。

  • And when I sat for the KCSE for a second time,

    2回目のKCSEの試験を受けた時も

  • I was able to receive a B minus. Clap.

    Bマイナスを受けることができました。拍手喝采。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • So I really want to say thank you to Anester Victory, Mr. Gatimu

    というわけで、アネスタービクトリーさん、ガチムチさん、本当にありがとうございました。

  • and the whole Anester fraternity for giving me that chance.

    私にチャンスを与えてくれた アネスター友の会の皆さんにも

  • From time to time,

    時折、その時々から。

  • members of my family will insist that my sister and I should get married

    姉にも嫁にも行けと言われる

  • so that somebody will take care of us.

    誰かが私たちの面倒を見てくれるように

  • They will say,

    彼らは言うだろう。

  • "We have a man for you."

    "あなたのための男がいる"

  • I really hate the fact that people took us as property rather than children.

    子供というよりも財産とされたことが本当に嫌いです。

  • Sometimes they will jokingly say,

    と冗談めかして言ってくることもあります。

  • "You are going to lose your market value

    "あなたの市場価値を失うことになります

  • the more educated you become."

    "教養があればあるほど"

  • But the truth is,

    しかし、真実は

  • an educated woman is feared in my community.

    教養のある女性は私の地域では恐れられています。

  • But I told them, this is not what I want.

    でも、これは私が望んでいることではないと伝えました。

  • I don't want to get kids at 16 like my mother did.

    母のように16歳で子供を作りたくない。

  • This is not my life.

    これは私の人生ではありません。

  • Even though my sisters and I are suffering,

    姉妹や私が苦しんでいても

  • there's no way we are heading in that direction.

    その方向に向かうことはありません。

  • I refuse to repeat history.

    私は歴史を繰り返すことを拒否します。

  • Educating a girl will create equal and stable societies.

    女の子を教育することで、平等で安定した社会を作ることができます。

  • And educated refugees will be the hope

    そして、教育を受けた難民が希望となる。

  • of rebuilding their countries someday.

    いつかは国を再建したいと思っています

  • Girls and women have a part to play in this

    女の子や女性にも役割があります。

  • just as much as men.

    男と同じように

  • Well, we have men in my family that encourage me to move on:

    私の家族には私を励ましてくれる男性がいます。

  • my half brothers and also my half sisters.

    私の腹違いの兄弟と腹違いの姉妹も。

  • When I finished my high school career,

    高校時代のキャリアを終えた時

  • I moved my sisters to Nairobi, where they live with my stepsister.

    姉たちをナイロビに引っ越して、義姉と一緒に暮らしています。

  • They live 17 people in a house.

    一軒家で17人暮らし。

  • But don't pity us.

    しかし、私たちを憐れむことはない。

  • The most important thing is that they all get a decent education.

    一番大事なのは、みんなまともな教育を受けていること。

  • The winners of today

    今日の優勝者は

  • are the losers of yesterday,

    は昨日の敗者です。

  • but who never gave up.

    しかし、決してあきらめなかった人。

  • And that is who we are,

    そして、それが私たちの正体です。

  • my sisters and I.

    姉妹と私。

  • And I'm so proud of that.

    それを誇りに思っています。

  • My biggest investment in life --

    私の人生最大の投資は

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • is the education of my sisters.

    は姉妹の教育です。

  • Education creates an equal and fair chance for everyone to make it.

    教育は、誰もが平等に公平にチャンスを作るものです。

  • I personally believe education is not all about the syllabus.

    個人的には、教育はシラバスが全てではないと思っています。

  • It's about friendship.

    それは友情のことです。

  • It's about discovering our talents.

    それは自分の才能を発見することです。

  • It's about discovering our destiny.

    それは、自分の運命を発見することです。

  • I will, for example, not forget the joy that I had

    例えば、私は、私が持っていた喜びを忘れません。

  • when I first had singing lessons in school,

    初めて学校で歌のレッスンを受けた時

  • which is still a passion of mine.

    それは今でも私の情熱です。