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  • - If you're buying a PC for video editing,

  • then there's a few key things you need to keep in mind

  • to really maximize your video editing performance.

  • In this video, we'll step through the key features,

  • the specs, and components to consider

  • if you wanna maximize the performance

  • of your next video editing PC.

  • (electronic music)

  • Hey, it's Justin Brown here from Primal Video,

  • where we help entrepreneurs and business owners

  • amplify their business and brand with video.

  • If you're new here,

  • then make sure you click that subscribe button,

  • and all the links to everything we mention in this video,

  • you can find the link in the description box below.

  • Let's jump into it.

  • Now there's a lot of options out there

  • when it comes to PC parts and components,

  • and a massive range of features to chose from.

  • If you're building or buying a PC for video editing,

  • then there's some key decisions

  • that can make a big difference

  • to your overall editing performance and workflow.

  • Recently, it was time for us to upgrade

  • our main video editing PC.

  • So we thought it would be a great time run through

  • the key things anyone else in the same boat

  • should consider when deciding what to get.

  • Now fortunately for us,

  • right as we were looking at upgrading,

  • one of my favorite PC and component manufacturer,

  • MSI, reached out to us

  • and offered to send us a pretty awesome new system.

  • Now, I actually used to work in a computer shop,

  • building gaming PCs,

  • and they were always one of my go-to manufacturers

  • for solid quality and always having

  • a big focus on performance.

  • So I was pretty pumped when they reached out.

  • So here is what they sent us.

  • And we'll be using this as a guide

  • to step you through the key decisions

  • when deciding what systems and parts you should use

  • when you're buying your own system.

  • So before we jump in,

  • I do wanna be completely clear

  • that this PC and all of its components

  • were provided by MSI at no cost to us.

  • So, technically, this is a sponsored video.

  • As always though, before we agreed to accepting it,

  • we provided them with our standard terms.

  • It sounds great, but we'll only ever present

  • our full, unfiltered, unbiased opinions,

  • both good and bad.

  • So not only did they agree,

  • they insisted we go all out

  • with our thoughts on the good, the bad,

  • the awesome, and the ugly,

  • and we'd have it no other way.

  • I will give you a full rundown on this system

  • and how it performs in another video,

  • which will be out really soon,

  • but now onto the good stuff.

  • When it comes to computers,

  • video editing is actually a fairly unique workflow.

  • Not only is editing incredibly intensive

  • on most aspects of a computer,

  • the software that you use

  • and the combination of parts that you choose

  • can make a big difference to your end performance

  • and the efficiency of your workflow.

  • So there's five key things to consider.

  • The first one is RAM.

  • Now RAM plays a huge role

  • in the overall power and the performance of your system.

  • It is definitely a case of the more the merrier

  • when it comes to RAM.

  • So having extra RAM in your system

  • won't just help with the render times and export times

  • of your video projects,

  • it will also help with how smooth

  • and how seamless everything plays back

  • while you're actually editing.

  • Having extra RAM in your system

  • will also help you keep that performance

  • if you've got multiple applications

  • running at the same time.

  • So an example would be you might be editing

  • in Adobe Premiere,

  • but you also might wanna open up Adobe After Effects

  • to fix up some animations or to edit titles,

  • effects, or motion graphics.

  • Or maybe you've got Adobe Photoshop open as well

  • so you can fix up some of your graphics.

  • Having these applications open at the same time

  • takes up a heap of system resources,

  • and chews through your RAMs.

  • So having additional RAM is gonna make that process

  • much more seamless,

  • and give you the power to be able to actually do it,

  • and do it well.

  • Now, it's important to note that is not just about

  • the amount of RAM that you've got.

  • RAM actually comes in different speeds.

  • It's also important to look at the

  • speed of the RAM that you're buying,

  • and to try and get the fastest RAM possible as well.

  • So my MacBook Pro is currently maxed out at 16 gig,

  • and this new system here currently has 32 gig

  • of DDR4 RAM in it.

  • Now I might even upgrade this to 64 gig some time soon

  • to get a bit more performance,

  • again, with multiple application running.

  • One cool thing about the RAM and the motherboard

  • that MSI sent us

  • is that this system supports DDR4 Boost Technology.

  • So what that does is it helps you get

  • the maximum performance out of your RAM

  • while it's talking to your CPU without any interference

  • from any of the other components on your motherboard,

  • but it also helps with the stability of the RAM

  • and the overall system as well.

  • So what I'd recommend when it comes to RAM

  • if you're on a budget

  • is to still try and get at least

  • 16 gig of RAM in your system,

  • and to try and get the fastest RAM

  • that you can on your budget.

  • If you've got a bigger budget,

  • then I'd definitely recommend to get at least

  • 32 gig of RAM in your system,

  • and again, the fastest RAM that you can afford as well.

  • Number two is storage.

  • Now when it comes to storage and setting everything up

  • for your video editing systems,

  • there's a heap of different options out there.

  • You've got things like SSDs, hard drives,

  • you've got RAID setups,

  • you've got external drives as well.

  • So there's a heap of different options,

  • but what I would recommend

  • is that you setup a multi drive system.

  • That way your computer is gonna have at least

  • two drives in it.

  • One of them will be a high-speed drive,

  • and the other one would be a much larger drive

  • to hold all of your video files.

  • And we recently did a video covering of

  • on all the different hard drive options for video editing

  • and what we recommend and what we use,

  • and I will link that up in the cards now.

  • But essentially, the high-speed drives, the SSDs,

  • will be a lot more expensive,

  • but they won't have the capacity, the storage capacity,

  • that the larger, cheaper hard drives have.

  • So what I would recommend is to get

  • at least one SSD drive in your system,

  • something that you're gonna install

  • your operating system on, your applications on,

  • so that all of that load fast

  • and that your system is gonna run fast.

  • And then you can get at least on regular hard drive

  • to save all of your video files on.

  • Now if you've got the budget,

  • you can also consider adding a second SSD drive

  • for added performance.

  • So you can use that second drive

  • as your working drive.

  • So all the files and everything that you're using

  • on your current project,

  • you could copy over to that drive and work from that,

  • and the speed and the performance you'll have

  • working from that drive will be much, much faster

  • than working off a spinning disk or a regular hard drive.

  • Number three is the CPU.

  • Now this is essentially the brain of your computer,

  • and it plays a huge role

  • in the performance on your video editing system.

  • But before you look at the CPUs,

  • you also should look at your video editing software

  • to see what the software will actually utilize

  • inside of the different CPUs.

  • Because when you're looking at the CPUs,

  • you've got things like cores.

  • There'll be different cores.

  • You can get a four-core, six-core,

  • eight-core, 12-core CPUs.

  • And you've also got a clock speed

  • or the actual speed that, that processor will run at.

  • And the impact of those two things on your video editing

  • will really be determined by

  • what video editing software you're using.

  • So whether the software that you're using

  • will support having multiple cores,

  • having eight core processor,

  • whether it's gonna use that,

  • or whether it's only gonna be based off

  • the clock speed of the processor itself.

  • Now there's two main manufacturers of CPUs.

  • You've got AMD and you've got Intel.

  • Now without jumping in to all the nitty-gritty there,

  • AMD has just released an new Ryzen CPU,

  • which offers incredible performance for gaming.

  • But when it comes to video editing,

  • there's really been mixed reviews out there.

  • As far as I'm concerned,

  • Intel has the edge for video editing, at least right now,

  • but I definitely wouldn't discount what AMD is up to.

  • So your CPU is definitely

  • a critical piece of the puzzle here.

  • And what I suggest is that you spend

  • a decent chunk of your budget in this area.

  • I'd also recommend targeting a higher clock speed,

  • so a faster processor over a processor with more cores.

  • And as you spend more money on your processor,

  • you'll actually increase both.

  • If you're on a low budget,

  • then something like the Intel Core i3 range of CPUs

  • or Core i5 range would be the place to start.

  • Or if you've got the budget,

  • then definitely check out the Intel Core i7 range.

  • We're currently using the Intel Core i7-8700k,

  • which is a six-core CPU clocked at 3.7 gigahertz.

  • Number four is your video card.

  • Now this plays a massive part in video editing.

  • But surprisingly, a lot of people disregard it,

  • and will focus more on CPU.

  • Now the CPU and your GPU or your video card

  • definitely go hand in hand,

  • but they actually do different things

  • and solve different problems when it comes to

  • high-end video editing.

  • So what you'll find in a lot of the video editing

  • application around these days

  • is that if you're using a compatible GPU

  • that a lot of the processor intensive tasks,

  • like rendering effects and color corrections and things

  • are all off loaded.

  • Instead of sending them to the CPE,

  • they're off loaded to your GPU.

  • So it's a much faster way of processing those effects

  • and rendering those out,

  • which in turn speeds up your whole editing process.

  • But it definitely comes down to

  • which video editing software you're using

  • as to how much is off loaded from your CPU to your GPU

  • to speed everything up.

  • In some cases, like Adobe Premiere,

  • everything is CPU until you use a GPU-enabled effect.

  • In other cases, almost everything

  • can be off loaded to your GPU,

  • speeding up