Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • First place I'd like to take you

    翻訳: Masahiro Kyushima 校正: Masaaki Ueno

  • is what many believe will be the world's deepest natural abyss.

    最初にまず皆さんを

  • And I say believe because this process is still ongoing.

    世界で最も深いと言われている地底にお連れします

  • Right now there are major expeditions being planned for next year

    まだ確認されているわけではありませんが

  • that I'll talk a little bit about.

    来年大規模な地底遠征が計画されています

  • One of the things that's changed here,

    それについて少しお話しします

  • in the last 150 years since Jules Verne

    ジュール・ベルヌが

  • had great science-fiction concepts of what the underworld was like,

    150年前にこのような地底についての

  • is that technology has enabled us to go to these places

    素晴らしい空想科学のアイデアを持って以来、変わったのは

  • that were previously completely unknown and speculated about.

    技術革新により実際にそこへいけるようになったことです

  • We can now descend thousands of meters into the Earth with relative impunity.

    以前は全く推測の域を出なかった場所へです

  • Along the way we've discovered fantastic abysses and chambers so large

    現在我々は、比較的楽に地底何千メートルまで降りることができます

  • that you can see for hundreds of meters

    途中には素晴らしい地割れや空洞があり、非常に大きくて

  • without a break in the line of sight.

    何百メートルも一直線に

  • When you go on a thing like this, we can usually be in the field

    見通すことができます

  • for anywhere from two to four months,

    これを続ける場合、大体は2~4ヶ月は

  • with a team as small as 20 or 30, to as big as 150.

    現場に居続けることになり

  • And a lot of people ask me, you know,

    最低20~30、最大150人くらいのチームになります

  • what kind of people do you get for a project like this?

    よく聞かれるのですが:「こういう

  • While our selection process

    計画にはどんな人を参加させるのか?」

  • is not as rigorous as NASA, it's nonetheless thorough.

    我々の人選過程はNASAほどは

  • We're looking for competence, discipline, endurance, and strength.

    厳格ではありませんが、それでも徹底しています

  • In case you're wondering, this is our strength test.

    有能で、自制心があり、持久力があり、体力のある人を求めています

  • (Laughter)

    興味があるなら、これが我々の体力テストです

  • But we also value esprit de corps

    (大岩を持ち上げているように見える写真:笑)

  • and the ability to diplomatically resolve inter-personal conflict

    しかし我々はまた

  • while under great stress in remote locations.

    地の果てのものすごいストレス下での団結心と、個人間の

  • We have already gone far beyond the limits of human endurance.

    対立を解消する対人スキルも重視します

  • From the entrance, this is nothing like a commercial cave.

    我々は既に人間の持久性の限界を超えています

  • You're looking at Camp Two in a place called J2, not K2, but J2.

    入口から見ています ここは観光用の洞窟とは全く違います

  • We're roughly two days from the entrance at that point.

    K2ならぬJ2という場所のキャンプを見ています

  • And it's kind of like a high altitude mountaineering trip in reverse,

    ここで入口から2日の距離です

  • except that you're now running a string of these things down.

    ちょうど高地登山を逆向きにやっているようなものです

  • The idea is to try to provide some measure of physical comfort

    こういうモノを下向きに下ろしている以外は

  • while you're down there, otherwise in damp, moist, cold conditions in utterly dark places.

    つまり、じめじめと湿気っていて、寒くて、漆黒の闇でも

  • I should mention that everything you're seeing here, by the way,

    なんとかいくらかでも快適にしようとしているのです

  • is artificially illuminated at great effort.

    付け加えておきますが、ここに見えるもの全ては

  • Otherwise it is completely dark in these places.

    ものすごく苦労して人工照明しているのです

  • The deeper you go, the more you run into a conflict with water.

    そうしなければここは、完全な闇です

  • It's basically like a tree collecting water coming down.

    深く進めば進むほど水にぶち当たることになります

  • And eventually you get to places where it is formidable and dangerous

    樹状構造になっていて、下に行くほど水が集まってくるのです

  • and unfortunately slides just don't do justice.

    そしてついには、こういう恐ろしく危険な場所に到達し

  • So I've got a very brief clip here that was taken in the late 1980s.

    スライドではよくわからないので

  • So descend into Huautla Plateau in Mexico.

    1980年代後半に撮ったビデオクリップをお見せします

  • (Video)

    メキシコのワウトラ高地の地底に潜ります

  • Now I have to tell you that the techniques being shown here

    (ビデオ)

  • are obsolete and dangerous.

    ここでお見せしているテクニックは、すでに

  • We would not do this today unless we were doing it for film.

    旧式で危険で

  • (Laughter)

    映画のためでもなければやりません

  • Along that same line, I have to tell you

    (笑)

  • that with the spate of Hollywood movies that came out last year,

    同じように、お話ししておきますが

  • we have never seen monsters underground --

    昨年ハリウッドから出たたくさんの映画のような

  • at least the kind that eat you.

    怪物は、地底にはいません

  • If there is a monster underground,

    少なくとも人を食うようなのは

  • it is the crushing psychological remoteness

    もしも地底に怪物がいるとしたら

  • that begins to hit every member of the team

    それは押しつぶされそうな心理的な孤立感で

  • once you cross about three days inbound from the nearest entrance.

    入口から3日以上進めば

  • Next year I'll be leading an international team to J2.

    チームメンバーのすべてに襲いかかります

  • We're going to be shooting from minus 2,600 meters --

    来年私はJ2への国際チームを率います

  • that's a little over 8,600 feet down --

    我々は地底2600メートルから始め

  • at 30 kilometers from the entrance.

    ―それは8600フィート強ですが―

  • The lead crews will be underground for pushing 30 days straight.

    入口から30キロメートル進みます

  • I don't think there's been a mission like that in a long time.

    先頭部隊は地底を連続30日以上突き進むことになり

  • Eventually, if you keep going down in these things,

    そんな長期ミッションはこれまではなかったはずです

  • probability says that you're going to run into a place like this.

    こういうところをずっと降り続けていけば

  • It's a place where there's a fold in the geologic stratum

    おそらくはこういう場所に行き着きます

  • that collects water and fills to the roof.

    地層断面に、天井まで

  • And when you used to find these things,

    水がたまっている場所です

  • they would put a label on a map that said terminal siphon.

    こういう場所を見つけると

  • Now I remember that term really well for two reasons.

    地図上に「ターミナルサイフォン」と印をつけます

  • Number one, it's the name of my rock band, and second,

    その用語は二つの理由でとても良く覚えています

  • is because the confrontation of these things

    まずそれは私のロックバンドの名前で、第二に

  • forced me to become an inventor.

    こういう場所と向き合うことによって

  • And we've since gone on to develop

    私は発明家になったからです

  • many generations of gadgets for exploring places like this.

    そしてこういう場所を探検するための

  • This is some life-support equipment closed-cycle.

    ガジェットを何世代分も開発したのです

  • And you can use that now to go for many kilometers horizontally

    これは閉鎖循環型の生命維持装置で

  • underwater and to depths of 200 meters straight down underwater.

    これを使って水平なら何キロも

  • When you do this kind of stuff it's like doing EVA.

    下へなら200メートルを一気に進むことができます

  • It's like doing extra-vehicular activity in space,

    これはEVA、つまり

  • but at much greater distances, and at much greater physical peril.

    宇宙での船外活動をするようなもので、

  • So it makes you think about how to design your equipment

    しかしはるかに長距離を、より大きな肉体的な危険を伴います

  • for long range, away from a safe haven.

    つまりここでは、安全な場所からはるかに離れた所で使う

  • Here's a clip from a National Geographic movie

    機具のデザインについて考えることになります

  • that came out in 1999.

    これはナショナルジオグラフィックの映画で

  • (Video) Narrator: Exploration is a physical process

    1999年に発表されました

  • of putting your foot in places where humans have never stepped before.

    (ビデオ)ナレーター:「探検とは、これまで誰も

  • This is where the last little nugget of totally unknown territory remains on this planet.

    足を踏み入れたことのない場所に行くことです

  • To experience it is a privilege.

    ここは地球上に残された全く未知の世界です

  • Bill Stone: That was taken in Wakulla Springs, Florida.

    これを体験できるのは特別なことです」

  • Couple of things to note about that movie. Every piece of equipment

    ビル・ストーン(BS):これはフロリダのワクラ湧水で撮影されました

  • that you saw in there did not exist before 1999.

    映画についていくつか:あそこでご覧になった道具は

  • It was developed within a two-year period and used on actual exploratory projects.

    1999年以前はどれも存在しませんでした

  • This gadget you see right here was called the digital wall mapper,

    あれはそれ以前の2年以内に開発され、探検計画に用いられたのです

  • and it produced the first three-dimensional map anybody has ever done

    ここに見えるのは「デジタル壁面地図作製器」と呼ばれ

  • of a cave, and it happened to be underwater in Wakulla Springs.

    洞窟の三次元マップを初めて作成し

  • It was that gadget that serendipitously opened a door

    それはたまたまワクラ湧水だったのです

  • to another unexplored world.

    このガジェットが、まるで魔法のように

  • This is Europa.

    未知の世界への扉を開いたのです

  • Carolyn Porco mentioned another one called Enceladus the other day.

    これはエウロパです

  • This is one of the places where planetary scientists

    先日カロリン・ポルコさんが別の惑星エンケラドスの話をしましたね

  • believe there is a highest probability of the detection

    ここは、惑星科学者が、惑星の表面下の大洋中で

  • of the first life off earth in the ocean that exists below there.

    地球以外での生物発見の確率が最も高いと

  • For those who have never seen this story,

    考えている場所の一つです

  • Jim Cameron produced a really wonderful IMAX movie

    この話を一度も見たことのない人のために

  • couple of years ago, called "Aliens of the Deep."

    ジム(ジェームズ)・キャメロンがIMAX映写システム用の、実に

  • There was a brief clip --

    素晴らしい映画「深海のエイリアン」を作りました

  • (Video) Narrator: A mission to explore under the ice of Europa

    これはその短いクリップです

  • would be the ultimate robotic challenge.

    (ビデオ)ナレーター:エウロパの氷の下を探索するミッションは

  • Europa is so far away that even at the speed of light,

    ロボット技術の究極の挑戦になるでしょう

  • it would take more than an hour for the command just to reach the vehicle.

    エウロパは非常に遠くにあるため、光の速さでも

  • It has to be smart enough to avoid terrain hazards

    命令が探査機に届くのに1時間以上かかります

  • and to find a good landing site on the ice.

    探査機は、地表の危険物を避け

  • Now we have to get through the ice.

    氷の上のちょうど良い着陸点を見つけなければなりません

  • You need a melt probe.

    さて、氷を通り抜けなくてはなりません

  • It's basically a nuclear-heated torpedo.

    融解探査機がいります

  • The ice could be anywhere from three to 16 miles deep.

    これは基本的には原子力推進の魚雷で

  • Week after week, the melt probe will sink of its own weight

    氷の厚さは5~25キロメートルあります

  • through the ancient ice, until finally --

    何週間も。融解探査機は

  • Now, what are you going to do when you reach the surface of that ocean?

    自重で太古の氷を通って沈んでいき、ついに

  • You need an AUV, an autonomous underwater vehicle.

    海水面に到達したら何をすれば良いか?

  • It needs to be one smart puppy, able to navigate

    自律型の水中探査機(AUV)が必要です

  • and make decisions on its own in an alien ocean.

    それは子犬のように賢く、異星の海の中で

  • BS: What Jim didn't know when he released that movie

    自分で判断し進んでいきます

  • was that six months earlier NASA had funded a team I assembled

    BS:この映画を作ったとき、ジムが知らなかったのは

  • to develop a prototype for the Europa AUV.

    この映画の6ヶ月前に、NASAが私の組織したチームに資金提供し

  • I mean, I cut through three years of engineering meetings, design

    エウロパ用のAUVの試作が始まったことです

  • and system integration, and introduced DEPTHX --

    つまり、3年にわたる技術ミーティング、設計、

  • Deep Phreatic Thermal Explorer.

    システム構築によりDEPTHXが完成したのです

  • And as the movie says, this is one smart puppy.

    「深部地下水熱探査機」です

  • It's got 96 sensors, 36 onboard computers,

    この映画が示すように、それは賢い子犬で

  • 100,000 lines of behavioral autonomy code,

    96のセンサーと36のコンピュータを搭載し

  • packs more than 10 kilos of TNT in electrical onboard equivalent.

    10万行の自律行動プログラムを持ち

  • This is the target site,

    搭載した電子機器に10キロのTNT火薬を積み込であります

  • the world's deepest hydrothermal spring at Cenote Zacaton in northern Mexico.

    これが目標地点で

  • It's been explored to a depth of 292 meters

    メキシコ北部のセノーテ・ザカトンの熱水泉です

  • and beyond that nobody knows anything.

    そこは水深292メートルまで探査されており

  • This is part of DEPTHX's mission.

    その下は誰も知りません

  • There are two primary targets we're doing here.

    それがDEPTHXのミッションの一部です

  • One is, how do you do science autonomy underground?

    ここでも主な目標は二つで

  • How do you take a robot and turn it into a field microbiologist?

    地下でどのように自律的な科学活動を行うか?

  • There are more stages involved here

    ロボットをどうやって現場の微生物学者にするか?

  • than I've got time to tell you about, but basically we drive

    ここでのステージの多くは

  • through the space, we populate it with environmental variables --

    お話しする時間がありませんが、基本的には

  • sulphide, halide, things like that.

    そこを動き回り、環境の変数つまり

  • We calculate gradient surfaces, and drive the bot over to a wall

    硫化物、ハロゲン化物などの比率を調べるのです

  • where there's a high probability of life.

    我々は表面の傾斜を計算し、壁の上を通って

  • We move along the wall, in what's called proximity operations,

    生命の存在確率の高い場所に行くのです

  • looking for changes in color.

    壁に沿って移動し、近接運用を行い

  • If we see something that looks interesting, we pull it into a microscope.

    色の変化を探します

  • If it passes the microscopic test, we go for a collection.

    何か興味深そうな場所を見つけると、それを顕微鏡に入れて観察します

  • We either draw in a liquid sample,

    顕微鏡でのテストを通過すると、採集にかかります

  • or we can actually take a solid core from the wall.

    単純に液体サンプルを採取するか

  • No hands at the wheel.

    壁から塊を取ることもできます

  • This is all behavioral autonomy here

    この操作に人は介入しません

  • that's being conducted by the robot on its own.

    ロボットによって

  • The real hat trick for this vehicle, though,

    全て自律的に行われます

  • is a disruptive new navigation system we've developed,

    この探査機の本当のハットトリックは

  • known as 3D SLAM, for simultaneous localization and mapping.

    我々が開発した革命的な制御システムで

  • DEPTHX is an all-seeing eyeball.

    3D SLAMといい、位置特定と地図作製を同時に行えます

  • Its sensor beams look both forward and backward at the same time,

    DEPTHXは全方位型の眼です

  • allowing it to do new exploration

    センサーが前も後ろも同時に見ていて

  • while it's still achieving geometric sensor-lock

    それまでに探索した場所を

  • on what it's gone through already.

    立体的にセンサーで位置固定している間に

  • What I'm going to show you next

    次の探索を始められるのです

  • is the first fully autonomous robotic exploration underground

    次にお見せするのは

  • that's ever been done.

    世界で初めての、完全自律型ロボットによる

  • This May, we're going to go from minus 1,000 meters in Zacaton,

    地下探索です

  • and if we're very lucky, DEPTHX will bring back the first

    今年の5月に、我々はザカトンの地下1000メートルから開始して

  • robotically-discovered division of bacteria.

    上手くいけばDEPTHXが、初めて、ロボットで発見された

  • The next step after that is to test it in Antartica and then,

    細菌の種類を持ち帰るでしょう

  • if the funding continues and NASA has the resolution to go,

    そのテストが済んだら次は南極で、そして次は

  • we could potentially launch by 2016, and by 2019

    資金が続いてNASAがOKを出せば

  • we may have the first evidence of life off this planet.

    2016年までに発射して2019年までに

  • What then of manned space exploration?

    地球外の生命の最初の証拠を得るかもしれません

  • The government recently announced plans to return to the moon by 2024.

    では有人宇宙探査はどうなのか?

  • The successful conclusion of that mission will result

    政府は2024年までに月へ再び行くとアナウンスしました

  • in infrequent visitation of the moon by a small number

    そのミッションが成功するとどうなるかというと

  • of government scientists and pilots.

    政府の科学者とパイロットが数人で

  • It will leave us no further along in the general expansion

    ごくたまに月に行く、ということになります

  • of humanity into space than we were 50 years ago.

    それでは、一般人が宇宙に広がる余地は

  • Something fundamental has to change

    50年前とさほど変わらず少ないのです

  • if we are to see common access to space in our lifetime.

    我々が生きている間に普通に宇宙に行くには

  • What I'm going to show you next are a couple of controversial ideas.

    何かが根本的に変わらなくてはなりません

  • And I hope you'll bear with me and have some faith

    次にお示しするのは、いくつかの議論の余地のあるアイデアです

  • that there's credibility behind what we're going to say here.

    これからお話しすることを辛抱して聞いていただき

  • There are three underpinnings of working in space privately.

    その話の背景を信用してもらえると良いのですが

  • One of them is the requirement

    プライベートに宇宙に行くには3つのサポートがいります

  • for economical earth-to-space transport.

    そのうちの一つは、経済的な

  • The Bert Rutans and Richard Bransons of this world

    地球―宇宙間の交通手段です

  • have got this in their sights and I salute them.

    バート・ルータンとリチャード・ブランソンがこれを

  • Go, go, go.

    視野に入れていて、私は彼らを尊敬します

  • The next thing we need are places to stay on orbit.

    いけ、いけ、やってくれ!

  • Orbital hotels to start with, but workshops for the rest of us later on.

    二つ目は、軌道上で滞在できるスペースです

  • The final missing piece, the real paradigm-buster, is this:

    初めは軌道上のホテルですが、しかし後には我々の作業場になります

  • a gas station on orbit.

    最後に欠けているものは、本物のパラダイム破壊者ですが、これです

  • It's not going to look like that.

    軌道上のガソリンスタンドです

  • If it existed, it would change all future spacecraft design and space mission planning.

    こんな形はしてないでしょうが (笑)

  • Now, to give you a chance to understand

    もしそれがあれば、今後の宇宙船のデザインとミッションの立て方を変えてしまうでしょう

  • why there is power in that statement,

    さて、この言葉になぜ力があるかを

  • I've got to give you the basics of Space 101.

    皆さんに理解していただくために

  • And the first thing is everything you do in space you pay by the kilogram.

    宇宙に関する入門講座を行いましょう

  • Anybody drink one of these here this week?

    まず、あなたが宇宙でやることは全て、キログラム単位で支払いします

  • You'd pay 10,000 dollars for that in orbit.

    この会場に来てペットボトルの水を飲まれましたか?

  • That's more than you pay for TED,

    軌道では、これには100万円の値段がつきます

  • if Google dropped their sponsorship.

    TEDに払うよりも高いですよね

  • (Laughter)

    もしグーグルがスポンサーから降りたらわかりませんが

  • The second is more than 90 percent of the weight of a vehicle is in propellant.

    (笑)

  • Thus, every time you'd want to do anything in space,

    次に、乗り物の重量の90%以上は、燃料なのです

  • you are literally blowing away enormous sums of money

    なので、あなたが何か宇宙でやりたいと思うと

  • every time you hit the accelerator.

    あなたがアクセルを踏むたびに、莫大なお金を

  • Not even the guys at Tesla can fight that physics.

    燃やしているようなものです

  • So, what if you could get your gas at a 10th the price?

    テスラ自動車の人でもこの物理法則ににはかないません

  • There is a place where you can.

    もし燃料を10分の1の値段で買えたらどうでしょう

  • In fact, you can get it better -- you can get it at 14 times lower

    それができる場所があります

  • if you can find propellant on the moon.

    実際、それを14倍まで安くすることができます

  • There is a little-known mission that was launched

    もしも燃料が月にあるのなら、です

  • by the Pentagon, 13 years ago now, called Clementine.

    今から13年前、米国防総省がほとんど知られていない

  • And the most amazing thing that came out of that mission

    ミッションを開始しました 「クレメンタイン」です

  • was a strong hydrogen signature at Shackleton crater

    そのミッションから得られた最も面白い発見は

  • on the south pole of the moon.

    月の南極のシャクルトンクレーターに非常に強い

  • That signal was so strong,

    水素の形跡があるということでした

  • it could only have been produced by 10 trillion tons of water

    その信号は非常に強く

  • buried in the sediment, collected over millions and billions of years

    何百万、何十億年の間に、10兆トンの水が

  • by the impact of asteroids and comet material.

    小惑星や彗星が衝突で堆積した物質に埋もれていなければ

  • If we're going to get that, and make that gas station possible,

    あり得ないほどのものです

  • we have to figure out ways to move large volumes of payload through space.

    もしそこにあるものを利用し、ガソリンスタンドを作るには

  • We can't do that right now.

    宇宙空間越しに大量の貨物を運ぶ方法を考案する必要があります

  • The way you normally build a system right now is you have a tube stack

    今はまだそれができない

  • that has to be launched from the ground,

    今そのために作れるシステムは、多段筒型のロケットを

  • and resist all kinds of aerodynamic forces.

    地面から打ち上げ