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  • Well hello! I'm Emma from mmmEnglish!

  • Today I want to share an important tip

  • to help you improve your English pronunciation.

  • Actually, I'll share a couple of tips but they all relate

  • to the pronunciation of past tense regular verbs.

  • Now the spelling of regular verbs is easy!

  • You just take the regular verb and you add a D or an -ed

  • to the end of the infinitive form.

  • So some examples:

  • 'want' becomes 'wanted'

  • 'asked' becomes 'asked'

  • and 'rain' becomes 'rained'.

  • Or if the verb actually ends in a Y, then usually

  • we replace that Y with an I and then add -ed

  • 'spied' and 'replied'

  • But the pronunciation of these simple verbs

  • is not quite that simple

  • but that's okay we're going to spend some time today

  • going over three simple rules

  • that you need to remember to help you pronounce

  • these verbs correctly.

  • But before we get started, I want to ask you a question.

  • Have you subscribed to the mmmEnglish channel yet?

  • Yes?

  • Awesome!

  • Make sure you let me know in the comments

  • so that I can give you a virtual high five

  • just to thank you for support.

  • If you haven't subscribed yet, it's so simple!

  • All you need to do is hit that red button just down there.

  • And one more thing, if you haven't watched my lesson

  • about irregular verbs yet,

  • I'm going to put it up here for you.

  • Since we're talking about regular verbs in this lesson,

  • it will be helpful to compare the pronunciation

  • between regular verbs and irregular verbs.

  • So check it out after you watch this lesson.

  • Okay past tense regular verbs.

  • So for regular verbs, the form is the same

  • in the past simple and the past participle forms.

  • Handy, right?

  • The first thing that you need to know

  • is that there are actually three different ways

  • to pronounce the -ed at the end of a past tense verb.

  • Three.

  • /ɪd/

  • /d/

  • and /t/

  • The good news is there are three simple rules

  • to remember that will help you to pronounce

  • these words correctly.

  • Firstly -ed can be pronounced as /ɪd/

  • so this is an unstressed vowel sound and it creates an

  • extra syllable which is always unstressed.

  • So the sound is short and it's low in pitch.

  • And it's pronounced like this when the regular verb,

  • in its infinitive form, ends in a T or a D sound.

  • 'need' becomes 'needed'

  • 'last' becomes 'lasted'

  • 'plead' becomes 'pleaded'

  • 'accept' becomes 'accepted'

  • 'waste' becomes 'wasted'

  • and 'wait' becomes 'waited'

  • Okay so these ones are kind of simple,

  • the extra unstressed vowel sound makes them

  • quite easy to pronounce.

  • 'waited'

  • 'needed

  • The other two ways to pronounce the past tense

  • regular form don't include that vowel sound

  • which means that it doesn't create this extra syllable

  • and it does create a cluster of consonants

  • at the end of the word and as many of you know,

  • a cluster of consonants,

  • that's a group of consonants, can often be

  • really quite difficult to pronounce.

  • So let's take a closer look.

  • When a verb in its infinitive form ends in a voiced

  • consonant sound, we pronounce the -ed

  • at the end of the word as /d/

  • not /ɪd/

  • but /d/

  • There's no vowel sound there, right?

  • But what's a voiced consonant sound?

  • I can hear you asking.

  • Well I've already got a lesson that explains

  • this in more detail right here, but I'll give you

  • the short version right now.

  • These are the voiced consonant sounds.

  • /g/ as in good.

  • /l/ as in love.

  • /r/ as in red.

  • /v/ as in vet.

  • /z/ as in zoo.

  • /w/ as in well.

  • /n/ as in new.

  • /m/ as in mum.

  • /ŋ/ as in sing, the -ng at the end.

  • /ð/ as in this.

  • /ʒ/ as in vision.

  • And /dʒ/ as in jam.

  • Right so if the infinitive verb

  • ends in one of these sounds, then the -ed is pronounced

  • as /d/

  • 'allow' ending in the /w/ voiced consonant sound

  • becomes 'allowed'

  • not 'allow-ed'.

  • No. This is a really, really common error.

  • It's not 'allow-ed'

  • but 'allowed'.

  • It's not 'sai-led'

  • but 'sailed'

  • 'waved'

  • 'rained'

  • 'rubbed'

  • 'loved'

  • 'gazed'

  • 'judged'

  • Okay so a quick note on my Australian accent.

  • In Australia, we don't pronounce

  • the final /r/ consonant sound

  • when it follows a vowel sound.

  • So this is the same

  • for standard British English pronunciation.

  • You can learn more about the differences in accents

  • in this video here where I talk about the differences

  • between American and British English.

  • But this difference in pronunciation, it doesn't affect

  • the pronunciation rules for past tense regular verbs

  • because vowel sounds are also voiced sounds

  • just like the /r/ sound.

  • So regardless of whether you pronounce the /r/ or not,

  • the -ed will be pronounced as a /d/ sound

  • like 'feared' and 'feared'.

  • That's again my excellent, excellent American accent

  • but this also means that if a regular verb

  • ends in a vowel sound like 'spy' for example,

  • then the -ed is pronounced as a /d/ as well.

  • 'spied' not 'spy-ed'

  • Okay rule number three.

  • When a verb in it's infinitive form ends in an unvoiced

  • consonant sound, we pronounce the -ed as a /t/

  • so not /ɪd/, not /d/

  • but /t/

  • So that is an unvoiced sound.

  • So again there's no vowel sound, it's a single consonant

  • sound that is added to the end of the infinitive verb form

  • so some of the unvoiced consonant sounds are

  • /p/ in tape

  • /s/ in face

  • /ch/ in watch

  • /sh/ in wash

  • /f/ in laugh

  • Now this can be a little tricky when the verb form

  • already has a cluster of consonants at the end

  • like the /sk/ in 'ask' or the /ks/ in 'relax'

  • So 'ask' becomes 'asked',

  • 'relax' becomes 'relaxed'

  • so these are a little tricky because they have

  • a crazy group of consonants at the end

  • that you've got to try and get your tongue around.

  • Okay a quick review before we practise.

  • If the verb in the infinitive form ends in the sound /t/

  • or /d/ it's pronounced /ɪd/

  • If the verb in the infinitive form ends in a voiced sound,

  • then the -ed is pronounced as /d/

  • And if the verb in it's infinitive form, ends in an

  • unvoiced sound,

  • then we pronounce the -ed as a /t/ sound.

  • If you want to improve your pronunciation and sound

  • more like a native English speaker,

  • then you really need to work on pronouncing

  • these past tense verbs correctly.

  • They're so simple and so common.

  • 'wanted'

  • 'needed'

  • 'loved'

  • 'sailed'

  • 'asked'

  • 'laughed'

  • Okay, so before we finish,

  • let's practise with a few sentences because it's easy

  • to practise these words when they're on their own, right?

  • It's much more of a challenge when spoken quickly

  • in a sentence, right?

  • Have you noticed the verbs here?

  • And have you been thinking about

  • the correct way to pronounce them?

  • 'hated'

  • 'wasted'

  • 'starved'

  • She hated to see good food wasted while others starved

  • What verbs can you see there?

  • 'waited'

  • 'sailed'

  • 'laughed'

  • 'realised'

  • 'escaped'

  • He waited until the ship sailed away

  • and then laughed when he realised he had escaped!

  • He waited until the ship sailed away

  • and then laughed when he realised he had escaped!

  • Last one.

  • 'misjudged'

  • 'seemed'

  • 'phoned'

  • I think I misjudged his character.

  • He seemed pleasant and professional

  • when I phoned him yesterday.

  • I think I misjudged his character.

  • He seemed pleasant and professional

  • when I phoned him yesterday.

  • Well that's it for this lesson I'm afraid.

  • I hope that you've learned a couple of new

  • pronunciation tips and that you are feeling

  • more confident and sounding more natural

  • when you're using English.

  • To keep practising and improving

  • your English pronunciation, then come and try one of my

  • imitation lessons right here.

  • That's where you'll get to train by copying

  • a native English speaker as they speak.

  • And of course, subscribe to my channel just down here

  • if you haven't already

  • and I'll see you next week for another lesson.

  • Bye for now!

Well hello! I'm Emma from mmmEnglish!

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3 Simple Pronunciation Tips Past Tense English Verbs

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    蔡天羽   に公開 2018 年 08 月 20 日
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