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  • number one Fairleads, Chocks, Bitts, Bollards and Dolphins Whaat??

  • Which is which?

  • So Fairleads have a roller attached to them, its purpose is to guide mooring lines.

  • Like these ones.

  • Chocks are structural reinforcements to direct the mooring lines to or from shore.

  • These guys are like hybrid roller fairleads chock, we call them roller chocks.

  • They are also used to guide mooring lines.

  • Bollards are mostly found ashore for securing mooring lines.

  • Sometimes you can also find them on ships.

  • Bitts are just double bollards, on my ship they are used for securing tug lines or fire

  • lines.

  • Dolhpins are well these guys .

  • Piles driven into the seabed to provide a platform or fixing point.

  • So from afar you'd think it's a beacon or buoy.

  • They can be used as moorings but for big ships I've never used them.

  • Second one is Chanel, Strait, and Canals

  • Strait is a narrow water body connecting two larger water bodies, such as Singapore strait

  • or strait of Gibraltar.

  • Most importantly , they are naturally formed.

  • Channels are simply much wider straits, like the English Channel

  • Canals on the other hand is man-made straits, artificial dug by humans.

  • Such as Suez Canal, Panama Canal.

  • Third Gulf and Bay

  • This one is quite confusing because the terminology is not defined.

  • Gulf is enclosed by two or more provinces or state or country and connected to another sea

  • Bay is still enclosed on 3 sides by land, but with a wide mouth that opens into the

  • ocean or another water body.

  • Most of them are circular or semi-circular Ie.

  • So you can have a small beach that is considered a bay,or something as large as Hudson Bay

  • Bay of Bengal is a big exception, even though

  • its way bigger than than gulf of mexico, its still considered a bay.

  • Fourth, Astern stern?

  • Abeam, beam?

  • Astern and Abeam are directions.

  • For example if the ship was moving backwards, I'd say engine's moving astern.

  • Stern without the a, is the aft end of the vessel.

  • abeam is 90degree looking out from the bridge and beam is usually the location perpendicular

  • to the bridge.

  • Fifth Tidal Stream and Current

  • They aren't the same thing.

  • Tidal Stream is as its name suggest cause by Tidal factors, ie rising and falling of

  • water level due to astronomical forces, mainly the moon.

  • So it can change throughout the day.

  • Current on the other hand is cause by wind and thermohaline aka temperature and salt

  • imbalance.

  • Sixth Weather-tight and Water-tight Door Weather tight doors are usually found above

  • the the main deck.

  • Watertight doors are under the water-line such as the ones in cargo hold.

  • Main difference is that watertight can handle heavy water pressure from both sides, say

  • for example submerged.

  • Weather Tight means it should not leak under heavy sea condition.

  • However the confusing part is that sometimes they look very similar.

  • Back when I was cadet I thought the spin wheel ones are watertight.

  • That's not always the case.

  • The only way to make sure is ofcourse by checking the general arrangement, aka blueprint of

  • the ship.

  • Seventh Gross Tonnage and Net Tonnage This one I always have trouble remembering,

  • its one of those things that I leave behind at school.

  • Gross Tonnage is the volume of all enclosed spaces on ship including Engine Room, Bow

  • thruster room, Stores, Accommodation etc.

  • While Net Tonnage is the cargo carrying spaces on the ship.

  • So its like measuring the money making capability of the ship.

  • Why does this matter?

  • Well a lot of port, anchorages and pilotage fees are calculated based on Net Tonnage.

  • So if you used gross tonnage you might be paying a lot more.

  • Eighth A Hitch?

  • A knot?

  • A knot is used to join two ropes together or a rope to itself.

  • If done correctly a knot will hold it shape regardless of it being fixed to something

  • else.

  • A hitch is used to fix a rope to another object, such as a pole, and relies on that object

  • to hold.

  • Nineth Draft and Depth.

  • One of the port state control inspector came on my ship and asked what's the available

  • draft displaying on the ECIDIS, now obviously I didn't want to correct him and embarrassed

  • him.

  • I knew he meant to ask whats the available depth in that area.

  • Depth is the how much available water there is, or how deep.

  • Draft is how deep the ship is sitting in the water.

  • Its one of those terms that just rolls off the tongue accidently sometimes.

  • Tenth one is Superstructure and Accommodation Structure

  • Superstructure is by definition a construction above existing structure.

  • So in shipping it is everything above main deck except any mast or sails.

  • While Accommodation well.. is simply only the living area.

  • A good example would be the monkey island and funnel.

  • It is part of the superstructure but not accommodation.

  • 11th Derricks and Crankes This one I am not completely sure so if I

  • have it wrong, let me know in the comments down below.

  • A derrick's lateral and vertical motion is controlled by one set line and the lifiting

  • is done on a separate set of line.

  • Usually involve some sort of pulley system.

  • They are more stationary.

  • A crane main difference is that they have a lot more freedom to move around.

  • Mostly operates on gears and hydraulics.

  • Container gantry crane for example can move the base on wheels and move loads up down

  • left right anywhere, some can swing almost up to 360 only limited by limit switch.

  • 12th Swinging Circle And Turning Cricle One of my cadets was confused about this one.

  • Swining Cricle is used in anchoring to draw out the limits, see my anchoring video here

  • A turning Cricle is the vessel's manoeuvring characteristics.

  • Simply put, it shows how the ship will behave when putting the wheel at hard over.

  • 13th Gangways and Accommodation ladder.

  • Gangway are setup perpendicular to the ship, think cruise ships.

  • Accommodation ladders are are set up inline with the ship's length.

  • Can be used in conjunction with pilot ladders.

  • This is the one my ships always mix up, everyone including myself call our accommodation ladder

  • as gangway.

  • 14th Capstan and Windlass On yachts or sailings boat, the two terms

  • can be interchangeable.

  • On larger commercial ships windlass has a horizontal axis, while capstan has vertical

  • axis.

  • 15th Density and Specific Gravity This one is more for tanker people, which

  • I never worked on tankers but Density is mass over volume so think comparing

  • the difference between water and thick clay or cement.

  • Specific Gravity is a ratio of the density to the denity of another reference substance.

  • IF you are an engineer most likely you'd have to record it in the log book or something

  • after bunkering.

  • Let know in the comments below how many you know correctly, share with your sailor friends

  • and see how many they know.

  • Thanks for watching, see you next time.

number one Fairleads, Chocks, Bitts, Bollards and Dolphins Whaat??

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B2 中上級

船長でも勘違いする航海用語15選!? (15 Nautical Terms Even Captains Get Wrong!?)

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    吳易晉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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